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  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Britain, Conservatives Face Defeat in ‘Crisis’ By-Election

    On Thursday, English voters in the constituency of Rochester and Strood, in the country of Kent south-east of London, are likely to return Mark Reckless to Parliament as the UK Independence Party’s (UKIP) second MP. When Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron promised a month ago to throw “everything we can” at the campaign, this wasn’t the result he anticipated. Like…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Russia's Aggression Isn't Stopping in Ukraine

    NATO confirmed on Wednesday that Russian tanks were moving into rebel-controlled eastern Ukraine. But Russia's aggression under Vladimir Putin didn't begin in Ukraine and, unless the West stops vacillating, it won't end there, either. After the 2003 Rose Revolution, the nation of Georgia, in the Caucasus, became a staunch American ally. But in 2008, it was invaded and…

  • Commentary posted November 4, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Foreign Crises Weaken Obama at Home

    The conventional wisdom is that US voters don’t care about foreign policy. Even on its face, this is silly: Korea, Vietnam, 9/11, and Iraq mattered in the ensuing elections. But voters don’t just care about wars. They care about perceptions of strength. And since 2013, President Barack Obama has looked weak. The most compelling part of tomorrow’s mid-term elections is…

  • Commentary posted November 4, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Haunting Liberal Superstitions

    On Halloween weekend, everyone pretends to believe in ghosts. But a recent Chapman University study found that liberals are more likely to really be quaking in their boots. The supernatural doesn't scare me. But I am afraid of liberal faith in policies that make as much sense as astrology. Conventional wisdom holds that it's conservatives who are anti-scientific…

  • Commentary posted October 21, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. From Libya to Ebola, Obama Administration Talks Big but Acts Small

    The Obama administration has responded to the Ebola epidemic by talking big. It does that well. From the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti to Syria's use of chemical weapons in 2013, the administration has made a lot of splashy responses. But making a splash isn't the same as being serious. Take the Haitian earthquake, which killed more than 300,000 people. The initial…

  • Commentary posted October 6, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Politics of Floating Voters Dominate the Conferences

    This year, I attended the Conservative Party Conference, which has just concluded in Birmingham. As a historian of British politics, and as an American conservative who believes that the American and British systems are each excellent in their own way, it was not what I expected. One point of comparison is obvious: both the US and Britain have party conventions. In…

  • Commentary posted October 6, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. What's at Stake in U.S. Strategy in Syria

    The Obama administration's strategy for Syria relies on using U.S. air power to support local forces. If this approach fails, as it has failed in the past, the United States will find itself still lacking an effective, politically viable strategy for fighting Islamist terror more than a decade after 9/11 attacks. Since World War II, U.S. administrations have sought ways…

  • Commentary posted October 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Birmingham, Shut Up and Cheer

    The first thing that strikes an American about the Conservative party’s annual conference — which opened on Sunday in Birmingham, in Britain’s Midlands — is how small it feels. The convention center will supposedly welcome almost 14,000 attendees, but it looked less crowded — and less engaged — than the meeting in the United States of the Conservative Political Action…

  • Commentary posted September 30, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Obama's UN Speech Reveals Why Arms Trade Treaty is so Dangerous

    Addressing the U.N. General Assembly on Wednesday, President Obama said that all nations “must meet our responsibility to observe and enforce international norms.” What he meant by that wasn’t exactly clear, starting with what those norms are, and who gets to define them. But that kind of thinking on the president’s part is precisely why the United Nations Arms Trade…

  • Commentary posted September 29, 2014 by Steven Groves, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Obama Says No to Landmines

    On March 6, 2014, America’s highest-ranking military officer, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey, called anti-personnel landmines (APLs) “an important tool in the arsenal of the armed forces of the United States.” Yesterday, President Obama banned the armed forces from using them. Why? To comply with a treaty — the Ottawa Convention — that the…

  • Report posted September 26, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Freedom from the EU: Why Britain and the U.S. Should Pursue a U.S.–U.K. Free Trade Area

    The United Kingdom is considering leaving the European Union, and a referendum on British membership is currently scheduled for 2017. The most common argument against a British exit from the EU is that it would be bad for Britain’s economy and, in particular, would damage its ability to negotiate trading arrangements with the rest of the world—a responsibility currently…

  • Commentary posted September 25, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Scottish Referendum: Who Won, Who Lost

    In the end, the vote in Scotland wasn’t particularly close. With 97 percent of the eligible population registered to vote, and an 85 percent turnout, Scotland rejected independence by a decisive margin of just over 2 million votes against (and 1.6 million for). The independence campaign put a serious scare into the supporters of the Union, but they started behind. As…

  • Issue Brief posted September 25, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Congress Should Stop Implementation of the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty

    On September 25, 2013, Secretary of State John Kerry signed the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). In the past year, the ATT has gone from bad to worse as the aims of its supporters and its failure in practice have become obvious. Yet the Obama Administration, without even transmitting the treaty to the Senate, has sought to implement it. Congress should hold hearings to…

  • Backgrounder posted September 17, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): The Geopolitical Reality

    In his February 2013 State of the Union Address, President Barack Obama called for a free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union. This proposed agreement is now known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The President’s announcement has been taken by politicians and commentators on both sides of the Atlantic as an effort…

  • Backgrounder posted September 17, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Bryan Riley The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Economic Benefits and Potential Risks

    In February 2013, President Barack Obama called for a free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union during his State of the Union address. This proposed agreement is now known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The President’s announcement has been taken by politicians and commentators on both sides of the Atlantic as an…