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  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanisms: An Important Feature of High-Quality Trade Agreements

    One of the most important—albeit controversial—components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) trade agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) is the provision creating an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism. The French Senate has unanimously called for the removal of this provision both from the TTIP…

  • Commentary posted February 10, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In the Middle East, let's support our friends

    King Abdullah II of Jordan is angry. In a meeting with members of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, he quoted Clint Eastwood in promising retribution against the Islamist radicals who burned a Jordanian pilot to death. He wants our support. He should get it. Here's my cardinal rule of foreign policy: Back your friends. Right now, the United States…

  • Commentary posted January 29, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Firearms Makers Are So Worried Even as The Second Amendment Is Stronger than Ever

    The Shot Show — Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoor Trade Show — is the world’s largest gun show. Held annually in Las Vegas, it’s intended for those in the trade, not the general public. Walking its almost 16 miles of booths is a near-marathon feat of endurance, and every mile exhibits more firepower than all the armies of the ancient world combined. But despite their…

  • Commentary posted January 26, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama finally offers a clear choice

    Let's be grateful to President Barack Obama. In his State of the Union address, he dropped the pretense of bipartisanship and, by siding with the progressives, gave the nation what it needs: a clear choice. That's the true American way. One of the most tiresome things about the first six years of President Obama's tenure was his fake bipartisanship. He often offered to…

  • Commentary posted January 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The closing chapter of a not so special relationship?

    The White House announced Prime Minister David Cameron’s two-day visit to Washington in a statement issued last Saturday. It was a tellingly low-key announcement for an Anglo-American relationship that has mostly drifted in the past five years. The alliance, though, does have one big idea up its sleeve. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one. It’s entirely possible that this will…

  • Commentary posted January 15, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. No, Senate Republicans Aren’t Blocking Reasonable Treaties

    Those nasty Republicans are at it again. Dennis Jett, former U.S. ambassador to Mozambique and Peru, writes in The New Republic that GOP senators are blocking “even the most reasonable international treaties.” As opposed, apparently, to that mythical entity, the domestic treaty. The ambassador proclaims the virtues of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which will somehow…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Top Five Policy Priorities for Europe in 2015

    The United States faces mounting challenges in Europe in 2015. Russia is on the march in Ukraine, many of America’s oldest allies question its commitment to transatlantic security, and the economies of Europe have still not fully recovered from the Euro crisis. In addition, the specter of Islamist terrorism has raised its ugly head again in Europe, with the brutal slaying…

  • Issue Brief posted January 13, 2015 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. David Cameron’s Visit to Washington: An Important Opportunity to Renew Anglo–American Leadership

    President Barack Obama will host British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on January 15–16. This will be Cameron’s last visit to the United States before the U.K.’s general election on May 7, 2015. Five issues should dominate the visit: (1) Russia’s aggression in Eastern Europe; (2) the crisis in Iran and the Levant; (3) the future of the U.K. inside the…

  • Commentary posted January 12, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. On North Korea, a one-shot's not enough

    The media is under assault in the United States and abroad. The terrorist attacks in France are more shocking, but the cyberwar on Sony is more dangerous: none of us are isolated from the Internet. The Obama administration's response to the Sony hack pointed in the right direction, but it wasn't enough. One of the problems with cyber-attacks is that it's hard to know…

  • Commentary posted January 8, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Quest for legacy leads Obama to Castro’s door

    The second term of a US presidency usually goes worse than the first. Lyndon Johnson had Vietnam, George W Bush had Iraq, and – because the 1990s was a clownish decade – Bill Clinton had Monica Lewinski. The first two years of President Obama’s final term have been a failure. With the mid-term elections now over, his hunt for a legacy has begun. After the mid-terms, my…

  • Commentary posted January 2, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Three questions worth asking for 2015

    The best way to get ahead in the world is to predict the future. Unfortunately, to paraphrase author and humorist Douglas Adams, people who make predictions usually end up looking very dead, very silly or both. So instead of predicting, ask questions. You won't get answers, but you'll be better prepared when the unexpected happens. Here's what I'm asking questions about…

  • Commentary posted January 2, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Israel Signs the Arms Trade Treaty: Unhelpful Appeasement for Implacable Enemies

    Last Thursday, Israel signed the U.N.’s Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), a treaty that supposedly prevents nations from arming terrorists and mass murderers. But in reality, the treaty’s advocates spend most of their time vehemently criticizing Israel, and, of course, the United States. Israel is understandably tired of the relentless criticism of the way it defends itself from…

  • Issue Brief posted December 19, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Top 11 Areas for Congressional Action on the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty in 2015

    The coming year will be a crucial one for the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and for the defense of U.S. sovereignty against those who seek to use the ATT to constrain it. The ATT will enter into force on December 24, 2014. In late August, the first Conference of States Party (CSP) to the treaty will be held in Mexico City to establish the rules of procedure for future…

  • Issue Brief posted December 18, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Congress Should Continue to Oppose Arms Trade Treaty As It Enters Into Force

    On December 24, 2014, the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) will enter into force. Treaty supporters claim that the ATT, which the U.S. has signed but not ratified, will then become international law, implying that it will apply to the U.S. In fact, the treaty will be binding only on those nations that have ratified it. Congress should therefore continue to oppose ratification…

  • Commentary posted December 16, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. From Academia to a Think Tank: Reflections on How to Be Lucky

    I wanted to be a professor. It wasn’t so much a goal as an assumption. My father was a professor, so for me, going to graduate school in history was less a conscious choice than it was a simple staying of the course. But I never got to be a tenure-track professor. Instead, I now work at The Heritage Foundation, a center for the study of public policy options. Or, as…