• Heritage Action
  • More
  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. All the way with LBJ and Obama

    Count on it: When it comes to foreign policy, two-term presidents -- and even most one-term presidents -- will change course along the way. Since 1933, only two have not: Lyndon Johnson, who rode the Vietnam War all the way down, and Barack Obama. That's not a good sign. Consider the record. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in 1933, he began by torpedoing…

  • Commentary posted July 21, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. How to become a U.S. ambassador

    Last week, President Barack Obama appointed a new ambassador to the Court of St. James's (most of us call it Britain). It's our most prestigious diplomatic post. It also had a "for rent" sign on it: the new ambassador, Matthew Barzun, was the chief fundraiser for Obama's re-election campaign. Barzun was formerly our ambassador to Sweden, a job he got because of his…

  • Issue Brief posted July 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Failings and Structural Irrelevance of the U.N.’s Small-Arms Process

    In 2001, the United Nations created the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA). The PoA is not a treaty. Rather, it is a political mechanism for encouraging voluntary cooperation. On June 1–5, 2015, the Second Meeting of Governmental Experts (MGE2) under the PoA was held in New York…

  • Issue Brief posted July 15, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD The Proposed Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanism: U.S. Should Oppose EU Demand to Abandon It

    Revised One of the most important components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the United States and the European Union is the establishment of a mechanism for investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). An appropriately structured ISDS is an essential part of trade agreement enforcement and should be included in any comprehensive…

  • Commentary posted July 13, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. European Union not the answer to Greek extremism

    After 1945, the U.S. promoted economic freedom and growth in Europe to keep Communism at bay. Today, by backing the European Union in Greece, the Obama administration is driving Greece deeper into a depression that already has brought the far left to power. Greece desperately needs pro-market reforms. It spends too much on welfare; its tax system is a disaster, and its…

  • Commentary posted July 7, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Where are the new leaders for unpopular left?

    Across the English-speaking world, the left has a leadership problem. In Australia, Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s unpopularity is exceeded only by that of Labour opposition leader Bill Shorten. New Zealand’s conservative Prime Minister John Key is at a low ebb, yet he is still three times as popular as Labour’s Andrew Little. And in Canada, Liberal leader Justin Trudeau…

  • Commentary posted June 29, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama is right to want free trade, but he has the wrong reasons

    No thanks to his fellow Democrats, President Barack Obama won a victory in Congress last week when Republicans voted to give him the authority to negotiate trade agreements in Asia and Europe. Too bad so much of the president's case for the agreements is based on his belief that the United States is in decline. Let's take a step back. Since 1945, the United States has…

  • Commentary posted June 16, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Should Obama pester, nag, and bite? Yes.

    During a news conference Monday at the G-7 meeting in Germany, President Barack Obama acknowledged that his administration does not have a "complete strategy" to defeat the Islamic State group. That much is obvious. What's as troubling as his strategic failure is the president's explanation of why he has failed. Obama defended himself with the promise that "When a…

  • Commentary posted June 8, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. At a U.N. Meeting on Guns, the U.S. Stands Up under Fire

    This week, Turtle Bay is hosting the second Meeting of Governmental Experts for the U.N.’s Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects – mercifully abbreviated to MGE2 and PoA, respectively. The PoA is a strange entity. It’s a political agreement, not a treaty, so it’s never come before the…

  • Commentary posted June 4, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Climate change is not a national security threat

    Earlier this month, the Obama administration released its latest blast on climate change: a cut-and-paste job from its own reports proclaiming that climate change has serious national security implications. This is embarrassingly shoddy stuff. But it's shoddy for a reason. Now, nothing says credibility like a pile of old federal reports. But these reports do seem like…

  • Commentary posted June 4, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The US-UK-EU Triangle

    How will the EU affect the future of the Anglo-American special relationship? This article was adapted from a presentation given at a conference called “Grand Strategy and the Anglo-American World View: A Century of the Special Relationship.” The conference was jointly sponsored by King’s College London and the University of Texas at Austin and held at King’s College…

  • Issue Brief posted May 28, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Declines in National Reporting Reveal Failure of U.N.’s Programme of Action on Small Arms

    In 2001, the United Nations created the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA). The PoA is not a treaty. Rather, it is a political mechanism for encouraging voluntary cooperation. On June 1–5, 2015, the Second Meeting of Governmental Experts (MGE2) under the PoA will be held in New…

  • Commentary posted May 27, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Obama Doctrine and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

    On Tuesday, President Barack Obama lost a vote on trade policy in the Senate. The strange thing is why he lost. For years, conservatives have voiced impatience with Obama's foreign policy. But this time, all but one Republican voted for him, and all but one Democrat voted against him. Foreign policy used to be one of Obama's political strengths. But since June, his…

  • Commentary posted May 19, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. TTIP: small upside, big downside

    One of the best things about the debate between believers in the free market over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), the so-called US-EU free trade area, is that it cuts to the heart of a larger question: how do we advance freedom in practice? A lot of opponents of TTIP on the left (and some on the right) reject it either because they hate free…

  • Commentary posted May 18, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. They Said It Couldn’t Be Done

    London The smart money said there was no way the Conservatives could win a majority in last Thursday’s general election in Britain. On the left, the New Statesman’s widely followed May2015 blog offered a cogent argument that there would be a blocking majority even against any repeat of the Conservative-led coalition government. On the right, columnist Matthew Parris…