• Heritage Action
  • Heritage Libertad
  • More
  • Issue Brief posted April 2, 2014 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Tomahawk Cancellation an Error of Defense Strategy and Alliance Policy

    Earlier this month, the U.S. Navy announced that it will stop buying Tomahawk cruise missiles in fiscal year (FY) 2016 and will seek to field a replacement within a decade. This decision is an error of both defense strategy and alliance policy. Congress should reject the Navy’s plans and require that it continue to buy a sufficient number of Tomahawks annually to keep…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

  • Commentary posted February 19, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Hypocritical NGOs like to blame US while turning blind eye to terror

    The U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) is an ambiguous, inherently flawed treaty. It’s also the creation of liberal non-governmental organizations (NGOs) whose attitude is simple: blame America first. When Secretary of State John Kerry signed the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) on September 25, he paid tribute to these NGOs, groups like Amnesty International and Oxfam. They were,…

  • Commentary posted February 3, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Olympics’ edifice complex is ultimately a loser

    The Olympic Winter Games start Friday in Sochi, Russia. They were supposed to cost $12 billion, but the latest estimate is higher: more than $50 billion. Small wonder that, increasingly, the nations that want to host international sporting events are corrupt, publicity-seeking dictatorships or deluded Keynesians. We’ve been here before. The 1976 Summer Games in Montreal…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James Phillips Top Five Foreign Policy Priorities for 2014

    The United States faces mounting challenges abroad in 2014. With weak leadership from the White House over the past five years, the U.S. has been confronted and all too often sidelined by America’s adversaries and strategic competitors. The Obama Administration’s “leading from behind” strategy has been a spectacular failure that has led to confusion among traditional U.S.…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. After U.S. Signature, Dangers of U.N. Arms Trade Treaty Begin to Surface

    After U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry signed the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in September, a bipartisan majority of the Senate stated its opposition to ratifying the treaty. Over the past months, the dangers of the ATT have become increasingly obvious, and supporters of the treaty have been increasingly assertive in their claims and their criticism of the United…

  • Commentary posted January 3, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A ground game that could favor the U.S.

    As in the previous decade, freedom made little headway in 2013. Throughout that period, the United States has labored unsuccessfully to build free governments in the Middle East and Africa. In 2014, we should seek to promote freedom where the going may be easier. Freedom isn't retreating. But it isn't advancing either. Freedom House, a Washington-based advocacy group,…

  • Commentary posted December 13, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Lesson of Saddam's fall is that war can be best way to justice

    It was only a decade ago that US forces pulled Saddam Hussein out of his spiderhole at a farmhouse in ad-Dawr, near his home town of Tikrit. That success – indeed, that war – seems now to belong to another century. But it’s not so far removed from today’s travails. The aftermath of the Iraq War convinced many that the price of justice for Saddam was too high. But the…

  • Backgrounder posted December 11, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., David B. Kopel Necessary Reforms Can Keep Interpol Working in the U.S. Interest

    On April 23, 2012, the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) denied an Egyptian request to issue a Red Notice—often incorrectly described as an international arrest warrant—for 15 personnel from nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that receive U.S. funding, whom the Egyptian government accused of illegally operating pro-democracy programs.[1] Several…

  • Commentary posted December 6, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. President Obama flunks 'Make a Deal 101'

    In "Let's Make a Deal", audience members trade one prize for a chance at winning a better one, but take the risk of getting only a worthless Zonk. The pressure is on to take the gamble. This makes a great game show, but in reality it's a terrible way to negotiate. Good agreements aren't driven by a desperate need to deal. As the Obama administration has illustrated…

  • Issue Brief posted December 5, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Rea S. Hederman, Jr., Bryan Riley, Luke Coffey Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): Pitfalls and Promises

    The United States and the European Union (EU) have begun the negotiation of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which could greatly reduce or eliminate both tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade between the U.S. and the EU, a trade relationship that accounts for about 30 percent of world trade. The promotion of economic freedom is a vital part of…

  • Commentary posted November 23, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. UK needs freedom to pick talent from whole world

    Make no mistake, New York is a great city. I can’t visit it without a sense of ant-like awe. Yet while I respect New York, I love London. It’s gigantic, but it still feels like civilization on a human scale. I’ve been coming to Britain – not just London – regularly since 1989. But when I visited London again last month, I felt something different. New York is…

  • Commentary posted October 18, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Good news from Washington -- UN Arms Trade Treaty DOA in US Senate

    Sens. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) released a bipartisan letter this week signed by 48 of their colleagues pledging to oppose the U.N. Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which Secretary of State John Kerry signed on behalf of the United States in September. This letter makes it clear that the Senate will not ratify the treaty in the foreseeable future.…

  • Commentary posted October 7, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Flexible relations will help Britain achieve a more prosperous future

    In public policy, what starts as the unthinkable can first become simply the impossible, then the undesirable, then the possible, then the inevitable – and, finally, the right choice all along. Forty years ago, permanent British membership of the EEC – as it then was – appeared all but inevitable. Now it’s Britain’s exit that is well into the ‘possible’ stage, with…

  • Commentary posted September 27, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Jihad is the war that won't end

    All wars end eventually. But some don't end when and where you think they will. Take the civil war in Syria. When that conflict ends, the forces opposing Assad will move elsewhere, including to Europe. We may not want to intervene in Syria, but Syria is likely to intervene in us. In the Middle East, strong governments, like Iran's, are often bad. But an absence of…