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  • Commentary posted January 25, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Top Ten US Myths About the European Union

    If the US is to be an effective ally of the democratic nations of Europe, it must see the European Union (EU) as it really is. In the years after the Second World War, the US was right to encourage Western Europe to trade more freely and to cooperate for their own security, both to defend against the Soviet threat and to stabilize the region’s fragile post-war…

  • Commentary posted January 21, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Blame Washington for Skyrocketed College Costs

    In a matter of days, college applications will be due. No family can look at those applications without thinking of the opportunity college represents. But they also can’t look without thinking of the bills. A new research paper helps explain why those costs are so high. We accept inflation as a fact of life. But as my Heritage colleague Lindsey Burke points out, there’s…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Top 10 Areas for Congressional Action on the Arms Trade Treaty in 2016

    The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which Congress has rightly opposed, entered into force on December 24, 2014. The U.S. signed the ATT on September 25, 2013, but the Administration has yet to transmit the treaty to the Senate. The first Conference of States Parties (CSP) to the ATT was held in Cancun, Mexico, on August 24–27, 2015. The CSP set out the rules of procedure for…

  • Commentary posted January 13, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Russia’s Insecurity Strategy

    Russia’s new National Security Strategy, signed by Vladimir Putin as last year came to a close, isn’t shy about naming its enemies. From the U.S. to the European Union, from NATO to the varying-colored revolutions, Russia sees foes everywhere.   That’s understandable: the treacherous are always distrustful. But the strategy’s biggest surprise is that it shows Russia has…

  • Commentary posted January 11, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Project Fear Is David Cameron's Ultimate Weapon in EU Struggle

    David Cameron launched his renegotiation of Britain’s EU membership with the hope that “we can deliver a more flexible, adaptable and open European Union”. As that optimism has faded, the resort to fear has grown. And so far, the US has lent a willing hand. It’s startling to go back now to Cameron’s Bloomberg speech. It appeared to make the case for fundamental reform…

  • Issue Brief posted January 8, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Daniel Kochis Top Five Priorities for U.S. Policy Toward Europe in 2016

    U.S. policy toward Europe in 2015 failed to rise to the significant challenges that confront it. The U.S. is no closer to having a clear and comprehensive strategy to deal with Russia than it was a year ago; it continues to devalue key bilateral and multilateral relationships in Europe for the sake of supporting the European Union (EU); and it took no effective steps to…

  • Commentary posted January 6, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Three Things to Watch for in 2016

    The trick in life isn’t to know the answers: it’s to ask the right questions. At the end of 2014, I asked three questions about 2015 that I believed would shape the year. Columnists are too rarely held responsible for their work, so, in the name of accountability, here were my questions for 2015, with new ones for 2016. My first question last year was whether low-cost…

  • Commentary posted December 21, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Lessons in Charity for Mark Zuckerberg

    Charity is a blessing. But we are not commanded to be charitable merely to help others. Gifts are supposed to humble the giver. But lately, humility has been in short supply. So colossal is Mark Zuckerberg’s current wealth that his pledge to give away 99 percent of it will leave his new daughter a mere $450 million on which to live. If anyone can afford to be charitable,…

  • Special Report posted December 9, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Dean Cheng, Luke Coffey, Lisa Curtis, Helle C. Dale, Michaela Dodge, David Inserra, Bruce Klingner, Daniel Kochis, Ryan Olson, James Phillips, Ana Quintana, Bryan Riley, Brian Slattery, William T. Wilson, Ph.D. U.S. Comprehensive Strategy Toward Russia

    Introduction Since the end of the Cold War, the U.S. has not had a coherent, comprehensive strategy toward Russia. As the Russian invasion of Ukraine demonstrates, the U.S. has paid a price for this failure and, of course, many of Russia’s neighbors have paid far higher prices. At the core of the U.S. failure has been an unwillingness to assess the nature of the Russian…

  • Commentary posted November 30, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Whose values is Barack Obama promoting in Syria?

    The most serious problem with the Syrian refugees isn't that they'll bring terrorists with them. It's the war in Syria that made them refugees in the first place. President Barack Obama claims we have to admit refugees if we are to live up to our values. But he's the one who's sat on his hands as Syria burned. It's banal to say that concerns about terrorism are…

  • Issue Brief posted November 13, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD The U.S. Should Reject the European Commission’s Proposed Investment Court

    The proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the United States and the European Union, if negotiated successfully, will certainly contain a mechanism for resolving disputes related to the treaty. The current model for Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) panels is widely used, but also wrongly controversial, particularly in Europe. The…

  • Commentary posted November 2, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Problems Brewing for the BRICs

    For the past 15 years, if you wanted to sound smart about the world, you talked about the rising power of the BRICs. Today, it's the struggles of the BRICs that are making news. But those weaknesses were there all along. The rise of the BRICs, as a term, was a triumph of slick marketing. The BRICs are the nations of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and, since 2010,…

  • Commentary posted November 2, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Lady Wants to Fly

    In the Second World War, flying in a Boeing B-17—the iconic Flying Fortress—was dangerous beyond belief. Of the 12,731 bombers produced between 1937 and 1945, 4,754 were lost or written off in the course of operations, a loss rate of 37 percent. Ten Americans, the B-17’s standard crew, risked death on every mission. To fly in the plane is to remember that, and them.…

  • Commentary posted October 19, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The UN has yet to learn its lesson

    The announcement last week that Angus Deaton of Princeton University won the 2015 Nobel Prize in economics offers an opportunity to celebrate the gains the world has made, and to reflect on how we can do better. Unfortunately, the United Nations has not taken that opportunity. Deaton's research focuses on the use of data from families -- not from surveys of the public…

  • Commentary posted October 9, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Ted Bromund: Tory safety first strategy is not without its risks

    At last year’s Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham, the questions were about what was going to happen in Britain’s election. In May, those questions were answered. So at this year’s Conference in Manchester, which I attended for two days, the questions had shifted to less pressing but no less vital concerns. Conservatives naturally wanted to know what the…