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  • Commentary posted June 29, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama is right to want free trade, but he has the wrong reasons

    No thanks to his fellow Democrats, President Barack Obama won a victory in Congress last week when Republicans voted to give him the authority to negotiate trade agreements in Asia and Europe. Too bad so much of the president's case for the agreements is based on his belief that the United States is in decline. Let's take a step back. Since 1945, the United States has…

  • Commentary posted June 16, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Should Obama pester, nag, and bite? Yes.

    During a news conference Monday at the G-7 meeting in Germany, President Barack Obama acknowledged that his administration does not have a "complete strategy" to defeat the Islamic State group. That much is obvious. What's as troubling as his strategic failure is the president's explanation of why he has failed. Obama defended himself with the promise that "When a…

  • Commentary posted June 8, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. At a U.N. Meeting on Guns, the U.S. Stands Up under Fire

    This week, Turtle Bay is hosting the second Meeting of Governmental Experts for the U.N.’s Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects – mercifully abbreviated to MGE2 and PoA, respectively. The PoA is a strange entity. It’s a political agreement, not a treaty, so it’s never come before the…

  • Commentary posted June 4, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Climate change is not a national security threat

    Earlier this month, the Obama administration released its latest blast on climate change: a cut-and-paste job from its own reports proclaiming that climate change has serious national security implications. This is embarrassingly shoddy stuff. But it's shoddy for a reason. Now, nothing says credibility like a pile of old federal reports. But these reports do seem like…

  • Commentary posted June 4, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The US-UK-EU Triangle

    How will the EU affect the future of the Anglo-American special relationship? This article was adapted from a presentation given at a conference called “Grand Strategy and the Anglo-American World View: A Century of the Special Relationship.” The conference was jointly sponsored by King’s College London and the University of Texas at Austin and held at King’s College…

  • Issue Brief posted May 28, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Declines in National Reporting Reveal Failure of U.N.’s Programme of Action on Small Arms

    In 2001, the United Nations created the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat, and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA). The PoA is not a treaty. Rather, it is a political mechanism for encouraging voluntary cooperation. On June 1–5, 2015, the Second Meeting of Governmental Experts (MGE2) under the PoA will be held in New…

  • Commentary posted May 27, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The Obama Doctrine and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

    On Tuesday, President Barack Obama lost a vote on trade policy in the Senate. The strange thing is why he lost. For years, conservatives have voiced impatience with Obama's foreign policy. But this time, all but one Republican voted for him, and all but one Democrat voted against him. Foreign policy used to be one of Obama's political strengths. But since June, his…

  • Commentary posted May 19, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. TTIP: small upside, big downside

    One of the best things about the debate between believers in the free market over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), the so-called US-EU free trade area, is that it cuts to the heart of a larger question: how do we advance freedom in practice? A lot of opponents of TTIP on the left (and some on the right) reject it either because they hate free…

  • Commentary posted May 18, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. They Said It Couldn’t Be Done

    London The smart money said there was no way the Conservatives could win a majority in last Thursday’s general election in Britain. On the left, the New Statesman’s widely followed May2015 blog offered a cogent argument that there would be a blocking majority even against any repeat of the Conservative-led coalition government. On the right, columnist Matthew Parris…

  • Commentary posted May 13, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A very British shock result and what it may mean

    I’ve studied Britain for 20 years, but this last week gave me an appreciation for its politics I’ve never had before. Over the last seven days, I followed Conservative candidates in Darlington, Bradford West and Brent Central as they canvassed and addressed the public. All worked hard; all were worthy, and all were in tough constituencies. In the end, none won. Like…

  • Commentary posted April 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Which side is Obama on in Mideast?

    Every war poses a basic question: Whom do you want to win? After six years, the Obama administration's answer to that question in the Middle East is hopelessly confused. We liberated Iraq from Saddam Hussein and then abandoned it, because President Barack Obama thought he had a better plan: Turn the job of stabilizing the Middle East over to Shia Iran and Sunni Saudi…

  • Commentary posted April 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Election reveals a battle for Britain’s true liberal soul

    The debates between the party leaders have made one thing clear. The election isn’t just a struggle between the Tories, Labour, and the rest. It’s a moment that reveals the state of British liberalism. By liberalism, I don’t mean the nanny-statism that today passes for liberalism, with its identity group politics, its ravenous appetite for state spending in the name of…

  • Commentary posted April 6, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. 'Tent' membership has its problems

    The nuclear deal with Iran announced by President Barack Obama on Thursday is a mirage -- an agreement now to agree later. But it stands for something bigger: the belief that it's better to have the bad guys inside the tent than out of it. As the president put it last year, he believes that, if only Iran would limit its nuclear program, it would be "a very successful…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Conservatives and liberals need to rethink their Mideast priorities

    In the wake of Benjamin Netanyahu's victory in Israel, American leaders -- both conservatives and liberals -- should rethink their approach to the Middle East. Conservatives need to recognize more clearly who our enemies are; liberals need to learn to recognize our friends. Over the last six years, conservatives have made two errors regarding the Middle East. First,…

  • Backgrounder posted March 16, 2015 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Dean Cheng, Brian Slattery, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Michaela Dodge, Luke Coffey, David Inserra, Charles "Cully" Stimson 10 Objectives for the FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act

    The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) is a central piece of legislation for Congress each year. Not only has the NDAA been passed 53 years in a row, it is one of the last remaining bills that enjoys true bipartisan consensus. The annual legislation has been able to rise above the political fray in part because Congress understands the critical need to set defense…