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  • Commentary posted April 6, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. 'Tent' membership has its problems

    The nuclear deal with Iran announced by President Barack Obama on Thursday is a mirage -- an agreement now to agree later. But it stands for something bigger: the belief that it's better to have the bad guys inside the tent than out of it. As the president put it last year, he believes that, if only Iran would limit its nuclear program, it would be "a very successful…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Conservatives and liberals need to rethink their Mideast priorities

    In the wake of Benjamin Netanyahu's victory in Israel, American leaders -- both conservatives and liberals -- should rethink their approach to the Middle East. Conservatives need to recognize more clearly who our enemies are; liberals need to learn to recognize our friends. Over the last six years, conservatives have made two errors regarding the Middle East. First,…

  • Backgrounder posted March 16, 2015 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Dean Cheng, Brian Slattery, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Michaela Dodge, Luke Coffey, David Inserra, Charles "Cully" Stimson 10 Objectives for the FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act

    The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) is a central piece of legislation for Congress each year. Not only has the NDAA been passed 53 years in a row, it is one of the last remaining bills that enjoys true bipartisan consensus. The annual legislation has been able to rise above the political fray in part because Congress understands the critical need to set defense…

  • Commentary posted March 9, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A slap fight with a purpose

    The political slap fight over Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's recent address to Congress was an embarrassment. But it was far from pointless. It reflected the fundamental divide between liberals and conservatives on Middle East policy. When leaders of democracies visit the United States, they should be received with respect. That doesn't preclude vigorous,…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanisms: An Important Feature of High-Quality Trade Agreements

    One of the most important—albeit controversial—components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) trade agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) is the provision creating an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism. The French Senate has unanimously called for the removal of this provision both from the TTIP…

  • Commentary posted February 10, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In the Middle East, let's support our friends

    King Abdullah II of Jordan is angry. In a meeting with members of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, he quoted Clint Eastwood in promising retribution against the Islamist radicals who burned a Jordanian pilot to death. He wants our support. He should get it. Here's my cardinal rule of foreign policy: Back your friends. Right now, the United States…

  • Commentary posted January 29, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Firearms Makers Are So Worried Even as The Second Amendment Is Stronger than Ever

    The Shot Show — Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoor Trade Show — is the world’s largest gun show. Held annually in Las Vegas, it’s intended for those in the trade, not the general public. Walking its almost 16 miles of booths is a near-marathon feat of endurance, and every mile exhibits more firepower than all the armies of the ancient world combined. But despite their…

  • Commentary posted January 26, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Barack Obama finally offers a clear choice

    Let's be grateful to President Barack Obama. In his State of the Union address, he dropped the pretense of bipartisanship and, by siding with the progressives, gave the nation what it needs: a clear choice. That's the true American way. One of the most tiresome things about the first six years of President Obama's tenure was his fake bipartisanship. He often offered to…

  • Commentary posted January 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The closing chapter of a not so special relationship?

    The White House announced Prime Minister David Cameron’s two-day visit to Washington in a statement issued last Saturday. It was a tellingly low-key announcement for an Anglo-American relationship that has mostly drifted in the past five years. The alliance, though, does have one big idea up its sleeve. Unfortunately, it’s a bad one. It’s entirely possible that this will…

  • Commentary posted January 15, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. No, Senate Republicans Aren’t Blocking Reasonable Treaties

    Those nasty Republicans are at it again. Dennis Jett, former U.S. ambassador to Mozambique and Peru, writes in The New Republic that GOP senators are blocking “even the most reasonable international treaties.” As opposed, apparently, to that mythical entity, the domestic treaty. The ambassador proclaims the virtues of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which will somehow…

  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Top Five Policy Priorities for Europe in 2015

    The United States faces mounting challenges in Europe in 2015. Russia is on the march in Ukraine, many of America’s oldest allies question its commitment to transatlantic security, and the economies of Europe have still not fully recovered from the Euro crisis. In addition, the specter of Islamist terrorism has raised its ugly head again in Europe, with the brutal slaying…

  • Issue Brief posted January 13, 2015 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. David Cameron’s Visit to Washington: An Important Opportunity to Renew Anglo–American Leadership

    President Barack Obama will host British Prime Minister David Cameron at the White House on January 15–16. This will be Cameron’s last visit to the United States before the U.K.’s general election on May 7, 2015. Five issues should dominate the visit: (1) Russia’s aggression in Eastern Europe; (2) the crisis in Iran and the Levant; (3) the future of the U.K. inside the…

  • Commentary posted January 12, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. On North Korea, a one-shot's not enough

    The media is under assault in the United States and abroad. The terrorist attacks in France are more shocking, but the cyberwar on Sony is more dangerous: none of us are isolated from the Internet. The Obama administration's response to the Sony hack pointed in the right direction, but it wasn't enough. One of the problems with cyber-attacks is that it's hard to know…

  • Commentary posted January 8, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Quest for legacy leads Obama to Castro’s door

    The second term of a US presidency usually goes worse than the first. Lyndon Johnson had Vietnam, George W Bush had Iraq, and – because the 1990s was a clownish decade – Bill Clinton had Monica Lewinski. The first two years of President Obama’s final term have been a failure. With the mid-term elections now over, his hunt for a legacy has begun. After the mid-terms, my…

  • Commentary posted January 2, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Three questions worth asking for 2015

    The best way to get ahead in the world is to predict the future. Unfortunately, to paraphrase author and humorist Douglas Adams, people who make predictions usually end up looking very dead, very silly or both. So instead of predicting, ask questions. You won't get answers, but you'll be better prepared when the unexpected happens. Here's what I'm asking questions about…