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  • Special Report posted August 26, 2015 by James M. Roberts, William T. Wilson, Ph.D. 2015 Global Agenda for Economic Freedom

    Introduction The Index of Economic Freedom, published annually by The Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal, is entering its third decade with the publication of the 21st edition. Since the first edition the world has witnessed profound advances in the cause of freedom. Open economies have led the world in a startling burst of innovation and economic growth,…

  • Issue Brief posted August 21, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. The U.S. Must Uphold the Arms Trade Treaty’s Limits at the First Conference of States Parties

    The first Conference of States Parties (CSP) to the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) will be held in Cancun, Mexico, on August 24–27, 2015. This CSP will establish the rules of procedure for this and all future CSPs, decide how to organize and fund the treaty secretariat, adopt procedures for the reporting mandated by the treaty, and perhaps begin the campaign to amend the treaty.…

  • News Releases on August 20, 2015 Heritage Mourns Loss of Whitney Ball and Peter Schramm

    WASHINGTON, August 20, 2015 - Heritage President Jim DeMint and Founder Edwin Feulner issued the following statement yesterday regarding the deaths of Whitney Ball and Peter Schramm. It is a day of deep mourning at the Heritage Foundation. America has lost two dedicated patriots, and the Liberty Movement has lost two of its great visionary builders. It’s hard to think…

  • Issue Brief posted August 20, 2015 by Lisa Curtis Sri Lankan Poll Results Augur Well for Relations with the U.S.

    Monday’s parliamentary elections in Sri Lanka will bring to power a coalition government headed by Ranil Wickremesinghe’s United National Party (UNP), which is expected to continue democratic reforms and efforts toward ethnic reconciliation that were started six months ago. This is welcome news for the U.S., which has been pressing Colombo to improve the human rights of…

  • Backgrounder posted August 20, 2015 by Nicolas Loris Why Congress Should Pull the Plug on the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    After the Arab oil embargo and the creation of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) in the 1970s, the United States and countries around the world felt a need to hold more oil inventories for emergencies. The U.S. joined the International Energy Agency (IEA) in November 1974 to coordinate a multi-lateral response to oil supply shocks. As part of that…

  • Issue Brief posted August 19, 2015 by James L. Gattuso Europe’s Latest Export to America: Internet Censorship

    American Web users’ access to Internet content may soon be limited, thanks to a recent decision by French regulators. France’s National Commission on Informatics and Liberties (known by its French acronym CNIL) ordered Google to apply the European Union’s bizarre “right-to-be-forgotten” rules on a global basis in a June ruling. The search engine announced at the end of…

  • Backgrounder posted August 18, 2015 by Curtis S. Dubay An Innovation Box for the U.S.? Congress Should Focus on Business Tax Reform Instead

    There is growing talk of Congress pursuing tax reform through the creation of an “innovation box” instead of focusing on broad business tax reform. This would be a mistake. An innovation box, often called a patent box in Europe, offers lower tax on certain types of income derived from intellectual property, or IP. Earlier this year, it seemed possible Congress and…

  • Issue Brief posted August 17, 2015 by Daniel Kochis Poland: The Lynchpin of Security on NATO’s Front Lines

    While Moscow’s aggressive actions have changed the way many in NATO view the threat posed by Russia, NATO’s eastern members have long considered Russia an existential threat and have planned accordingly. Poland, because of its large size, geographic location, and historical experience has become the lynchpin of security in Eastern Europe since joining NATO in 1999. The…

  • Special Report posted August 17, 2015 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Washington, China, and the Rise of the Renminbi: Are the Dollar’s Days as the Global Reserve Currency Numbered?

    The U.S. dollar has dominated the international monetary system for approximately 70 years. While the U.S. economy has generated weak growth over the past six years and accumulated a large sovereign debt, the dollar’s status as an international medium of exchange and reserve currency (currency held by foreign central banks) has defied the odds and has not diminished. On…

  • Issue Brief posted August 14, 2015 by Nicolas Loris Four Big Problems with the Obama Administration’s Climate Change Regulations

    A few years ago, cap-and-trade legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions failed to reach President Barack Obama’s desk because constituents gave their Members an earful that cap and trade would amount to a massive energy tax. When the bill died in Congress, President Obama said that there was more than “one way of skinning a cat,” and here it is.[1] The Obama…

  • Issue Brief posted August 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey The Perfect Opportunity to Advance the U.S.–Georgian Defense Relationship

    U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter will meet with his Georgian counterpart, Tinatin Khidasheli, the week of August 17. Having recently been appointed as defense minister (and the first female defense minister in Georgia’s history), this will be Khidasheli’s first meeting at the Pentagon in her new role. Georgia has been a steadfast ally of the United States, and…

  • Issue Brief posted August 10, 2015 by Olivia Enos A Call to Review Evaluation Methods in the Trafficking in Persons Report

    The 2015 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) report has recently come under fire for upgrading the rankings of Malaysia and Cuba. Speculation about the political motives behind these seemingly unwarranted upgrades has highlighted broader challenges plaguing the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, namely the difficulty of defending the objectivity of the…

  • First Principles Series Report posted August 7, 2015 by Carson Holloway Hamiltonian Constitutional Interpretation: In Defense of Energetic and Limited Government

    An essential part of contemporary American conservatism’s mission is the preservation of the Constitution as a charter of limited government. The Constitution, conservatives emphasize, limits the scope of the national government’s powers even as it grants it those powers. That is, conservatives insist that the Constitution’s enumeration of powers granted to the national…

  • Issue Brief posted August 7, 2015 by Justin T. Johnson 2016 National Defense Authorization Act: Stuck on Compensation and Retirement Reform

    Both the House of Representatives and the Senate have passed versions of the fiscal year (FY) 2016 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). The two chambers are now negotiating a final bill, but according to press reports, the negotiators are stuck on the details of a major military compensation and retirement reform proposal. Both chambers of Congress included a…

  • Backgrounder posted August 6, 2015 by David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D. The Head Start CARES Demonstration: Another Failed Federal Early Childhood Education Program

    Calls for the federal government to fund universal preschool programs and expand early childhood education programs seem to never cease. The two small-scale studies—of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Project begun in 1962 and the Carolina Abecedarian Project begun in 1972—that were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of such interventions are now outdated.[1] Their…