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  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Is Trade with China a Factor in Rising Mortality among Middle-Age White Men?

    In the aftermath of a presidential election that brought intense scrutiny to white, working-class voters in small towns, a new working paper in economics seeks to explain how at least two symptoms of social decline–suicide and substance abuse–relate to trade with China. The authors, Federal Reserve economist Justin R. Pierce and Peter K. Schott of the Yale School of…

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Paul Winfree, Brian Blase How to Repeal Obamacare: A Road Map for the GOP

    Over the past few years, pundits have dismissed the Republican Party’s chances of repealing and replacing Obamacare. But with President-elect Donald Trump’s victory Tuesday and the GOP’s successful effort to keep control of Congress, conservatives now have a real chance to eliminate the health care law. The question is how to do it. Three years into its implementation,…

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Alden Abbott Justice Department Ignores the Benefits of Contracting Freedom in its Crabbed Reading of Music Distribution Decrees

    The Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) ignored sound law and economics principles in its August 4 decision announcing a new interpretation of seventy-five year-old music licensing consent decrees it had entered into separately with the two major American “performing rights organizations” (PROs)  —  the American Society of Composers, Authors, and…

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by John Malcolm Book Review: The War on Cops

    In The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe, Heather Mac Donald, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, offers a scathing, data-driven account of the misguided and sometimes malicious attacks on the law enforcement community that are spreading like kudzu across the country—and of their consequences. Indeed, as I write this, reports out…

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Alden Abbott Acting AAG’s Policy Speech Sends the Wrong Signals on Antitrust Enforcement (or “a Wild Ride Back to the Fifties and Sixties”)

    In a September 20 speech at the high profile Georgetown Global Antitrust Enforcement Symposium, Acting Assistant Attorney General Renata Hesse sent the wrong signals to the business community and to foreign enforcers (see here) regarding U.S. antitrust policy.  Admittedly, a substantial part of her speech was a summary of existing U.S. antitrust doctrine.  In certain…

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Alden Abbott Patents as a Key to Commercialization: Guidance for Patent-Antitrust Analysis

    Public comments on the proposed revision to the joint U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) – U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Antitrust-IP Licensing Guidelines have, not surprisingly, focused primarily on fine points of antitrust analysis carried out by those two federal agencies (see, for example, the thoughtful recommendations by the Global Antitrust Institute, here). …

  • Commentary posted November 29, 2016 by Alden Abbott Global Antitrust Institute’s Comments on Draft DOJ-FTC IP Guidelines are on the Mark

    The Global Antitrust Institute (GAI) at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School released today a set of comments on the joint U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) – Federal Trade Commission (FTC) August 12 Proposed Update to their 1995 Antitrust Guidelines for the Licensing of Intellectual Property (Proposed Update).  As has been the case with previous GAI filings…

  • Commentary on November 23, 2016 Heritage Helps Lead Fight Against Criminalization of Scientific Dissent on Climate Change

    The Heritage Foundation is helping to lead the fight against the criminalization of scientific dissent on the unproven and questionable theory of man-induced, catastrophic climate change. Heritage experts on energy and the environment—Daren Bakst, David Kreutzer, Diane Katz, Nick Loris, Jack Spencer, Katie Tubb, and Kevin Dayaratna —have provided comprehensive research…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. China's Huge 'One Belt, One Road' Initiative Is Sweeping Central Asia

    Having overbuilt in many domestic industries—such as coal, cement and even solar panels—the Chinese government is redirecting its capital abroad. The aim is to reduce excessive industrial capacity at home while increasing financial returns. U.S. policymakers ought to be watching this very closely. One of Beijing’s most ambitious foreign economic development initiatives…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Has Hong Kong's Economy Peaked?

    From 1981 to 2015, Hong Kong sustained an annual growth rate of almost 5 percent, despite numerous global recessions. It was a testament to the power of economic freedom. For twenty-one consecutive years, The Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom has ranked Hong Kong’s economy as the freest in the world—and for good reason. The overall tax burden is only 15.7…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2016 by William T. Wilson, Ph.D. Uber Forced out of China

    Earlier this week, ride-boking giant Uber sold its Chinese operations to China’s ride-booking service Didi Chuxing. Didi will acquire all of Uber’s China’s operations. In only seven years, U.S.-based Uber has become an enormous commercial and global success. It is the most funded start-up company of all time. At $62.5 billion, the private car-sharing firm is now…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2016 by Bruce Klingner What Does Donald Trump's Victory Mean for Asia?

    Trying to predict the incoming Trump Administration’s policy toward Asia is difficult if not impossible at this point. We are in uncharted territory since Trump made a number of campaign statements that ran counter to the bipartisan post-World War II framework of U.S. foreign policy of internationalism, American commitment to its allies, and free trade agreements. His…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2016 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Sorry, but the Accurate Legal Term is 'Illegal Alien'

    The College Fix is reporting that the politically correct Rutgers University student newspaper, the Daily Targum, has fired columnist Aviv Khavich for trying to use the term “illegal alien” in a column about illegal immigration. After he complained to his editor that she had changed illegal alien” to “undocumented immigrant” in a column he submitted, he was…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2016 by Alden Abbott ICN Advocacy Workshop a Success

    On November 1st and 2nd, Cofece, the Mexican Competition Agency, hosted an International Competition Network (ICN) workshop on competition advocacy, featuring presentations from government agency officials, think tanks, and international organizations.  The workshop highlighted the excellent work that the ICN has done in supporting efforts to curb the most serious source…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2016 by Alden Abbott The FTC, not the FCC, Should Regulate Internet Privacy

    In an October 25 blog commentary posted at this site, Geoffrey Manne and Kristian Stout argued against a proposed Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ban on the use of mandatory arbitration clauses in internet service providers’ consumer service agreements.  This proposed ban is just one among many unfortunate features in the latest misguided effort by the Federal…