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  • Commentary posted July 28, 2015 by Rachel Sheffield, Christine Kim We can’t ignore culture if we want America to thrive

    A thriving society needs a strong economy. The reverse is just as true: A healthy economy is built on a vibrant culture that promotes individual and social well-being. It’s helpful to think of a society as an ecosystem — one in which cultural, political and economic spheres greatly overlap. As in any ecosystem, change in one sector reverberates across the entire…

  • Commentary posted July 28, 2015 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Creating a case for conservatism

    Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you’re a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin — or learn to keep quiet. Sadly, you get used to having your motives impugned by people who assume that no one could…

  • Commentary posted July 28, 2015 by Justin T. Johnson Cut defense spending because...?

    Here we go again. An editorial last week in Bloomberg View argued for steep cuts in national security spending. While much of the editorial supported important reform efforts that will be carried in the National Defense Authorization Act, it never bothered to explain why the spending cuts are necessary. Indeed, the only rationale offered was the observation that national…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by James L. Gattuso Amazon and antitrust: Should Washington sue to make books more expensive?

    As Americans set out to the beach this summer with their favorite novels in hand, federal officials are being asked to sue the nation's largest bookseller, Amazon.com. Why? For not having higher prices. A group of authors and competing booksellers recently petitioned the Department of Justice to open an antitrust investigation into the activities of the online retailer.…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Original Member of Bin Laden’s Band Killed in Strike

    The U.S. military claims to have killed Muhsin al-Fadhli in Syria.  A one-time associate of Osama bin Laden, he is reported to have headed a network called the Khorasan Group, responsible for planning al Qaeda’s terrorist attacks on the West. Well, at least we think he is dead. This is the second time the U.S. has claimed to have killed Muhsin al-Fadhli. Also, no word if…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by Ryan T. Anderson, Ph.D. Making The Case For Traditional Parenting

    Over the weekend, John Farrell published an odd critique of an essay of mine that ran at First Things. The essay is an excerpt from my new book, Truth Overruled: The Future of Marriage and Religious Freedom. In the book, I argue on the basis of philosophy, social science and public policy that the judicial redefinition of marriage will have negative consequences for our…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. All the way with LBJ and Obama

    Count on it: When it comes to foreign policy, two-term presidents -- and even most one-term presidents -- will change course along the way. Since 1933, only two have not: Lyndon Johnson, who rode the Vietnam War all the way down, and Barack Obama. That's not a good sign. Consider the record. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in 1933, he began by torpedoing…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. When Autos Attack

    A couple of months ago, DARPA Dan made news during a 60 Minutes profile when he showed how scientists could hack into a car’s computer, making it move independently of the driver. Senator Ed Markey got so worked up that he announced new proposed legislation to set standards for “protection against digital attacks and privacy.” Well, this ought to get Markey excited. It…

  • Commentary posted July 27, 2015 by Joshua Meservey Sermonizing With Al Shabab: The Terrorist Group's New Tactic

    On May 19, members of the Somali terrorist group al Shabab entered Hulugho village in eastern Kenya and herded all the villagers they could find into a mosque. Al Shabab has entered Kenyan towns before, usually in a frenzy of murder and arson, before withdrawing into the bush. Hulugho seemed set to suffer a similar fate. This time, however, the gunmen merely delivered a…

  • Commentary posted July 24, 2015 by Jennifer A. Marshall, Christine Kim Tracking opportunity for all

    "Opportunity for all" is a goal Americans from across the political spectrum can embrace. But it won't be more than an aspiration unless we know whether we're making progress toward that goal. To do that, as the management adage says, we need to measure what matters. That means taking stock of the social and economic factors shaping opportunity in America today. That's…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. We Should Hunt Terrorists Online -- Since That's Where They Now Operate

    Used to be that, when a crime occurred, investigators would flood the crime scene. Now, they race to access the perpetrator’s footprint in digital space. Often, that’s where they’ll find the most crucial clues. And that’s why the FBI wants to know everything Chattanooga shooter Mohammad Youssef Abdulazeez did online. Digital tracing has proved particularly important in…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2015 by Peter Brookes Problems with Iran likely to worsen with pact

    It turns out the Iran nuke deal is a lot like the guy or gal you spy across the room at a dimly-lit party who from afar seems quite alluring — that is, until you get closer and realize the object of your affection isn’t what you had hoped for. Not by a long stretch. For instance, the original idea of a nuclear agreement with Tehran started out with the goal of Iran…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2015 by Lisa Curtis Can Pakistan succeed in its quest to reconcile conflicting regional interests?

    Ahead of the inevitable withdrawal of US and NATO forces from Afghanistan and the ensuing shift in the regional power balance, Pakistan is striving to position itself in an arena of conflicting interests. As well as consolidating historical ties with China, Islamabad wants to stay in with long-standing Gulf ally, Saudi Arabia and buddy up with new regional influencers,…

  • Commentary posted July 22, 2015 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Minority Report? It’s Not Science Fiction in NYC

    In the future, top cop Tom Cruise uses sci-fi technology to single out and arrest violent criminals before they commit a crime. The 2002 hit movie seemed like such a super cool idea that Fox is bringing the concept back as a series starting in September. But the cautionary tale, originally penned by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in 1956, may be more than science…

  • Commentary posted July 22, 2015 by James Phillips The Iran deal: A diplomatic speed hump

    The Obama administra­tion made a risky gamble when it signed the flawed nuclear agreement with Iran. Washington squan­dered its bargaining leverage and settled for a deal that could dan­gerously undermine the long-term national security interests of the United States and its allies. US President Barack Obama entered the negotiations pledg­ing to cut off all pathways to a…