• Heritage Action
  • More
  • Commentary posted October 23, 2014 by Stephen Moore The Real Reason Gas Prices are Falling

    American workers and motorists got some badly-needed relief this week when the price of oil plunged to its lowest level in years. The oil price has fallen by about 20 to 25 percent since its peak back in June of $105 a barrel. This is translating to lower prices at the pump with many states now below $3 a gallon. At present levels, these Already the lower oil and gas…

  • Commentary posted October 23, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Shades of Jim Crow at the Justice Department

    Attorney General Eric Holder has waged a litigation war against voter-ID laws as well as state efforts to reduce early-voting periods and eliminate same-day voter registration. These practical reforms, he huffs, are intended to suppress the votes of minorities. But the lawsuit filed by the Department of Justice and a number of civil-rights groups against North Carolina…

  • Commentary posted October 23, 2014 by Genevieve Wood It's What You do With Political Victory That Counts

    Does it matter which political party controls Congress come 2015? Turn on any news program covering the mid-term election and you'll get a steady stream of "horse-race" reports: which candidates are up, which are down, how many seats are leaning Democrat or now safely in the hands of the GOP. Pollster after pollster will eagerly tell you how many Senate seats each…

  • Commentary posted October 22, 2014 by Stephen Moore Oil, the Real Economic Stimulus

    American workers and motorists got some badly needed relief last week when the price of oil plunged to its lowest level in years. The oil price has fallen by about 20 percent since its peak back in June of $105 a barrel. This is translating to lower prices at the pump with many states now below $3 a gallon. Already the lower oil and gas prices are the equivalent of a…

  • Commentary posted October 22, 2014 by Bruce Klingner Steadying Allied Defenses in Korea

    A quarter century after the Cold War ended everywhere else, North Korea is still going strong. Why, then, have the United States and South Korea been planning to weaken their military alliance through a flawed policy known as “OpCon transfer”? Bilateral negotiations in Washington this week are a good opportunity to shelve such plans indefinitely. Observers routinely…

  • Commentary posted October 22, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Showing Proper ID is a Fact of Life

    If you’ve ever tried to board a plane, cash a check or rent a car, you’ve almost surely had to show some form of identification with your picture on it. For most people, that takes the form of a driver’s license, but there are other forms of photo ID. Millions of Americans produce them every day to do dozens of everyday tasks and think nothing of it. Why should it be…

  • Commentary posted October 22, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky How Will Voting Litigation Affect the Upcoming Elections?

    With less than three weeks to go before the midterm election, the decisions in the courts, including the Supreme Court, on the procedural rules that will govern the election keep on coming on an almost daily basis. This has been pretty much the norm since the 2000 elections, as liberals and progressives have used the courts — rather than the legislative process — to try…

  • Commentary posted October 21, 2014 by Brittany Corona One More Reason States Should Reject Common Core

    The reach of Common Core national education standards and tests has moved beyond public school walls. Last month a home-schooling family in New Jersey received a letter from Westfield Public School District superintendent Margaret Dolanthe. It outlined what she said was district home-school policy requiring families to "submit a letter of intent (to home-school) and an…

  • Commentary posted October 21, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. From Libya to Ebola, Obama Administration Talks Big but Acts Small

    The Obama administration has responded to the Ebola epidemic by talking big. It does that well. From the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti to Syria's use of chemical weapons in 2013, the administration has made a lot of splashy responses. But making a splash isn't the same as being serious. Take the Haitian earthquake, which killed more than 300,000 people. The initial…

  • Commentary posted October 21, 2014 by David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D. Studies Confirm: Death Penalties Deter Many Murders at Far Less Cost

    On September 17, Texas executed Lisa Coleman for murdering a 9-year-old child. Death penalty opponents argue that, even in the most heinous cases, executions are just too costly, and that society would do better to substitute life-without-parole sentences for lethal injections. Before examining the death penalty’s costs and benefits, though, let’s consider why Coleman…

  • Commentary posted October 20, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D., William Inboden, Ph.D. The U.S. Needs a New Foreign Policy Agenda for 2016 (Part Four)

    In our three previous installments we discussed how President Obama's six year experiment in retrenching American power has failed. It has created more global disorder, magnified threats to American security, and has shifted America's strategic posture in damaging ways that diminish our ability to shape the international environment. We also took stock of America's…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Vouching for the Visa Waiver Program

    “We are in a dangerous place in the world, perhaps more dangerous than in the past 10 years.” That’s what former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff had to say when he visited the Heritage Foundation recently. With reports of terrorist groups such as the Islamic State, often referred to as ISIS, all over the news, it’s not hard to see why. As Mr.…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez How Hong Kong’s History Set The Stage For Today’s Protests

    September 4, 1839 Start of the First Opium War between China and Great Britain. Although some historians and figures at the time, including our sixth president John Quincy Adams, believed this war was over free trade, it has always been China’s position that it was unfairly waged over the right to let Britain sell opium in China. Canton Commissioner Lin Tse-Hsu wrote…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Dean Cheng Xi Jinping’s First Real Crisis: The Hong Kong Challenge

    As the world turned its eyes to the mass protests in Hong Kong, it focused primarily on how the territory will elect its chief executive. The people who have taken to the streets of Hong Kong’s central business and government districts are ostensibly protesting Beijing’s decision to dictate the slate of candidates for which the citizenry of Hong Kong may cast their…

  • Commentary posted October 16, 2014 by Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Let's Fully Devalue the Devaluation Idea, Once and For All

    Many bad ideas survive as urban legends. No field is immune, economics included. The list goes on: Unions care more about consumers than about their own members. Minimum wage laws don’t raise the cost of hiring low-skilled workers. Keynesian stimulus policies have worked wonders in the past. And so on. The latest bad idea that refuses to die is that countries should…