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  • Commentary posted September 11, 2014 by Stephen Moore In Japan's Economic Folly, A Lesson For U.S.

    Japan is flush with national pride this week, thanks to Kei Nishikori, the tennis phenom who knocked off seemingly indestructible Novak Djokovic to reach the U.S. Open finals and become the first Japanese to reach a grand slam final ever. If only Japan's economy could perform half as well. For also this week, Tokyo announced that second-quarter GDP shrank by an…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A society sickened by welfare

    Congress has returned to Washington, but not for long. The looming midterm elections mean that lawmakers are here only for what USA Today calls “a three-week sprint” before they’re back out to campaign. That, in an age of growing dependency on government, means voters can expect to hear more pandering. ‘Tis the season for promises of government largesse. The critical…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Murderers more appropriate than Islamic State

    The murderers of journalists Steven Sotloff and James Foley call themselves the Islamic State. And commentators reliably repeat that name. That's wrong -- and dangerous. The Islamist terrorists of the Middle East don't want to make a state. They want to break states. In 1996, Osama bin Laden condemned the United States for dividing the Muslim community "into small and…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Anthony B. Kim, Brett D. Schaefer Why are we aiding countries that oppose U.S. priorities at the United Nations?

    Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick was frustrated. Countries happily took American foreign aid, but then blithely opposed U.S. initiatives and priorities in the United Nations. They took U.S. aid for granted because previous opposition hadn’t affected U.S. aid decisions and, instead, yielded to pressure from other countries to present regional solidarity and overwhelmingly…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Jim DeMint Let the Ex-Im Bank expire

    In recent months, an obscure but controversial federal agency called the Export-Import Bank has made headlines across the country. The 80-year-old, taxpayer-funded institution unexpectedly finds itself fighting for its life. The Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im for short) was created during the Depression to make loans to the Soviet Union so it could buy American products. This…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by Hans A. von Spakovsky John Chisholm, other prosecutors put free speech at risk in John Doe case

    Oral arguments were heard Tuesday before the 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in O'Keefe vs. Chisholm, the so-called John Doe investigation in which local prosecutors in Wisconsin tried to criminalize political speech and activity on public issues. The 7th Circuit should uphold the lower court decision halting this Star Chamber investigation that violated basic First…

  • Commentary posted September 10, 2014 by James Phillips The message ISIS wants to send to America, the world

    The grisly propaganda videos released by Islamist terrorists of the executions of innocent American hostages are coldly calculated to intimidate the terrorist group’s enemies, inspire its followers and incite further attacks against the United States and our allies. The Islamic State (formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria or ISIS) considers the videos a…

  • Commentary posted September 9, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Why Obama Needs a Strategy for Saving Jordan

    President Obama’s recent press conference sparked a firestorm of concern over the state of his strategy for dealing with ISIS. But ISIS isn’t the only Middle East challenge deserving some well-thought-out “strategery.” The administration also needs to craft a solid, sustainable plan for supporting the people of Jordan. On the surface, the fate of Jordan may not appear to…

  • Commentary posted September 9, 2014 by Genevieve Wood Undocumented children a drain on U.S. schools

    This year, more than 50,000 unaccompanied children have crossed the southern border into the U.S. If you're wondering where they've gone, you may need to look no further than the classrooms of your local public school. On May 8, the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Justice sent a letter to local and state school officials around the country making…

  • Commentary posted September 9, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez For Hispanics, the Lone Star State beats the Golden one

    The world provides us with countless case studies on the relative merits of free markets and central planning. In Asia and Europe we have seen the controlled experiments of the Koreas and the two postwar Germanys, admittedly extreme examples. In South America, we have consistently successful Chile and perennially chaotic Argentina. In this country, we have Texas and…

  • Commentary posted September 8, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. The encouraging rise in school choice

    America is built on the philosophy of bootstrapping, or pulling yourself up through your own talents and abilities. No tool is better suited for doing that than a good education. For years, however, a good primary and secondary education has been increasingly difficult to find. But I’m happy to report, at the start of another school year, that an encouraging trend is…

  • Commentary posted September 8, 2014 by Peter Brookes Wolves at NATO’s door

    Today’s NATO Summit in Wales, where the leaders of 28 European and North American countries, including the United States, will meet to address pressing security challenges, is arguably the most important in a generation. Why? The wolves are at the door. The NATO allies must find a way to deal successfully with both Russia’s muscle-flexing in Eastern Europe and the…

  • Commentary posted September 8, 2014 by Andrew Kloster, James Sherk Why Your City or Town Could Be the Next Step for Right-to-Work

    Should workers have to pay union dues to keep their job? Unions think so — their contracts require companies to fire workers who do not pay up. Fortunately, many states have passed “right-to-work” (RTW) laws that prohibit this coercion. Unions, however, have blocked right-to-work in 26 states, but this doesn’t mean that unionized workers in these states must pay up. In…

  • Commentary posted September 8, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. A Really Bad Bargain: A U.S.-Iranian "Strategic Relationship"

    One of the lessons of statecraft is that mistakes tend to compound themselves. Good options disappear and bad ones proliferate. The hole is dug deeper because desperation convinces you to contemplate options that would never have been considered in better times. This is what I fear may happen next in Iraq. Because we have so few good options, the Obama administration may…

  • Commentary posted September 8, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Barack Obama undermines immigration reform

    Is it possible to have a debate on border security and immigration reform that doesn’t descend into an unproductive shouting match? Yes. I’ve been involved in many such debates all across the country, and none of them proved contentious. In each case the discussion started by identifying the points all sides could agree on. Imagine if Washington tried that. Congress and…