• Heritage Action
  • More

Ukraine

Our Research & Offerings on Ukraine
Find more work on Ukraine
  • Issue Brief posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Luke Coffey, Dakota Wood If Russia Attacks: How the U.S. Should Respond to Further Aggression Against Ukraine

    After Russia’s illegal invasion, occupation, and subsequent annexation of Crimea, there is a concern that Moscow will not stop until all of Ukraine is under Russia’s control. By invading Crimea, the regime of President Vladimir Putin has made it impossible any longer to consider Russia a responsible nation or suitable partner for the United States in solving regional and…

  • Backgrounder posted October 21, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Why the U.S. Should Support Ukraine’s Association and Free Trade Agreements with Europe

    On August 17, 2013, the Kyiv-based website Ukraine Today published a document summarizing the Kremlin’s strategy on how to force Ukraine to join Russia’s sphere of influence.[1] The Russian strategy, which the Kremlin has not disavowed, is designed to pressure Ukraine into joining a Moscow-led Customs Union (which currently includes Belarus and Kazakhstan). The strategy…

  • Commentary posted March 9, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Ukraine crisis will make Iran's mullahs more interested in nuclear weapons

    They called it the Lisbon Protocol. In 1991, the U.S. and Russia agreed to historic reductions in nuclear weapons. But there was a hitch: Russia didn't exactly own all of its nukes. When the Soviet Union collapsed, lots of them were left in the former vassal states of Belarus, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. Under the protocol, all the nukes from these countries would be…

  • Issue Brief posted December 13, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. The U.S. Should Lead on Ukraine

    U.S. policy toward Ukraine suffered a significant self-inflicted injury early Thursday morning when President Viktor Yanukovich dispatched riot-control teams to disperse peaceful demonstrators in the center of Kyiv, the ancient capital of Ukraine. So far, the White House and the State Department have been behind the curve on one of the most important geopolitical crises…

  • Issue Brief posted November 26, 2014 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine: The U.S. Needs a Strategy

    In November 2013, the former Ukrainian President, Viktor Yanukovych, postponed signing an Association Agreement with the European Union after receiving an ultimatum from Moscow to choose between closer ties with Europe or Russia. One year later, Yanukovych is out, a pro-Western government is in power, Russia has illegally annexed the Crimea, and the Ukrainian oblasts of…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. A Cold War Lesson For Ukraine

    There's been a lot of talk about how Russia's invasion of Crimea means a return to the Cold War. History never repeats itself exactly (it merely echoes). But there are actually some lessons from the Cold War which could be applicable to the crisis in Ukraine. The first is that facts on the ground matter. The Soviet Union occupied half of Europe after World War II more or…

  • Issue Brief posted March 27, 2014 by Michaela Dodge U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: After Ukraine, Time to Reassess Strategic Posture

    Russia recently invaded Ukraine and annexed Crimea in blatant disregard of Ukraine’s territorial sovereignty. Russia’s willingness to challenge the status quo and its disregard for its arms control obligations have important implications for U.S. nuclear weapons policy. The U.S. can take many steps to improve and strengthen its overall nuclear posture regardless of…

  • Commentary posted November 18, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Russia's Aggression Isn't Stopping in Ukraine

    NATO confirmed on Wednesday that Russian tanks were moving into rebel-controlled eastern Ukraine. But Russia's aggression under Vladimir Putin didn't begin in Ukraine and, unless the West stops vacillating, it won't end there, either. After the 2003 Rose Revolution, the nation of Georgia, in the Caucasus, became a staunch American ally. But in 2008, it was invaded and…

  • Issue Brief posted March 19, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Luke Coffey NATO Enlargement Should Top Obama Agenda in Chicago

    In May, NATO leaders will meet for the annual heads of state and government summit in Chicago. Absent from the summit’s agenda is the issue of enlargement—a pillar of the alliance. Since taking office, President Obama has done little to support the membership of qualified candidates. This year’s NATO summit provides an opportunity to correct this. NATO’s “open door…

  • Issue Brief posted May 20, 2014 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis U.S. Should Condemn Spain and France’s Military Support to the Russian Federation

    As Russia continues to occupy Crimea and back political instability in eastern Ukraine, there are some NATO members that continue to provide Russia with military support. Spain allows the Russian navy use of its ports, and France is selling two amphibious assault ships to Russia. This behavior is unbecoming of 21st-century NATO allies. The U.S. should work with…

Find more work on Ukraine
Find more work on Ukraine
Find more work on Ukraine