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Ukraine

Our Research & Offerings on Ukraine
  • Commentary posted August 19, 2014 by Peter Brookes Critical Time for Deterring Putin

    Russia could double down on Ukraine anytime now. Undeterred by the West’s questionable response to the tragic Malaysian airliner shoot-down — or the moral and material support to the Ukrainian rebels — or the carving off of Crimea, Russia seems ready to roll. News reports indicate Moscow has bumped up Russian forces near the Ukrainian border to some 20,000 troops for…

  • Commentary posted August 6, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. An Assault on Sovereignty in Israel, Ukraine

    At a conference in Israel earlier this month, the White House's Middle East coordinator, Philip Gordon, spoke the magic word: sovereignty. Unfortunately, for the White House, it's just a word. From Israel to Ukraine, today's crises show what happens when the world forgets what sovereignty requires. Speaking in Tel Aviv, Gordon urged Israel to "end the occupations and…

  • Commentary posted July 30, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. What’s at stake in Ukraine?

    What’s at stake in Ukraine? If the actions of Western governments speak louder than words, the short answer is “not much.” The full range of sanctions on Russia has not yet been imposed, and there is a widespread reluctance to embrace Ukraine too closely. But what if our reluctance is a mistake? We could end up undoing the entire post-Cold War order in Europe. It’s…

  • Commentary posted July 22, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17: Shooting Down Peace in Ukraine

    Yesterday, hundreds of innocents from all over the world lost their lives in the skies over Ukraine.  This horrible tragedy is a clear reminder of how very far from peace this part of the world remains. Only one capital can end the needless conflict. It's not Washington. It's Moscow. Before the downing of flight MH-17, many in DC had relegated the ongoing struggle in…

  • Issue Brief posted July 22, 2014 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Dakota Wood, Luke Coffey After the Malaysian Airlines Atrocity: 10 Ways the U.S. Should Respond to Russia’s Role in Ukraine

    Evidence is mounting that Russian-backed insurgents in eastern Ukraine were responsible for the shooting down of a Malaysian Airlines plane, with the loss of 298 lives. This was an act of barbarism by separatists who are armed, funded, and trained by Moscow. It follows from Russia’s illegal invasion, occupation, and annexation of Crimea and its attempts to dismember…

  • Commentary posted May 29, 2014 by Ambassador Terry Miller IMF reforms give Ukraine chance to shed past corruption

    The reforms demanded by the International Monetary Fund and European Union provide the best chance for Ukraine to overcome the legacy of socialism and corruption that have left its people impoverished and its economy the least free in Europe. Like any country populated with real people with diverse backgrounds, needs and skills, Ukraine's political and economic problems…

  • Issue Brief posted May 20, 2014 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis U.S. Should Condemn Spain and France’s Military Support to the Russian Federation

    As Russia continues to occupy Crimea and back political instability in eastern Ukraine, there are some NATO members that continue to provide Russia with military support. Spain allows the Russian navy use of its ports, and France is selling two amphibious assault ships to Russia. This behavior is unbecoming of 21st-century NATO allies. The U.S. should work with…

  • Commentary posted May 19, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Germany should help lead NATO response to Russia

    "I'd rather have a German division in front of me than a French division behind me." So quipped Gen. George "Blood & Guts" Patton. The German military machine was fearsome foe in World War II. That was then. Now is now. Following two incredibly bloody world wars, many worried that a strong Germany would always be a threat to world peace. Indeed, the division of Germany…

  • Commentary posted May 13, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Ukraine crisis highlights setbacks for nuclear ‘global zero’ campaign

    United States President Barack Obama declared in 2009, that America’s nuclear strategy would include a commitment to ‘Global Zero’ – a multinational cooperative effort dedicated to the voluntary elimination of nuclear weapons. The new approach placed reductions through arms control at the forefront of US policy. The administration’s most notable achievement was the…

  • Issue Brief posted May 12, 2014 by Luke Coffey Russian Aggression Prevention Act of 2014: Time for American Commitment to Transatlantic Security

    In light of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea and the Moscow-backed instability in eastern Ukraine, several U.S. Senators have introduced the Russian Aggression Prevention Act of 2014. The goal of the legislation is to advance a strategic U.S. response to deter Russian aggression toward Ukraine and other states in Europe and Eurasia. The bill focuses on what the U.S.…

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  • Backgrounder posted October 21, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Why the U.S. Should Support Ukraine’s Association and Free Trade Agreements with Europe

    On August 17, 2013, the Kyiv-based website Ukraine Today published a document summarizing the Kremlin’s strategy on how to force Ukraine to join Russia’s sphere of influence.[1] The Russian strategy, which the Kremlin has not disavowed, is designed to pressure Ukraine into joining a Moscow-led Customs Union (which currently includes Belarus and Kazakhstan). The strategy…

  • WebMemo posted February 12, 2010 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Khrystyna Kushnir After Ukraine Elections: What Is Next for U.S. Policy?

    On February 7, Ukrainians elected former Prime Minister Victor Yanukovych as president, a defeat for current Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. The first round of elections, held on January 17, appeared to be free and fair. The U.S. embassy and OSCE concluded that the second round of runoff elections were free and fair as well. Ukrainian courts may review some of…

  • Issue Brief posted December 13, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. The U.S. Should Lead on Ukraine

    U.S. policy toward Ukraine suffered a significant self-inflicted injury early Thursday morning when President Viktor Yanukovich dispatched riot-control teams to disperse peaceful demonstrators in the center of Kyiv, the ancient capital of Ukraine. So far, the White House and the State Department have been behind the curve on one of the most important geopolitical crises…

  • Commentary posted May 5, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Putin's Asymmetrical War on the West

    By any reasonable measure, Russia is getting the best of the West in the showdown over Ukraine. President Vladimir Putin's destabilization of that country continues apace while the United States and the Europeans are powerless to stop him, and all of this is happening despite the fact that by any reasonable measure Russia is weaker than the West. Its economy is much less…

  • Commentary posted May 29, 2014 by Ambassador Terry Miller IMF reforms give Ukraine chance to shed past corruption

    The reforms demanded by the International Monetary Fund and European Union provide the best chance for Ukraine to overcome the legacy of socialism and corruption that have left its people impoverished and its economy the least free in Europe. Like any country populated with real people with diverse backgrounds, needs and skills, Ukraine's political and economic problems…

  • Commentary posted May 13, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Ukraine crisis highlights setbacks for nuclear ‘global zero’ campaign

    United States President Barack Obama declared in 2009, that America’s nuclear strategy would include a commitment to ‘Global Zero’ – a multinational cooperative effort dedicated to the voluntary elimination of nuclear weapons. The new approach placed reductions through arms control at the forefront of US policy. The administration’s most notable achievement was the…

  • Commentary posted May 19, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Germany should help lead NATO response to Russia

    "I'd rather have a German division in front of me than a French division behind me." So quipped Gen. George "Blood & Guts" Patton. The German military machine was fearsome foe in World War II. That was then. Now is now. Following two incredibly bloody world wars, many worried that a strong Germany would always be a threat to world peace. Indeed, the division of Germany…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Ukraine’s Anti-Protest Laws: A Step Backwards in Time

    Violent clashes between police and demonstrators erupted in Kyiv, Ukraine, last weekend in the wake of new legislation effectively banning public protest. If the two sides do not take a step back from the brink, the confrontation may lead to chaos, when neither the government nor the opposition have control. The legislation, passed on January 16 by President Victor…

  • WebMemo posted September 14, 2011 by James M. Roberts, Andriy Tsintsiruk Ukraine Needs an Economic Freedom “Reset”

    Ukraine is at the crossroads of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Its global economic integration among free, democratic, and prosperous nations should be an important American foreign policy priority. A rebirth of economic freedom in Ukraine could have a positive impact not only on Eastern Europe but also in Russia and other post-Soviet states. Achieving this desirable…

  • Issue Brief posted March 19, 2012 by Morgan Lorraine Roach, Luke Coffey NATO Enlargement Should Top Obama Agenda in Chicago

    In May, NATO leaders will meet for the annual heads of state and government summit in Chicago. Absent from the summit’s agenda is the issue of enlargement—a pillar of the alliance. Since taking office, President Obama has done little to support the membership of qualified candidates. This year’s NATO summit provides an opportunity to correct this. NATO’s “open door…

Find more work on Ukraine
Find more work on Ukraine
Find more work on Ukraine