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Wisconsin

Our Research & Offerings on Wisconsin
  • Commentary posted June 8, 2012 by James Sherk Whence Walker's Win?

    The roots of Gov. Scott Walker's recall victory in Wisconsin can be traced to Springfield, Ill. The same year that Wisconsinites first elected Walker governor, protesters swarmed the Illinois capitol, yelling: "Raise my taxes! Raise my taxes!" Who protests for higher taxes? Government unions do. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees…

  • Commentary posted June 7, 2012 by James Sherk Scott Walker's Victory Shows Voters Want a Smaller Government

    Last night, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker did what no governor facing a recall election had done before: He won. Walker's victory came just over a year after he curbed the collective bargaining powers of Wisconsin's government unions. Having seen the reforms in action, voters decided they liked them. Walker's reforms prevented unions from hijacking government to serve…

  • Issue Brief posted May 31, 2012 by Jason Richwine, Ph.D. Understanding Public Pension Costs: The Example of Wisconsin

    The generosity of pensions provided to public-sector workers has come under increased scrutiny as states and local governments search for ways to close their budget deficits. The intense and ongoing battle over public-sector collective bargaining in Wisconsin, for example, is in part a conflict over the generosity of public-pension benefits. Whether reducing pension…

  • Commentary posted March 21, 2011 by Brian Darling Washington Republicans, Look to Wisconsin

    Washington Republicans, Look to Wisconsin Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s principled stand can teach Washington Republicans an important lesson in bravery.Al Aitken, a good friend of mine who is a Marine veteran and a commercial airline pilot, explained to me a few years ago the difference between courage and bravery.  Courage is taking action and not…

  • Commentary posted August 20, 2008 by Brian M. Riedl Social Security and Medicare Reform: Grading the Wisconsin Congressional Delegation's Proposals

    On July 13, the Journal Sentinel opened its pages to Wisconsin's congressional delegation. Each member weighed in on how he or she would solve the long-term Social Security and Medicare funding shortfall. As the only Wisconsinite (born and raised in Appleton) sharing the podium with David Walker on the Fiscal Wake-up Tour, I've taken the liberty of grading each…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted November 7, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D. Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11

    A few Members of Congress, motivated by American combat in the Middle East, have called for the reinstatement of a compulsory military draft. The case for coercing young citizens to join the military is supposedly based on social jus­tice?that all should serve?and seems to be but­tressed by reports of shortfalls in voluntary enlistment. In a New York Times op-ed…

  • Backgrounder posted November 2, 1993 by Dan Greenberg Should Congress Be Above the Law?

    (Archived document, may contain errors) T 965 November 2,1993 SHOULD CONGRESS BE ABOVE THE LAW Congress] can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as on the great mass of society James Madison, Federalist No. 57 It has been said here many times tonight that we want to treat Senators the same as everyone else Mr.…

  • Backgrounder posted August 3, 1990 by Michael J. McLaughlin High School Dropouts: How Much of a Crisis?

    Introduction In his first State of the Union Address, George Bush this January set six goals to strengthen American education. One of them is to reduce the national high school dropout rate to 10 percent by the end of the decade. Currently, according to Bush, the rate is 25 percent. This high rate, it is said, saddles the United States with an undereducated…

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  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted November 7, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D. Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11

    A few Members of Congress, motivated by American combat in the Middle East, have called for the reinstatement of a compulsory military draft. The case for coercing young citizens to join the military is supposedly based on social jus­tice?that all should serve?and seems to be but­tressed by reports of shortfalls in voluntary enlistment. In a New York Times op-ed…

  • Backgrounder posted August 3, 1990 by Michael J. McLaughlin High School Dropouts: How Much of a Crisis?

    Introduction In his first State of the Union Address, George Bush this January set six goals to strengthen American education. One of them is to reduce the national high school dropout rate to 10 percent by the end of the decade. Currently, according to Bush, the rate is 25 percent. This high rate, it is said, saddles the United States with an undereducated…

  • Backgrounder posted November 2, 1993 by Dan Greenberg Should Congress Be Above the Law?

    (Archived document, may contain errors) T 965 November 2,1993 SHOULD CONGRESS BE ABOVE THE LAW Congress] can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as on the great mass of society James Madison, Federalist No. 57 It has been said here many times tonight that we want to treat Senators the same as everyone else Mr.…

  • Commentary posted March 21, 2011 by Brian Darling Washington Republicans, Look to Wisconsin

    Washington Republicans, Look to Wisconsin Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s principled stand can teach Washington Republicans an important lesson in bravery.Al Aitken, a good friend of mine who is a Marine veteran and a commercial airline pilot, explained to me a few years ago the difference between courage and bravery.  Courage is taking action and not…

  • Commentary posted June 7, 2012 by James Sherk Scott Walker's Victory Shows Voters Want a Smaller Government

    Last night, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker did what no governor facing a recall election had done before: He won. Walker's victory came just over a year after he curbed the collective bargaining powers of Wisconsin's government unions. Having seen the reforms in action, voters decided they liked them. Walker's reforms prevented unions from hijacking government to serve…

  • Commentary posted June 8, 2012 by James Sherk Whence Walker's Win?

    The roots of Gov. Scott Walker's recall victory in Wisconsin can be traced to Springfield, Ill. The same year that Wisconsinites first elected Walker governor, protesters swarmed the Illinois capitol, yelling: "Raise my taxes! Raise my taxes!" Who protests for higher taxes? Government unions do. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees…

  • Issue Brief posted May 31, 2012 by Jason Richwine, Ph.D. Understanding Public Pension Costs: The Example of Wisconsin

    The generosity of pensions provided to public-sector workers has come under increased scrutiny as states and local governments search for ways to close their budget deficits. The intense and ongoing battle over public-sector collective bargaining in Wisconsin, for example, is in part a conflict over the generosity of public-pension benefits. Whether reducing pension…

  • Commentary posted August 20, 2008 by Brian M. Riedl Social Security and Medicare Reform: Grading the Wisconsin Congressional Delegation's Proposals

    On July 13, the Journal Sentinel opened its pages to Wisconsin's congressional delegation. Each member weighed in on how he or she would solve the long-term Social Security and Medicare funding shortfall. As the only Wisconsinite (born and raised in Appleton) sharing the podium with David Walker on the Fiscal Wake-up Tour, I've taken the liberty of grading each…

Find more work on Wisconsin
  • Issue Brief posted May 31, 2012 by Jason Richwine, Ph.D. Understanding Public Pension Costs: The Example of Wisconsin

    The generosity of pensions provided to public-sector workers has come under increased scrutiny as states and local governments search for ways to close their budget deficits. The intense and ongoing battle over public-sector collective bargaining in Wisconsin, for example, is in part a conflict over the generosity of public-pension benefits. Whether reducing pension…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted November 7, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D. Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11

    A few Members of Congress, motivated by American combat in the Middle East, have called for the reinstatement of a compulsory military draft. The case for coercing young citizens to join the military is supposedly based on social jus­tice?that all should serve?and seems to be but­tressed by reports of shortfalls in voluntary enlistment. In a New York Times op-ed…

  • Backgrounder posted November 2, 1993 by Dan Greenberg Should Congress Be Above the Law?

    (Archived document, may contain errors) T 965 November 2,1993 SHOULD CONGRESS BE ABOVE THE LAW Congress] can make no law which will not have its full operation on themselves and their friends, as well as on the great mass of society James Madison, Federalist No. 57 It has been said here many times tonight that we want to treat Senators the same as everyone else Mr.…

  • Backgrounder posted August 3, 1990 by Michael J. McLaughlin High School Dropouts: How Much of a Crisis?

    Introduction In his first State of the Union Address, George Bush this January set six goals to strengthen American education. One of them is to reduce the national high school dropout rate to 10 percent by the end of the decade. Currently, according to Bush, the rate is 25 percent. This high rate, it is said, saddles the United States with an undereducated…

Find more work on Wisconsin
Find more work on Wisconsin