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Arizona

Our Research & Offerings on Arizona
  • Commentary posted October 15, 2013 by Lindsey Burke The Education Debit Card

    ‘The public-school system has no ability to handle Shawn’s sensory needs,” says Jennifer Doucet, mother of the Arizona fourth-grader. “We needed a program that understood him, that [we] could gear toward his needs, instead of him having to fit into someone else’s box.” So the Doucet family enrolled Shawn in Pieceful Solutions, a private school in Chandler, Ariz., with…

  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Matt A. Mayer, John Malcolm Childish Reaction to Supreme Court Immigration Ruling: Obama Administration Ends a Key Joint Program with Arizona

    Although both Arizona and the United States prevailed in different parts of the Supreme Court’s immigration ruling this week, the Obama Administration’s immediate response seems like a childish slap in the face of the Supreme Court, Arizona, and any other state that might challenge its authority. Justice Antonin Scalia noted in his dissenting opinion, which would…

  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Arizona v. United States: What the States Can Do to Enforce Immigration Laws

    Since the Supreme Court issued its decision on June 25 on Arizona’s immigration law,[1] numerous news reports and commenters have mistakenly said that most of the Arizona law was struck down. That is simply wrong. The error is apparently based on the mistaken assumption that the four provisions reviewed by the Supreme Court were the entire law. But in reality, most…

  • Issue Brief posted April 20, 2012 by Elizabeth Slattery Supreme Court Immigration Showdown: Why States Can Enforce Immigration Laws

    On April 25, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case with significant implications for immigration policy and enforcement well beyond the immediate statute at issue. Arizona v. United States is a challenge to much of the state enforcement scheme of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 (S.B. 1070), which was enacted to detect and address illegal immigration in Arizona.…

  • Backgrounder posted February 28, 2012 by Jessica Zuckerman, Colonel Martin Hershkowitz, Brigadier General Frederic N. Smalkin, James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Why More States Should Establish State Defense Forces

    Abstract: Twenty-two states currently have volunteer state guard units. These units, formally known as state defense forces (SDFs), are today’s state militias. Authorized by the Constitution and built on a strong U.S. militia tradition, today’s SDFs offer a vital, low-cost force multiplier and homeland security resource. In July…

  • WebMemo posted October 4, 2011 by Lindsey Burke Education Savings Accounts: A Promising Way Forward on School Choice

    Across the country, states are enacting and expanding school choice options for families. This year alone, 12 states and the District of Columbia have implemented new school choice options for children or expanded existing options, leading The Wall Street Journal to label 2011 “The Year of School Choice.”[1]   Among the many school choice advances in 2011 was the…

  • Lecture posted December 3, 2010 by Kris W. Kobach, D.Phil., J.D. The Arizona Immigration Law: What It Actually Does, and Why It Is Constitutional

    Abstract: America has arrived at a dangerous, unprece­dented moment: an Administration is attacking a state that is simply trying to help the federal government restore the rule of law. In addition to partisan mischarac­terizations of S.B. 1070, observes Professor Kris Kobach, the Eric Holder Justice Department launched an unprece­dented and unwarranted…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 1, 2010 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Arizona Immigration Law: Racial Discrimination Prohibited

    Abstract: Why has the Obama Administration, as part of its lawsuit against the Arizona statute that attempts to help enforce national immigration laws, not claimed that the state law requires or allows illegal racial profiling? The answer is surprisingly simple: Arizona state law actually contains more stringent restrictions against racial profiling than federal…

  • Backgrounder posted September 1, 2010 by James Sherk The New Face of the Union Movement: Government Employees

    Abstract: Unions have been a familiar part of American working life for more than 70 years. Less familiar is the state of the union movement today: More union members now work for the government than for private employers. The above-market salaries and benefits that government employees receive are paid for by taxpayers. So, the union movement that began as a campaign to…

  • WebMemo posted May 20, 2010 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. White House Must Stop Playing Politics with Immigration and Arizona Law

    In recent days the President and senior White House officials have—in the presence of foreign dignitaries—castigated a law passed in the state of Arizona. This new Arizona law directs that when law enforcement officers engage in a lawful stop, detention, or arrest, a reasonable attempt shall be made, when practicable, to ask about a person’s legal status if reasonable…

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  • Issue Brief posted April 20, 2012 by Elizabeth Slattery Supreme Court Immigration Showdown: Why States Can Enforce Immigration Laws

    On April 25, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case with significant implications for immigration policy and enforcement well beyond the immediate statute at issue. Arizona v. United States is a challenge to much of the state enforcement scheme of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 (S.B. 1070), which was enacted to detect and address illegal immigration in Arizona.…

  • Backgrounder posted February 28, 2012 by Jessica Zuckerman, Colonel Martin Hershkowitz, Brigadier General Frederic N. Smalkin, James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Why More States Should Establish State Defense Forces

    Abstract: Twenty-two states currently have volunteer state guard units. These units, formally known as state defense forces (SDFs), are today’s state militias. Authorized by the Constitution and built on a strong U.S. militia tradition, today’s SDFs offer a vital, low-cost force multiplier and homeland security resource. In July…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted November 7, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D. Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11

    A few Members of Congress, motivated by American combat in the Middle East, have called for the reinstatement of a compulsory military draft. The case for coercing young citizens to join the military is supposedly based on social jus­tice?that all should serve?and seems to be but­tressed by reports of shortfalls in voluntary enlistment. In a New York Times op-ed…

  • Lecture posted December 3, 2010 by Kris W. Kobach, D.Phil., J.D. The Arizona Immigration Law: What It Actually Does, and Why It Is Constitutional

    Abstract: America has arrived at a dangerous, unprece­dented moment: an Administration is attacking a state that is simply trying to help the federal government restore the rule of law. In addition to partisan mischarac­terizations of S.B. 1070, observes Professor Kris Kobach, the Eric Holder Justice Department launched an unprece­dented and unwarranted…

  • WebMemo posted October 4, 2011 by Lindsey Burke Education Savings Accounts: A Promising Way Forward on School Choice

    Across the country, states are enacting and expanding school choice options for families. This year alone, 12 states and the District of Columbia have implemented new school choice options for children or expanded existing options, leading The Wall Street Journal to label 2011 “The Year of School Choice.”[1]   Among the many school choice advances in 2011 was the…

  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Arizona v. United States: What the States Can Do to Enforce Immigration Laws

    Since the Supreme Court issued its decision on June 25 on Arizona’s immigration law,[1] numerous news reports and commenters have mistakenly said that most of the Arizona law was struck down. That is simply wrong. The error is apparently based on the mistaken assumption that the four provisions reviewed by the Supreme Court were the entire law. But in reality, most…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 1, 2010 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Arizona Immigration Law: Racial Discrimination Prohibited

    Abstract: Why has the Obama Administration, as part of its lawsuit against the Arizona statute that attempts to help enforce national immigration laws, not claimed that the state law requires or allows illegal racial profiling? The answer is surprisingly simple: Arizona state law actually contains more stringent restrictions against racial profiling than federal…

  • Commentary posted October 15, 2013 by Lindsey Burke The Education Debit Card

    ‘The public-school system has no ability to handle Shawn’s sensory needs,” says Jennifer Doucet, mother of the Arizona fourth-grader. “We needed a program that understood him, that [we] could gear toward his needs, instead of him having to fit into someone else’s box.” So the Doucet family enrolled Shawn in Pieceful Solutions, a private school in Chandler, Ariz., with…

  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Matt A. Mayer, John Malcolm Childish Reaction to Supreme Court Immigration Ruling: Obama Administration Ends a Key Joint Program with Arizona

    Although both Arizona and the United States prevailed in different parts of the Supreme Court’s immigration ruling this week, the Obama Administration’s immediate response seems like a childish slap in the face of the Supreme Court, Arizona, and any other state that might challenge its authority. Justice Antonin Scalia noted in his dissenting opinion, which would…

  • WebMemo posted May 20, 2010 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. White House Must Stop Playing Politics with Immigration and Arizona Law

    In recent days the President and senior White House officials have—in the presence of foreign dignitaries—castigated a law passed in the state of Arizona. This new Arizona law directs that when law enforcement officers engage in a lawful stop, detention, or arrest, a reasonable attempt shall be made, when practicable, to ask about a person’s legal status if reasonable…

Find more work on Arizona
  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Matt A. Mayer, John Malcolm Childish Reaction to Supreme Court Immigration Ruling: Obama Administration Ends a Key Joint Program with Arizona

    Although both Arizona and the United States prevailed in different parts of the Supreme Court’s immigration ruling this week, the Obama Administration’s immediate response seems like a childish slap in the face of the Supreme Court, Arizona, and any other state that might challenge its authority. Justice Antonin Scalia noted in his dissenting opinion, which would…

  • Issue Brief posted June 27, 2012 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Arizona v. United States: What the States Can Do to Enforce Immigration Laws

    Since the Supreme Court issued its decision on June 25 on Arizona’s immigration law,[1] numerous news reports and commenters have mistakenly said that most of the Arizona law was struck down. That is simply wrong. The error is apparently based on the mistaken assumption that the four provisions reviewed by the Supreme Court were the entire law. But in reality, most…

  • Issue Brief posted April 20, 2012 by Elizabeth Slattery Supreme Court Immigration Showdown: Why States Can Enforce Immigration Laws

    On April 25, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a case with significant implications for immigration policy and enforcement well beyond the immediate statute at issue. Arizona v. United States is a challenge to much of the state enforcement scheme of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 (S.B. 1070), which was enacted to detect and address illegal immigration in Arizona.…

  • Backgrounder posted February 28, 2012 by Jessica Zuckerman, Colonel Martin Hershkowitz, Brigadier General Frederic N. Smalkin, James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Why More States Should Establish State Defense Forces

    Abstract: Twenty-two states currently have volunteer state guard units. These units, formally known as state defense forces (SDFs), are today’s state militias. Authorized by the Constitution and built on a strong U.S. militia tradition, today’s SDFs offer a vital, low-cost force multiplier and homeland security resource. In July…

  • WebMemo posted October 4, 2011 by Lindsey Burke Education Savings Accounts: A Promising Way Forward on School Choice

    Across the country, states are enacting and expanding school choice options for families. This year alone, 12 states and the District of Columbia have implemented new school choice options for children or expanded existing options, leading The Wall Street Journal to label 2011 “The Year of School Choice.”[1]   Among the many school choice advances in 2011 was the…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 1, 2010 by Hans A. von Spakovsky The Arizona Immigration Law: Racial Discrimination Prohibited

    Abstract: Why has the Obama Administration, as part of its lawsuit against the Arizona statute that attempts to help enforce national immigration laws, not claimed that the state law requires or allows illegal racial profiling? The answer is surprisingly simple: Arizona state law actually contains more stringent restrictions against racial profiling than federal…

  • Backgrounder posted September 1, 2010 by James Sherk The New Face of the Union Movement: Government Employees

    Abstract: Unions have been a familiar part of American working life for more than 70 years. Less familiar is the state of the union movement today: More union members now work for the government than for private employers. The above-market salaries and benefits that government employees receive are paid for by taxpayers. So, the union movement that began as a campaign to…

  • WebMemo posted May 20, 2010 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. White House Must Stop Playing Politics with Immigration and Arizona Law

    In recent days the President and senior White House officials have—in the presence of foreign dignitaries—castigated a law passed in the state of Arizona. This new Arizona law directs that when law enforcement officers engage in a lawful stop, detention, or arrest, a reasonable attempt shall be made, when practicable, to ask about a person’s legal status if reasonable…

  • Backgrounder posted May 14, 2008 by Dan Lips, Evan Feinberg Improving Education in the Nation's Capital: Expanding School Choice

    The District of Columbia is home to one of the nation's most troubled public school systems. The District spends $14,400 for every child in public school—well above the national average and more than any of the 50 states.[1] The 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reported that Washington, D.C.'s fourth and eighth graders scored lower than any other…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted November 7, 2005 by Tim Kane, Ph.D. Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11

    A few Members of Congress, motivated by American combat in the Middle East, have called for the reinstatement of a compulsory military draft. The case for coercing young citizens to join the military is supposedly based on social jus­tice?that all should serve?and seems to be but­tressed by reports of shortfalls in voluntary enlistment. In a New York Times op-ed…

Find more work on Arizona
Find more work on Arizona