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Colombia

Our Research & Offerings on Colombia
  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2014 by James M. Roberts The Pacific Alliance: A Latin American Role Model for the United States

    This Issue Brief is also available in Spanish at Libertad.org. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the old 20th-century debate about whether to engage with the global capitalist system is long over, replaced by a virtual consensus about the importance of trade and international investment. A new cleavage has emerged, however, over how to engage the rising economies of…

  • WebMemo posted October 6, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Colombia Free Trade Agreement: Will the U.S. Miss a Historic Opportunity?

    Now that the Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) has moved from the executive to the legislative branch for debate and pending passage, Members of Congress should reflect on the historic significance of their vote and its implications for advancing U.S. national interests and preserving long-term international leadership. Passage of the FTA represents a historic…

  • WebMemo posted July 11, 2011 by Bryan Riley Win–Win Trade Agreements Would Boost the U.S. Economy

    Debates about trade and tariffs are a recurring element in U.S. history, and each time they have been resolved in favor of more freedom, Americans have enjoyed long periods of greater prosperity. Legislators should keep this history in mind and advance pending trade agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea without delay or extraneous conditions.   Our…

  • WebMemo posted June 21, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., Bruce Klingner Enhance U.S. Security: Pass Free Trade Agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea

    From the Korean War to Operation Just Cause in Panama to Plan Colombia, the U.S. has expended lives and treasure to protect Colombia, Panama, and South Korea from Communist aggression, narco-violence, insurgency, and misrule. The investment has paid off. Today, all three are increasingly prosperous democracies and geopolitical allies with 100 million citizens and a…

  • WebMemo posted February 10, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Santos at Six Months: Earning Respect and a Free Trade Agreement

    Inaugurated August 7, 2010, Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos is striking a prudent balance between preserving the security policies of predecessor Alvaro Uribe and forging a new path for economic and social development in Latin America’s third-largest nation. Santos’s productive first six months signal that Colombia is an advancing and able partner in a problematic…

  • WebMemo posted August 13, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Santos–Chávez Santa Marta Summit: A Moment of Promise and Peril in the Americas

    The August 10 summit between newly inaugurated Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez is a potentially positive step in the Americas. The summit lowered tensions that were recently heightened when officials of the outgoing Uribe government presented evidence showing that an estimated 1,5000 fighters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia…

  • Backgrounder posted August 10, 2010 by Bryan Riley A Prescription for Export Growth—and Economic Recovery

    Abstract: President Obama has pledged to double U.S. exports over the next five years—an ambitious goal. But the President’s strategy of creating Export Promotion Cabinets and subsidizing loans is not the way to make that happen. The federal budget deficit—$1.4 trillion—is the largest obstacle to increasing exports, every year diverting hundreds of billions of dollars in…

  • WebMemo on August 4, 2010 Santos Takes Charge in Colombia: New Leader for an Old Friend

    On August 7, 2010, there will be a historic change of presidential leadership in Colombia. Executive power will pass from Alvaro Uribe—the strong, dynamic president who led the country for eight transformative years and is revered by many Colombians as the savior of a nation—to a very experienced, equally popular, yet different leader, Juan Manuel Santos. In June,…

  • Backgrounder posted July 23, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Colombia and Obama’s Latin America Policy: Time to Close Ranks and Support a Friend

    Abstract: On August 7, 2010, Juan Manual Santos will take office as the new president of Colombia. His election is a testimony to the Colombian public’s commitment to democracy and a strong U.S.–Colombian relationship. Over the past decade, the two countries have achieved an unprecedented level of cooperation on many fronts—from fighting drug-trafficking and…

  • WebMemo posted June 4, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Action Needed on Chávez, Democracy, and Trade: Secretary of State Clinton Visits Latin America Again

    Next week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will travel to Lima, Peru, to attend the Organization of American States (OAS) general assembly. She is also planning a brief visit to Ecuador, Colombia, and Barbados in what will be her second swing through the region in 2010. Clinton cannot afford to squander this opportunity to focus attention on Venezuela’s increasingly…

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  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2014 by James M. Roberts The Pacific Alliance: A Latin American Role Model for the United States

    This Issue Brief is also available in Spanish at Libertad.org. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the old 20th-century debate about whether to engage with the global capitalist system is long over, replaced by a virtual consensus about the importance of trade and international investment. A new cleavage has emerged, however, over how to engage the rising economies of…

  • Backgrounder posted July 23, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Colombia and Obama’s Latin America Policy: Time to Close Ranks and Support a Friend

    Abstract: On August 7, 2010, Juan Manual Santos will take office as the new president of Colombia. His election is a testimony to the Colombian public’s commitment to democracy and a strong U.S.–Colombian relationship. Over the past decade, the two countries have achieved an unprecedented level of cooperation on many fronts—from fighting drug-trafficking and…

  • WebMemo posted August 18, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Strengthening U.S. Anti-Narcotics Efforts in Colombia

    To preserve and strengthen U.S. counter-drug capacity, the Obama Administration is negotiating for the right to use air and naval facilities in Colombia. If these negotiations are successful, the U.S. forward operating location (FOL) in the battle against cocaine-traffickers and guerrillas in the Andean-Pacific region would transfer from Manta in Ecuador to Colombia.…

  • WebMemo posted February 12, 2010 by Daniella Markheim National Export Initiative Falls Short as a Winning U.S. Trade Policy

    On February 4, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke fleshed out the details of President Obama’s National Export Initiative (NEI), a plan unveiled in the 2010 State of the Union address that promises to double U.S. exports over the next five years and support 2 million American jobs.[1] The NEI aims to bolster U.S. international competitiveness by creating (1) an export…

  • WebMemo posted March 4, 2010 by Daniella Markheim An Agenda That Fails to Promote Trade

    In the opening chapter of the 2010 Trade Policy Agenda and 2009 Annual Report, President Obama unveiled a trade agenda that aims to double U.S. exports within five years and create jobs.[1] Prominent on Obama’s trade to-do list is the implementation of the National Export Initiative (NEI), which will be directed by a new export promotion cabinet. This cabinet will…

  • WebMemo posted December 11, 2009 by Daniella Markheim Congress Should Renew Expiring Trade Preferences

    Unless Congress acts now, two important trade programs -- the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) and the Andean Trade Preference Act (ATPA) -- will expire at the end of 2009. Because these trade programs make essential contributions to the economies of the countries that they favor while benefiting American businesses and consumers, the renewal process should be…

  • News Releases on November 19, 2009 Three Heritage Foundation Scholars to Serve as International Observers for Honduras Election

    Washington, November 19, 2009- Three Heritage Foundation scholars have been tabbed to serve as international observers for the Nov. 29 presidential election in Honduras. All three speak fluent Spanish. The three Heritage representatives are: Ray Walser, Heritage's senior policy analyst for Latin America. Walser previously served 27 years in the U.S. Department of…

  • Testimony posted December 7, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S. Drug Policy in Latin America

    Testimony before the Committee on the Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, of the United States House of Representatives December 07, 2009 My name is Ray Walser. I am a Senior Policy Analyst at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should not be construed as representing any official position of…

  • WebMemo posted February 10, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Santos at Six Months: Earning Respect and a Free Trade Agreement

    Inaugurated August 7, 2010, Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos is striking a prudent balance between preserving the security policies of predecessor Alvaro Uribe and forging a new path for economic and social development in Latin America’s third-largest nation. Santos’s productive first six months signal that Colombia is an advancing and able partner in a problematic…

  • WebMemo posted July 27, 2009 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Honduras's Conservative Awakening

    Since June 28--when the Honduran military placed Manuel Zelaya on an aircraft bound for San Jose, Costa Rica--massive media coverage, diplomatic maneuvering, and political theater have accompanied efforts to restore Zelaya to the presidency of his Central American nation. In the aftermath of his exile, Manuel Zelaya's shift from the political center toward both…

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  • Issue Brief posted May 16, 2014 by James M. Roberts The Pacific Alliance: A Latin American Role Model for the United States

    This Issue Brief is also available in Spanish at Libertad.org. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the old 20th-century debate about whether to engage with the global capitalist system is long over, replaced by a virtual consensus about the importance of trade and international investment. A new cleavage has emerged, however, over how to engage the rising economies of…

  • WebMemo posted October 6, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Colombia Free Trade Agreement: Will the U.S. Miss a Historic Opportunity?

    Now that the Colombia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) has moved from the executive to the legislative branch for debate and pending passage, Members of Congress should reflect on the historic significance of their vote and its implications for advancing U.S. national interests and preserving long-term international leadership. Passage of the FTA represents a historic…

  • WebMemo posted July 11, 2011 by Bryan Riley Win–Win Trade Agreements Would Boost the U.S. Economy

    Debates about trade and tariffs are a recurring element in U.S. history, and each time they have been resolved in favor of more freedom, Americans have enjoyed long periods of greater prosperity. Legislators should keep this history in mind and advance pending trade agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea without delay or extraneous conditions.   Our…

  • WebMemo posted June 21, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D., Bruce Klingner Enhance U.S. Security: Pass Free Trade Agreements with Colombia, Panama, and South Korea

    From the Korean War to Operation Just Cause in Panama to Plan Colombia, the U.S. has expended lives and treasure to protect Colombia, Panama, and South Korea from Communist aggression, narco-violence, insurgency, and misrule. The investment has paid off. Today, all three are increasingly prosperous democracies and geopolitical allies with 100 million citizens and a…

  • WebMemo posted February 10, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Santos at Six Months: Earning Respect and a Free Trade Agreement

    Inaugurated August 7, 2010, Colombia’s President Juan Manuel Santos is striking a prudent balance between preserving the security policies of predecessor Alvaro Uribe and forging a new path for economic and social development in Latin America’s third-largest nation. Santos’s productive first six months signal that Colombia is an advancing and able partner in a problematic…

  • WebMemo posted August 13, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Santos–Chávez Santa Marta Summit: A Moment of Promise and Peril in the Americas

    The August 10 summit between newly inaugurated Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez is a potentially positive step in the Americas. The summit lowered tensions that were recently heightened when officials of the outgoing Uribe government presented evidence showing that an estimated 1,5000 fighters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia…

  • Backgrounder posted August 10, 2010 by Bryan Riley A Prescription for Export Growth—and Economic Recovery

    Abstract: President Obama has pledged to double U.S. exports over the next five years—an ambitious goal. But the President’s strategy of creating Export Promotion Cabinets and subsidizing loans is not the way to make that happen. The federal budget deficit—$1.4 trillion—is the largest obstacle to increasing exports, every year diverting hundreds of billions of dollars in…

  • WebMemo on August 4, 2010 Santos Takes Charge in Colombia: New Leader for an Old Friend

    On August 7, 2010, there will be a historic change of presidential leadership in Colombia. Executive power will pass from Alvaro Uribe—the strong, dynamic president who led the country for eight transformative years and is revered by many Colombians as the savior of a nation—to a very experienced, equally popular, yet different leader, Juan Manuel Santos. In June,…

  • Backgrounder posted July 23, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Colombia and Obama’s Latin America Policy: Time to Close Ranks and Support a Friend

    Abstract: On August 7, 2010, Juan Manual Santos will take office as the new president of Colombia. His election is a testimony to the Colombian public’s commitment to democracy and a strong U.S.–Colombian relationship. Over the past decade, the two countries have achieved an unprecedented level of cooperation on many fronts—from fighting drug-trafficking and…

  • WebMemo posted June 4, 2010 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. Action Needed on Chávez, Democracy, and Trade: Secretary of State Clinton Visits Latin America Again

    Next week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will travel to Lima, Peru, to attend the Organization of American States (OAS) general assembly. She is also planning a brief visit to Ecuador, Colombia, and Barbados in what will be her second swing through the region in 2010. Clinton cannot afford to squander this opportunity to focus attention on Venezuela’s increasingly…

Find more work on Colombia
Find more work on Colombia