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Brazil

Our Research & Offerings on Brazil
  • Special Report posted October 17, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ryan Olson Time for Brazil to Reject Capital Controls and End Failing Statist Policies

    In 2010, Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega fired off the first of a series of rhetorical salvos in what he called the “currency wars.” According to Mantega, serial competitive devaluations by the world’s largest economies aimed at boosting First World exports and monetizing their budget deficits were undermining the health of emerging economies—particularly his…

  • Commentary posted August 2, 2013 by James M. Roberts Brazil’s Economic Woes Show Limits of State Meddling

    Brazilians are angry. President Dilma Rousseff's government is spending billions on beautiful new stadiums — and it’s all about image. And when billions of viewers tune in to the 2014 soccer World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, Ms. Rousseff wants them to see what appears to be a First World country. But that’s not what Brazil’s middle class sees when they look out…

  • Issue Brief posted January 7, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the Caribbean: A Wish List for 2013

    Too often Latin America and the Caribbean fall off political radar screens in Washington. Nonetheless, geography, robust trade and investment ties, strong demographic links, and shared democratic and economic values connect Americans deeply with the region. In 2013 and beyond, the second Obama Administration and Washington policymakers of all stripes should work to…

  • Special Report posted September 20, 2012 by James M. Roberts, Mark Schreiber, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Brazil: Restoring Economic Growth Through Economic Freedom

    Abstract: Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country, Latin America’s largest economy, and an important trading partner for the U.S. The Brazilian government dominates many areas of the country’s economy, undercutting development of a more vibrant private sector, and Brazil’s four-year growth average of 4 percent has recently weakened. Government expenditures consume…

  • Issue Brief posted April 6, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit: Time for a Bold Policy Vision

    An optimistic view of the April 9 meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama and Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is that it will produce a stronger relationship with an emerging global power here in the Americas. Despite significant differences on key democracy, human rights, and foreign policy issues, the U.S. must elevate its game with Brazil.[1]  If it is a…

  • Issue Brief posted April 3, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit Must Address Differences on Democracy, Human Rights, and Iran

    On April 9, President Obama welcomes Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s first female president, to the White House for an official visit. The White House hopes to showcase a strong, reliable partnership with Brazil. It will focus attention on a broad range of low-cost soft power initiatives aimed at education, technology, energy, research, and economic cooperation, while leaving on…

  • WebMemo posted March 18, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama in Latin America: Put Hugo Chavez on the Agenda

    President Obama undertakes his March 19–23 trip to Latin America at a time when the international scene is in enormous flux. In three stops—Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador—the President will send an upbeat message of equal partnership and offer broader U.S. engagement in Latin America. President Obama will meet with three leaders whose views count when it comes to…

  • WebMemo posted March 17, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama’s Visit to Latin America: Democracy, Trade, and Security First

    Between March 19 and 23, President Obama will embark on a rapid visit to Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador. This is his first visit to South or Central America as President. Despite considerable fanfare, the trip comes at an awkward time, when global attention is riveted on the tragedy in Japan and continued unrest in the Middle East, particularly Libya’s brutal civil war.…

  • Play Movie Ray Walser on CNN 12/16/08 Video Recorded on December 17, 2008 Ray Walser on CNN 12/16/08

    Ray Walser comments on President Bush not being invited to a meeting of Latin American Leaders that is being held in Brazil…

  • WebMemo posted August 15, 2008 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Polish-U.S. Missile Defense Deal Makes Sense

    It is widely reported in the world press that the United States and Poland have agreed on terms for deploying ballistic missile interceptors in the East European country. The interceptors would work in conjunction with radars that will be deployed in the Czech Republic (the result of another agreement announced earlier this year). Together, they will comprise a…

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  • Special Report posted September 20, 2012 by James M. Roberts, Mark Schreiber, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Brazil: Restoring Economic Growth Through Economic Freedom

    Abstract: Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country, Latin America’s largest economy, and an important trading partner for the U.S. The Brazilian government dominates many areas of the country’s economy, undercutting development of a more vibrant private sector, and Brazil’s four-year growth average of 4 percent has recently weakened. Government expenditures consume…

  • Special Report posted October 17, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ryan Olson Time for Brazil to Reject Capital Controls and End Failing Statist Policies

    In 2010, Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega fired off the first of a series of rhetorical salvos in what he called the “currency wars.” According to Mantega, serial competitive devaluations by the world’s largest economies aimed at boosting First World exports and monetizing their budget deficits were undermining the health of emerging economies—particularly his…

  • Commentary posted August 2, 2013 by James M. Roberts Brazil’s Economic Woes Show Limits of State Meddling

    Brazilians are angry. President Dilma Rousseff's government is spending billions on beautiful new stadiums — and it’s all about image. And when billions of viewers tune in to the 2014 soccer World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, Ms. Rousseff wants them to see what appears to be a First World country. But that’s not what Brazil’s middle class sees when they look out…

  • WebMemo posted August 15, 2008 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Polish-U.S. Missile Defense Deal Makes Sense

    It is widely reported in the world press that the United States and Poland have agreed on terms for deploying ballistic missile interceptors in the East European country. The interceptors would work in conjunction with radars that will be deployed in the Czech Republic (the result of another agreement announced earlier this year). Together, they will comprise a…

  • Issue Brief posted April 6, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit: Time for a Bold Policy Vision

    An optimistic view of the April 9 meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama and Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is that it will produce a stronger relationship with an emerging global power here in the Americas. Despite significant differences on key democracy, human rights, and foreign policy issues, the U.S. must elevate its game with Brazil.[1]  If it is a…

  • Issue Brief posted April 3, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit Must Address Differences on Democracy, Human Rights, and Iran

    On April 9, President Obama welcomes Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s first female president, to the White House for an official visit. The White House hopes to showcase a strong, reliable partnership with Brazil. It will focus attention on a broad range of low-cost soft power initiatives aimed at education, technology, energy, research, and economic cooperation, while leaving on…

  • Issue Brief posted January 7, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the Caribbean: A Wish List for 2013

    Too often Latin America and the Caribbean fall off political radar screens in Washington. Nonetheless, geography, robust trade and investment ties, strong demographic links, and shared democratic and economic values connect Americans deeply with the region. In 2013 and beyond, the second Obama Administration and Washington policymakers of all stripes should work to…

  • WebMemo posted March 18, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama in Latin America: Put Hugo Chavez on the Agenda

    President Obama undertakes his March 19–23 trip to Latin America at a time when the international scene is in enormous flux. In three stops—Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador—the President will send an upbeat message of equal partnership and offer broader U.S. engagement in Latin America. President Obama will meet with three leaders whose views count when it comes to…

  • WebMemo posted March 17, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama’s Visit to Latin America: Democracy, Trade, and Security First

    Between March 19 and 23, President Obama will embark on a rapid visit to Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador. This is his first visit to South or Central America as President. Despite considerable fanfare, the trip comes at an awkward time, when global attention is riveted on the tragedy in Japan and continued unrest in the Middle East, particularly Libya’s brutal civil war.…

  • Backgrounder posted May 13, 2008 by James M. Roberts, Israel Ortega How Reforms in Mexico Could Make the U.S. More Secure

    Felipe Calderón, who began his single sexenio (six-year term) as President of Mexico in December 2006, has made significant progress in the fight against narcotrafficking, but Mexicans are still waiting to see whether his government will successfully chal­lenge the private- and public-sector monopolies and duopolies that dominate huge portions of mexico economy. These…

Find more work on Brazil
  • Special Report posted October 17, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ryan Olson Time for Brazil to Reject Capital Controls and End Failing Statist Policies

    In 2010, Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega fired off the first of a series of rhetorical salvos in what he called the “currency wars.” According to Mantega, serial competitive devaluations by the world’s largest economies aimed at boosting First World exports and monetizing their budget deficits were undermining the health of emerging economies—particularly his…

  • Issue Brief posted January 7, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. Latin America and the Caribbean: A Wish List for 2013

    Too often Latin America and the Caribbean fall off political radar screens in Washington. Nonetheless, geography, robust trade and investment ties, strong demographic links, and shared democratic and economic values connect Americans deeply with the region. In 2013 and beyond, the second Obama Administration and Washington policymakers of all stripes should work to…

  • Special Report posted September 20, 2012 by James M. Roberts, Mark Schreiber, Derek Scissors, Ph.D. Brazil: Restoring Economic Growth Through Economic Freedom

    Abstract: Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country, Latin America’s largest economy, and an important trading partner for the U.S. The Brazilian government dominates many areas of the country’s economy, undercutting development of a more vibrant private sector, and Brazil’s four-year growth average of 4 percent has recently weakened. Government expenditures consume…

  • Issue Brief posted April 6, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit: Time for a Bold Policy Vision

    An optimistic view of the April 9 meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama and Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is that it will produce a stronger relationship with an emerging global power here in the Americas. Despite significant differences on key democracy, human rights, and foreign policy issues, the U.S. must elevate its game with Brazil.[1]  If it is a…

  • Issue Brief posted April 3, 2012 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. U.S.–Brazil Summit Must Address Differences on Democracy, Human Rights, and Iran

    On April 9, President Obama welcomes Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s first female president, to the White House for an official visit. The White House hopes to showcase a strong, reliable partnership with Brazil. It will focus attention on a broad range of low-cost soft power initiatives aimed at education, technology, energy, research, and economic cooperation, while leaving on…

  • WebMemo posted March 18, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama in Latin America: Put Hugo Chavez on the Agenda

    President Obama undertakes his March 19–23 trip to Latin America at a time when the international scene is in enormous flux. In three stops—Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador—the President will send an upbeat message of equal partnership and offer broader U.S. engagement in Latin America. President Obama will meet with three leaders whose views count when it comes to…

  • WebMemo posted March 17, 2011 by Ray Walser, Ph.D. President Obama’s Visit to Latin America: Democracy, Trade, and Security First

    Between March 19 and 23, President Obama will embark on a rapid visit to Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador. This is his first visit to South or Central America as President. Despite considerable fanfare, the trip comes at an awkward time, when global attention is riveted on the tragedy in Japan and continued unrest in the Middle East, particularly Libya’s brutal civil war.…

  • WebMemo posted August 15, 2008 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Polish-U.S. Missile Defense Deal Makes Sense

    It is widely reported in the world press that the United States and Poland have agreed on terms for deploying ballistic missile interceptors in the East European country. The interceptors would work in conjunction with radars that will be deployed in the Czech Republic (the result of another agreement announced earlier this year). Together, they will comprise a…

  • Backgrounder posted May 13, 2008 by James M. Roberts, Israel Ortega How Reforms in Mexico Could Make the U.S. More Secure

    Felipe Calderón, who began his single sexenio (six-year term) as President of Mexico in December 2006, has made significant progress in the fight against narcotrafficking, but Mexicans are still waiting to see whether his government will successfully chal­lenge the private- and public-sector monopolies and duopolies that dominate huge portions of mexico economy. These…

Find more work on Brazil
Find more work on Brazil