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Argentina

Our Research & Offerings on Argentina
  • Commentary posted August 6, 2014 by Stephen Moore Don't Cry for Argentina—Cry for Us

    Thursday’s headline in the Los Angeles Times — “Argentina Defaults on International Debt” — spooked me, as it did investors. The stock market tanked on the news. All Americans should feel the same apprehension. Argentina has about $200 billion in debt including billions in restructured bonds that it still can’t make payments on. Now Argentina has to go hat in hand to…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands Audio Recorded on March 1, 2013 Heritage in Focus: Bullying the Falklands

    Fellows Luke Coffey and Ted Bromund discuss the century-long feud between Argentina and the United Kingdom over sovereignty of the Falkland Islands on this week's Heritage in Focus. Jackie Anderson hosts. To get regular updates on Heritage in Focus podcasts, visit our RSS feed or subscribe on iTunes.…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: U.S. Should Support Right to Self-Determination

    On March 10–11, the Falkland Islands, a British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, will hold a referendum to decide whether to maintain allegiance to Great Britain. The islands are self-governing but maintain the British monarch as their head of state. The referendum is an answer to Argentina, which, though defeated by Britain in the 1982 Falklands War, is again…

  • Issue Brief posted November 26, 2012 by Luke Coffey Argentina No Longer Deserves to Be a Major Non-NATO Ally of the U.S.

    In 1998, President Bill Clinton designated Argentina as a Major Non-NATO Ally (MNNA) of the United States—a highly sought-after status that includes exclusive military-to-military cooperation. Today, only 15 countries in the world enjoy MNNA status. However, Argentina under the leadership of Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is not the dependable and friendly Argentina…

  • Commentary posted July 24, 2012 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Cristina Kirchner Won’t Be Missed at the Olympics Following Her Foolish Falklands Stunt

    Argentina’s president Cristina Kirchner will not be attending the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games, according to a report in The Independent. The newspaper describes this as a “snub” to the UK by Buenos Aires: Argentina has decided not to send its president to attend the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in a diplomatic snub to Britain at a time of growing…

  • Issue Brief posted June 14, 2012 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Falklands War: Lessons of Liberation Ring True for U.S. Today

    Thirty years ago today, the Falkland Islands War between Great Britain and Argentina ended with a cease-fire after a hard-fought British campaign to liberate the islands from their Argentine occupiers. That victory would not have been possible if Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had not launched the daring campaign and if the United States, under President Ronald Reagan,…

  • WebMemo posted February 8, 2012 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Ray Walser, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: United States Should Back Great Britain

    In a blatant show of disdain for the Anglo–American Special Relationship, the Obama Administration has weighed in on the mounting tensions between Great Britain and Argentina over the Falkland Islands. Just two days after Prime Minister David Cameron issued a robust statement in the House of Commons in mid-January vowing to defend the sovereignty of the Falklands, the…

  • WebMemo posted June 9, 2011 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. President Obama Should Side with Britain over the Falkland Islands

    President Obama was effusive in his praise for the Special Relationship when he visited London in May, but his Administration continues to slap Britain in the face over the highly sensitive Falkland Islands sovereignty issue by aligning itself with Argentina’s call for U.N.-brokered talks on the future of the islands. This reckless approach toward the U.S.–U.K.…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2011 by James M. Roberts Holding the Kirchners Accountable for Argentina’s Economic Freefall

    Abstract: In Argentina, the rule of law and free-market principles have been weakened dramatically over the past decade. Under the leadership of Nestor and Cristina Kirchner, economic freedom in Argentina has been in a virtual freefall, corruption has been rampant, and the government’s ties to strongmen in the region, such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez, are…

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  • Commentary posted August 6, 2014 by Stephen Moore Don't Cry for Argentina—Cry for Us

    Thursday’s headline in the Los Angeles Times — “Argentina Defaults on International Debt” — spooked me, as it did investors. The stock market tanked on the news. All Americans should feel the same apprehension. Argentina has about $200 billion in debt including billions in restructured bonds that it still can’t make payments on. Now Argentina has to go hat in hand to…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: U.S. Should Support Right to Self-Determination

    On March 10–11, the Falkland Islands, a British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, will hold a referendum to decide whether to maintain allegiance to Great Britain. The islands are self-governing but maintain the British monarch as their head of state. The referendum is an answer to Argentina, which, though defeated by Britain in the 1982 Falklands War, is again…

  • Issue Brief posted November 26, 2012 by Luke Coffey Argentina No Longer Deserves to Be a Major Non-NATO Ally of the U.S.

    In 1998, President Bill Clinton designated Argentina as a Major Non-NATO Ally (MNNA) of the United States—a highly sought-after status that includes exclusive military-to-military cooperation. Today, only 15 countries in the world enjoy MNNA status. However, Argentina under the leadership of Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is not the dependable and friendly Argentina…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2011 by James M. Roberts Holding the Kirchners Accountable for Argentina’s Economic Freefall

    Abstract: In Argentina, the rule of law and free-market principles have been weakened dramatically over the past decade. Under the leadership of Nestor and Cristina Kirchner, economic freedom in Argentina has been in a virtual freefall, corruption has been rampant, and the government’s ties to strongmen in the region, such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez, are…

  • WebMemo posted February 8, 2012 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Ray Walser, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: United States Should Back Great Britain

    In a blatant show of disdain for the Anglo–American Special Relationship, the Obama Administration has weighed in on the mounting tensions between Great Britain and Argentina over the Falkland Islands. Just two days after Prime Minister David Cameron issued a robust statement in the House of Commons in mid-January vowing to defend the sovereignty of the Falklands, the…

  • WebMemo posted April 22, 2010 by James M. Roberts Cronyism and Corruption Are Killing Economic Freedom in Argentina

    Argentina’s ranking in The Wall Street Journal/Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom—now 135th out of the 179 countries ranked in the Index—has declined steadily in the seven years since President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and her husband, former President Nestor Kirchner, took power. It is by far the lowest ranked G-20 nation. Recently Charles…

  • Issue Brief posted June 14, 2012 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Falklands War: Lessons of Liberation Ring True for U.S. Today

    Thirty years ago today, the Falkland Islands War between Great Britain and Argentina ended with a cease-fire after a hard-fought British campaign to liberate the islands from their Argentine occupiers. That victory would not have been possible if Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had not launched the daring campaign and if the United States, under President Ronald Reagan,…

  • Backgrounder posted August 9, 2010 by James M. Roberts Cronyism: Undermining Economic Freedom and Prosperity Around the World

    Abstract: Backroom deals between members of the governing class and their hand-picked cronies influence the legislative, executive, and regulatory actions of governments around the world. Examples of this ancient form of corruption abound. Government intrusions into the private sector as a partner, financier, or outright owner are not only morally hazardous, but…

  • Backgrounder posted May 13, 2008 by James M. Roberts, Israel Ortega How Reforms in Mexico Could Make the U.S. More Secure

    Felipe Calderón, who began his single sexenio (six-year term) as President of Mexico in December 2006, has made significant progress in the fight against narcotrafficking, but Mexicans are still waiting to see whether his government will successfully chal­lenge the private- and public-sector monopolies and duopolies that dominate huge portions of mexico economy. These…

Find more work on Argentina
  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Recognize British Sovereignty Over the Falkland Islands

    In 1982, the United Kingdom, led by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, went to war with Argentina in the South Atlantic to retake the Falkland Islands. Unprovoked, Argentina had invaded the Islands and occupied them for two months. Against the odds, Prime Minister Thatcher assembled a naval task force and deployed it to the South Atlantic to liberate the Islands and their…

  • Issue Brief posted February 27, 2013 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: U.S. Should Support Right to Self-Determination

    On March 10–11, the Falkland Islands, a British Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, will hold a referendum to decide whether to maintain allegiance to Great Britain. The islands are self-governing but maintain the British monarch as their head of state. The referendum is an answer to Argentina, which, though defeated by Britain in the 1982 Falklands War, is again…

  • Issue Brief posted November 26, 2012 by Luke Coffey Argentina No Longer Deserves to Be a Major Non-NATO Ally of the U.S.

    In 1998, President Bill Clinton designated Argentina as a Major Non-NATO Ally (MNNA) of the United States—a highly sought-after status that includes exclusive military-to-military cooperation. Today, only 15 countries in the world enjoy MNNA status. However, Argentina under the leadership of Cristina Fernández de Kirchner is not the dependable and friendly Argentina…

  • Issue Brief posted June 14, 2012 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Falklands War: Lessons of Liberation Ring True for U.S. Today

    Thirty years ago today, the Falkland Islands War between Great Britain and Argentina ended with a cease-fire after a hard-fought British campaign to liberate the islands from their Argentine occupiers. That victory would not have been possible if Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had not launched the daring campaign and if the United States, under President Ronald Reagan,…

  • WebMemo posted February 8, 2012 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D., Ray Walser, Ph.D. Falkland Islands: United States Should Back Great Britain

    In a blatant show of disdain for the Anglo–American Special Relationship, the Obama Administration has weighed in on the mounting tensions between Great Britain and Argentina over the Falkland Islands. Just two days after Prime Minister David Cameron issued a robust statement in the House of Commons in mid-January vowing to defend the sovereignty of the Falklands, the…

  • WebMemo posted June 9, 2011 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. President Obama Should Side with Britain over the Falkland Islands

    President Obama was effusive in his praise for the Special Relationship when he visited London in May, but his Administration continues to slap Britain in the face over the highly sensitive Falkland Islands sovereignty issue by aligning itself with Argentina’s call for U.N.-brokered talks on the future of the islands. This reckless approach toward the U.S.–U.K.…

  • Backgrounder posted March 4, 2011 by James M. Roberts Holding the Kirchners Accountable for Argentina’s Economic Freefall

    Abstract: In Argentina, the rule of law and free-market principles have been weakened dramatically over the past decade. Under the leadership of Nestor and Cristina Kirchner, economic freedom in Argentina has been in a virtual freefall, corruption has been rampant, and the government’s ties to strongmen in the region, such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chávez, are…

  • Backgrounder posted August 9, 2010 by James M. Roberts Cronyism: Undermining Economic Freedom and Prosperity Around the World

    Abstract: Backroom deals between members of the governing class and their hand-picked cronies influence the legislative, executive, and regulatory actions of governments around the world. Examples of this ancient form of corruption abound. Government intrusions into the private sector as a partner, financier, or outright owner are not only morally hazardous, but…

  • WebMemo posted April 22, 2010 by James M. Roberts Cronyism and Corruption Are Killing Economic Freedom in Argentina

    Argentina’s ranking in The Wall Street Journal/Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom—now 135th out of the 179 countries ranked in the Index—has declined steadily in the seven years since President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner and her husband, former President Nestor Kirchner, took power. It is by far the lowest ranked G-20 nation. Recently Charles…

  • Backgrounder posted May 13, 2008 by James M. Roberts, Israel Ortega How Reforms in Mexico Could Make the U.S. More Secure

    Felipe Calderón, who began his single sexenio (six-year term) as President of Mexico in December 2006, has made significant progress in the fight against narcotrafficking, but Mexicans are still waiting to see whether his government will successfully chal­lenge the private- and public-sector monopolies and duopolies that dominate huge portions of mexico economy. These…

Find more work on Argentina
Find more work on Argentina