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Puerto Rico

Our Research & Offerings on Puerto Rico
  • News Releases posted May 3, 2016 by Justin Posey Heritage Expert Responds to Calls for Taxpayer-Funded Bailout of Puerto Rico

    In his letter to Congress yesterday, Treasury Secretary Lew tried to further grease the tracks for a taxpayer-funded bailout of Puerto Rico. Salim Furth, research fellow in macroeconomics at The Heritage Foundation says that’s a bad idea:   “Congress should continue to stand firm and set a clear precedent that local governments and creditors can expect no financial help…

  • Issue Brief posted April 1, 2016 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., Rachel Greszler Draft House Legislation Falls Short of Priorities for Puerto Rico

    Congress should not lose sight of key conservative priorities as it considers whether (and how) to respond to the economic and fiscal crisis in Puerto Rico. The troubled territory has been a laboratory for progressive politics and crony capitalism for decades. Predictably, the government has smothered the private sector, and workers receive a lower share of income in…

  • Issue Brief posted December 29, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Hired Labor’s Share of Income Is Lowest in Puerto Rico

    A smaller share of total income goes to hired labor in Puerto Rico than in any state in the U.S. In Puerto Rico, hired workers take home 25 cents of every dollar in net private-sector income, the rest going to investors, proprietors, and the self-employed.[1] In the U.S. as a whole, employees earn 56 percent of private income. (There are more precise ways to calculate…

  • Commentary posted December 2, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Benefits to Sticking With the Framework for Puerto Rico’s Debt

    Puerto Rico appears to have avoided defaulting on the bond payments due Tuesday. The Economist argued this week that, “one way or another,” the U.S. government “will end up bailing out Puerto Rico.” But the editorial supports that conclusion with two factual errors. First, the editorial says that Puerto Rico’s “government owes $72 billion in debt.” The majority of…

  • Posted on July 8, 2015 by Rachel Greszler Allowing Puerto Rico to Declare Bankruptcy Is Giving It a Bailout

    Puerto Rico is in the midst of a severe economic and financial crisis and is looking for a way out—or in other words—a...…

  • Posted on July 2, 2015 by Mike Gonzalez The ‘Mini Greece’ of the United States

    The inability of Puerto Rican governments to live within their own means is, of course, the reason why the island finds...…

  • Posted on July 1, 2015 by Salim Furth Progressive Paradise Lost

    It’s a progressive paradise. Public employees get 30 vacation days a year. Anyone who works over eight hours in a day...…

  • Issue Brief posted July 1, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Mike Gonzalez, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Puerto Rico Needs Economic Freedom, Not Bailouts

    Puerto Rico is in a debt crisis, and Governor Alejandro García Padilla (D) has announced that “the debt is not payable” given the commonwealth’s large deficits and collapsing economy.[1] Presenting a government-commissioned report, economist Anne Krueger explained that the origin of Puerto Rico’s debt is decades of stimulus spending and economic stagnation: Since 1996,…

  • Posted on January 23, 2014 by Ryan Olson Puerto Rico: America’s Greece

    Pop quiz: Which economy has high unemployment, soaring debt, and beautiful beaches? If you answered Greece, you...…

  • Posted on July 25, 2013 by Gerardo Cruz Hispanics Are Conservative, Too

    According to a recent McLaughlin poll, over 50 percent of Hispanics would vote for a conservative candidate in an...…

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  • Commentary posted December 12, 2010 by Israel Ortega El modelo económico de la Isla del Encanto

    En medio de una de las peores recesiones económicas, nuestro país se encuentra en pleno debate sobre qué hacer para llegar a un acuerdo en el asunto tributario. El acuerdo final tendrá tremendas implicaciones para el próximo año. Para entender por qué importa tanto este debate, deberíamos mirar hacia Puerto Rico para valorar las consecuencias fiscales de un plan acertado…

  • News Releases posted May 3, 2016 by Justin Posey Heritage Expert Responds to Calls for Taxpayer-Funded Bailout of Puerto Rico

    In his letter to Congress yesterday, Treasury Secretary Lew tried to further grease the tracks for a taxpayer-funded bailout of Puerto Rico. Salim Furth, research fellow in macroeconomics at The Heritage Foundation says that’s a bad idea:   “Congress should continue to stand firm and set a clear precedent that local governments and creditors can expect no financial help…

  • Issue Brief posted April 1, 2016 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., Rachel Greszler Draft House Legislation Falls Short of Priorities for Puerto Rico

    Congress should not lose sight of key conservative priorities as it considers whether (and how) to respond to the economic and fiscal crisis in Puerto Rico. The troubled territory has been a laboratory for progressive politics and crony capitalism for decades. Predictably, the government has smothered the private sector, and workers receive a lower share of income in…

  • Commentary posted December 2, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Benefits to Sticking With the Framework for Puerto Rico’s Debt

    Puerto Rico appears to have avoided defaulting on the bond payments due Tuesday. The Economist argued this week that, “one way or another,” the U.S. government “will end up bailing out Puerto Rico.” But the editorial supports that conclusion with two factual errors. First, the editorial says that Puerto Rico’s “government owes $72 billion in debt.” The majority of…

  • Issue Brief posted July 1, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Mike Gonzalez, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Puerto Rico Needs Economic Freedom, Not Bailouts

    Puerto Rico is in a debt crisis, and Governor Alejandro García Padilla (D) has announced that “the debt is not payable” given the commonwealth’s large deficits and collapsing economy.[1] Presenting a government-commissioned report, economist Anne Krueger explained that the origin of Puerto Rico’s debt is decades of stimulus spending and economic stagnation: Since 1996,…

  • Issue Brief posted December 29, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Hired Labor’s Share of Income Is Lowest in Puerto Rico

    A smaller share of total income goes to hired labor in Puerto Rico than in any state in the U.S. In Puerto Rico, hired workers take home 25 cents of every dollar in net private-sector income, the rest going to investors, proprietors, and the self-employed.[1] In the U.S. as a whole, employees earn 56 percent of private income. (There are more precise ways to calculate…

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  • News Releases posted May 3, 2016 by Justin Posey Heritage Expert Responds to Calls for Taxpayer-Funded Bailout of Puerto Rico

    In his letter to Congress yesterday, Treasury Secretary Lew tried to further grease the tracks for a taxpayer-funded bailout of Puerto Rico. Salim Furth, research fellow in macroeconomics at The Heritage Foundation says that’s a bad idea:   “Congress should continue to stand firm and set a clear precedent that local governments and creditors can expect no financial help…

  • Issue Brief posted April 1, 2016 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., Rachel Greszler Draft House Legislation Falls Short of Priorities for Puerto Rico

    Congress should not lose sight of key conservative priorities as it considers whether (and how) to respond to the economic and fiscal crisis in Puerto Rico. The troubled territory has been a laboratory for progressive politics and crony capitalism for decades. Predictably, the government has smothered the private sector, and workers receive a lower share of income in…

  • Issue Brief posted December 29, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Hired Labor’s Share of Income Is Lowest in Puerto Rico

    A smaller share of total income goes to hired labor in Puerto Rico than in any state in the U.S. In Puerto Rico, hired workers take home 25 cents of every dollar in net private-sector income, the rest going to investors, proprietors, and the self-employed.[1] In the U.S. as a whole, employees earn 56 percent of private income. (There are more precise ways to calculate…

  • Issue Brief posted July 1, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Mike Gonzalez, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. Puerto Rico Needs Economic Freedom, Not Bailouts

    Puerto Rico is in a debt crisis, and Governor Alejandro García Padilla (D) has announced that “the debt is not payable” given the commonwealth’s large deficits and collapsing economy.[1] Presenting a government-commissioned report, economist Anne Krueger explained that the origin of Puerto Rico’s debt is decades of stimulus spending and economic stagnation: Since 1996,…

Find more work on Puerto Rico
Find more work on Puerto Rico