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Southeast Asia

Our Research & Offerings on Southeast Asia
  • Testimony posted July 21, 2015 by Walter Lohman The Value of America’s Southeast Asian Alliances

    Testimony before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific Committee on Foreign Affairs United States House of Representatives July 15, 2015 Walter Lohman Director of the Asian Studies Center The Heritage Foundation My name is Walter Lohman. I am director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own, and should…

  • Issue Brief posted June 15, 2015 by Olivia Enos Achieving Resolution in the Southeast Asian Migrant Crisis

    More than 4,800 Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants have landed on the shores of Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma, and Thailand over the past several weeks.[1] The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) estimates that as many as 2,000 additional migrants may still need to be rescued.[2] While many migrants have safely reached shore, their journey is far from over. Even after the…

  • Issue Brief posted May 8, 2015 by Olivia Enos How to Assess Human Trafficking in Asia

    The State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons will release its annual Trafficking in Person (TIP) report in June. Ahead of final deliberations, the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations held a hearing to discuss the significance of the seminal TIP report’s…

  • Issue Brief posted April 28, 2015 by Dean Cheng America Needs a Comprehensive Strategy for Countering China’s Expanding Perimeter of National Interests

    What do Central Asia, the South China Sea, the Internet, and outer space have in common? All of these are parts of China’s expanding perimeter of national interest. Over the past decade, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has demonstrated a willingness to use its increasing economic influence to pressure neighboring countries in physical geographic disputes and to…

  • Backgrounder posted February 26, 2015 by Lisa Curtis, Olivia Enos Combating Human Trafficking in Asia Requires U.S. Leadership

    Despite increased U.S. foreign policy attention over the past decade, human trafficking remains widespread and deeply entrenched in many Asian countries. The precise number of people being trafficked is difficult to estimate, but new studies suggest nearly 36 million victims worldwide. Of those 36 million, nearly two-thirds are from Asia.[1] Total profits from worldwide…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Walter Lohman Widodo's Early Moves Suggest Continuity, not Change

    International leaders gained their first measure of Indonesia's dynamic new president Joko Widodo in the round of Asian summits in mid-November. At home, Widodo has a reputation as a populist, a problem solver, and a regular guy. Abroad, he was -- and still is -- a largely unknown quantity. Early signs point to a continuation of the "free and active" foreign policy…

  • Posted on March 27, 2014 by Olivia Enos Asia Pivot Should Be More Than Just Rhetoric and Good Intentions

    President Obama’s impending trip to Asia in April is an opportunity for the U.S. to go beyond mere rhetorical commitment...…

  • Posted on March 25, 2014 by Olivia Enos Indonesia: Elections an Opportunity for Improved Governance

    Upcoming parliamentary and presidential elections in Indonesia are heating up after the Indonesian Democratic Party of...…

  • Testimony posted March 13, 2014 by Walter Lohman A China Focused Policy for Southeast Asia

    Testimony before the US-China Economic and Security Review My name is Walter Lohman. I am Director of the Asian Studies Center at The Heritage Foundation. The views I express in this testimony are my own and should not be construed as representing any official position of The Heritage Foundation. Now and for many decades to come, peace and prosperity in the Western…

  • Posted on January 23, 2014 by Olivia Enos The State of Economic Freedom in Asia

    Asia is home to some of the economically freest and least free nations in the world, according to the recently...…

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  • Issue Brief posted April 28, 2015 by Dean Cheng America Needs a Comprehensive Strategy for Countering China’s Expanding Perimeter of National Interests

    What do Central Asia, the South China Sea, the Internet, and outer space have in common? All of these are parts of China’s expanding perimeter of national interest. Over the past decade, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has demonstrated a willingness to use its increasing economic influence to pressure neighboring countries in physical geographic disputes and to…

  • Commentary posted February 6, 2009 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Mumbai Massacres: We Can't Respond Without the Facts

    On a business-as-usual morning in March 2004, terrorists launched a coordinated attack on Madrid commuter trains killing 191 people and wounding 1,755. The government, with only three days remaining before general elections, quickly blamed Basque-separatists groups. Almost all the conclusions reached in the immediate wake of the bombings turned out to be wrong.…

  • Commentary posted August 20, 2009 by Bruce Klingner Through the (North Korean) Looking Glass

    Ironies abound in the current United States policy toward North Korea. Someone awakening from a long slumber could be forgiven for concluding that a naively liberal president George W Bush had been replaced by neo-conservative Barack Obama. Moreover, one would assume that the majority of mainstream media must also be neo-conservative since there had been nary a…

  • Commentary posted June 22, 2009 by Bruce Klingner It's Not Right Time to Discuss OPCON Transfer

    The U.S.-South Korean 2007 decision to transfer wartime operational control, or OPCON of South Korea forces to Seoul in April 2012 continues to be a lightning rod of controversy. The decision has obvious military ramifications, since it alters a fundamental precept of the bilateral alliance between Washington and Seoul. It also strikes a serious security nerve…

  • Executive Memorandum posted May 13, 2002 by Paolo Pasicolan Strengthening the U.S.-Philippine Alliance for Fighting Terrorism

    The war on terrorism has given the United States and the Philippines a chance to revive their dormant alliance. The Philippines is leading efforts to combat terrorism in Southeast Asia, a region FBI Director Robert Mueller describes as a possible sanctuary for al-Qaeda operatives fleeing Afghanistan. Washington has provided Manila with $100 million in military aid,…

  • WebMemo posted July 12, 2006 by Daniella Markheim, Dana Robert Dillon The Case for Permanent Normal Trading Relations with Vietnam

    On May 31, America and Vietnam signed a bilateral market access agreement detailing the requirements for Vietnam's accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO). Vietnam will now work to finalize a multilateral draft Protocol of Accession that must be approved by the WTO General Council before it can become a WTO member. In order for the U.S. to share in the…

  • WebMemo posted September 7, 2006 by Lisa Curtis, Baker Spring Maintaining Momentum on U.S.-India Civil Nuclear Deal

    Despite the warming in U.S.-India ties over the last several years, tensions over India's nuclear program have persisted, preventing the two countries from overcoming a deep-rooted mistrust. Successful completion of a civil nuclear accord will help to lift these suspicions so that the U.S.-India relationship can finally realize its potential. In addition to bringing…

  • Issue Brief posted June 15, 2015 by Olivia Enos Achieving Resolution in the Southeast Asian Migrant Crisis

    More than 4,800 Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants have landed on the shores of Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma, and Thailand over the past several weeks.[1] The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) estimates that as many as 2,000 additional migrants may still need to be rescued.[2] While many migrants have safely reached shore, their journey is far from over. Even after the…

  • WebMemo posted December 4, 2006 by Lisa Curtis, John J. Tkacik, Jr. China and India: Thawing Relations Unlikely to Lead to Strategic Partnership

    Chinese President Hu Jintao's late November visit to India reflects the strange geopolitical calculus behind Beijing's foreign policy. China's diplomatic strategy to counter close U.S.-India ties involves both hardball threats and softball prospects of increased trade and investment. India, for its part, is interested in having cordial ties with its increasingly…

  • Issue Brief posted May 8, 2015 by Olivia Enos How to Assess Human Trafficking in Asia

    The State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons will release its annual Trafficking in Person (TIP) report in June. Ahead of final deliberations, the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations held a hearing to discuss the significance of the seminal TIP report’s…

Find more work on Southeast Asia
  • Issue Brief posted June 15, 2015 by Olivia Enos Achieving Resolution in the Southeast Asian Migrant Crisis

    More than 4,800 Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants have landed on the shores of Malaysia, Indonesia, Burma, and Thailand over the past several weeks.[1] The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) estimates that as many as 2,000 additional migrants may still need to be rescued.[2] While many migrants have safely reached shore, their journey is far from over. Even after the…

  • Issue Brief posted May 8, 2015 by Olivia Enos How to Assess Human Trafficking in Asia

    The State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons will release its annual Trafficking in Person (TIP) report in June. Ahead of final deliberations, the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations held a hearing to discuss the significance of the seminal TIP report’s…

  • Issue Brief posted April 28, 2015 by Dean Cheng America Needs a Comprehensive Strategy for Countering China’s Expanding Perimeter of National Interests

    What do Central Asia, the South China Sea, the Internet, and outer space have in common? All of these are parts of China’s expanding perimeter of national interest. Over the past decade, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has demonstrated a willingness to use its increasing economic influence to pressure neighboring countries in physical geographic disputes and to…

  • Issue Brief posted November 16, 2012 by Walter Lohman The U.S.–Thailand Alliance and President Obama's Trip to Asia

    President Obama’s visit to Southeast Asia this week will take him to Cambodia, Burma, and Thailand. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) leaders’ meetings in Phnom Penh is the occasion for the transpacific flight, and Burma will generate the most news. It is Thailand, however, that is the most strategically important part of the trip. The political…

  • Backgrounder posted September 24, 2012 by Renato Cruz De Castro, Walter Lohman Getting the Philippines Air Force Flying Again: The Role of the U.S.–Philippines Alliance

    Abstract: The recent standoff at Scarborough Shoal between the Philippines and China demonstrates how Beijing is targeting Manila in its strategy of maritime brinkmanship. Manila’s weakness stems from the Philippine Air Force’s (PAF) lack of air-defense system and air-surveillance capabilities to patrol and protect Philippine airspace and maritime territory. The…

  • White Paper posted July 17, 2012 by Walter Lohman, John Fleming, Robert Warshaw Key Asian Indicators: A Book of Charts

    America’s Enduring Leadership in Asia America has been engaged in Asia since a few decades after securing its independence. Its early interest is documented in the 1833 Treaty on Amity and Commerce between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Siam Thailand), and later in the market-opening 1854 Treaty of Kanagawa with Japan. The U.S. has, in fact, been a “resident…

  • Special Report posted April 6, 2012 by James M. Roberts Reducing Corruption Will Increase Economic Freedom in The Philippines

    Executive Summary In 2010, President Benigno S. (“Noynoy”) Aquino III made a pledge to voters: If elected, he would reduce long-standing and endemic corruption in the Philippines. While such reform is indeed underway, as the 2012 Index of Economic Freedom makes clear, there is still much work to be done. The Philippines is a diverse country. Its population…

  • Backgrounder posted September 28, 2011 by Walter Lohman Reinvigorating the U.S.–Thailand Alliance

    Abstract: The United States and Thailand have a long history of close relations. After 9/11, the U.S. renewed its attention to the relationship, identifying shared interests and values. The military coup in 2006 weakened the relationship, but the return of a newly elected civilian government may present an opening for the U.S. to reinvigorate economic, political, and…

  • Backgrounder posted August 8, 2011 by Renato Cruz De Castro, Walter Lohman U.S.–Philippines Partnership in the Cause of Maritime Defense

    Abstract: Events in the South China Sea this year illustrate once again the urgent need for the Philippines to shift its focus from internal security to maritime defense. The U.S.–Philippines Mutual Defense Treaty, the Visiting Forces Agreement, deeply embedded consultation mechanisms, and a century of friendship, cooperation, and mutual sacrifice provide the framework…

  • WebMemo posted August 5, 2011 by Walter Lohman The U.S. Cannot Rely on ASEAN in the South China Sea

    For weeks now, commentary has been flying about the “progress” made on the South China Sea dispute at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) annual foreign minister consultations in Bali. Because America’s approach to Southeast Asia, and to some extent East Asia broadly, is increasingly carried out in the ASEAN context, it is important to look at exactly what…

Find more work on Southeast Asia
Find more work on Southeast Asia