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Arctic

Our Research & Offerings on Arctic
  • Commentary posted October 28, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. America is leaving itself out in the Arctic cold

    It’s the grand prize in a globalized world — owning the shortest trade route between Asia, Europe and North America. In 1845, Sir John Franklin set out to grab that prize. Determined to map the Northwest Passage, he organized the best outfitted expedition in the history of polar exploration. Hulls were reinforced with iron planks for icebreaking. Each ship had…

  • Issue Brief posted August 28, 2013 by Luke Coffey Priorities for President Obama’s Visit to Sweden

    President Barack Obama will visit Sweden on September 4 en route to the G20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia. The timing of this visit is important. The decision to visit Sweden was announced after the White House cancelled the U.S.–Russia summit, scheduled for September, due to a lack of progress in the U.S.–Russia bilateral relationship. Also, like his meeting at the…

  • Issue Brief posted April 2, 2013 by Brian Slattery, Luke Coffey Strengthen the Coast Guard’s Presence in the Arctic

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important to U.S. national interests. Ice in the Arctic has reached the lowest level since records began in 1979, opening up new possibilities for maritime trade, tourism, and natural resource exploration. Consequently, more actors than ever before will be operating in the Arctic region. This reality will present both…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2013 by Luke Coffey Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy on Arctic Security

    In the coming weeks, the United States Senate will begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House chief counterterrorism advisor John Brennan for director of the CIA. All three have been prominent backers of President…

  • Issue Brief posted August 15, 2012 by Luke Coffey Arctic Region: U.S. Policy on Arctic Security

    The Arctic region is home to some of the roughest terrain and harshest weather found anywhere in the world. Arctic ice is increasingly melting during the summer months, causing new challenges for the U.S. in terms of Arctic security. For example, the decreasing presence of ice will mean new shipping lanes opening, increased tourism, and further natural resource…

  • Heritage in Focus: Is Arctic Policy Making Waves in Shipping and Trade? Audio Recorded on August 13, 2012 Heritage in Focus: Is Arctic Policy Making Waves in Shipping and Trade?

    How is arctic policy pertinent to new ideas in exports, trade and tourism? Luke Coffey, Margaret Thatcher Fellow at the Center for Freedom at the Heritage Foundation discusses how new innovations in arctic policy can - and probably will - open new doors. Jackie Anderson hosts.…

  • Issue Brief posted June 22, 2012 by Luke Coffey NATO in the Arctic: Challenges and Opportunities

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important for a number of geostrategic reasons. Thawing ice allows lucrative shipping lanes to open and increases the possibility of natural resource exploration. Since four of the five Arctic littoral countries, in addition to Iceland, are also members of NATO, the alliance cannot afford to ignore the Arctic. The U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted March 28, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Sally McNamara, Richard Weitz, Ph.D. EUCOM Should Lead U.S. Combatant Commands in Defense of National Interests in the Arctic

    Abstract: Eight countries hold vast territories in the Arctic: the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Denmark (via Greenland), Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. All eight countries are positioning themselves to protect their sovereignty, defend their competing territorial claims, and develop significant natural resources. Future disputes could involve shipping routes,…

  • WebMemo posted February 24, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., James Dean Breaking an Ice-Bound U.S. Policy: A Proposal for Operating in the Arctic

    The United States is losing the race to protect its own interests in the Arctic region. It is important to create a sensible policy to field an adequate fleet of U.S.-owned ice-breakers. An adequate, competent, and sustainable fleet is the key to maintaining American presence in the region, protecting U.S. sovereignty, working with allies, and rebuilding the nation’s edge…

  • WebMemo posted February 23, 2010 by Mackenzie Eaglen U.S. Coast Guard at Risk: Modernization Plans Sinking Under Budget Constraints

    Given the backbreaking demands currently placed on American forces around the world, the U.S. military’s significant humanitarian response efforts in Haiti have been extraordinary. This response has been led by the frequently forgotten fifth member of the U.S. Armed Forces: the U.S. Coast Guard. Yet despite its vital contribution to homeland defense and international…

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  • WebMemo posted February 23, 2010 by Mackenzie Eaglen U.S. Coast Guard at Risk: Modernization Plans Sinking Under Budget Constraints

    Given the backbreaking demands currently placed on American forces around the world, the U.S. military’s significant humanitarian response efforts in Haiti have been extraordinary. This response has been led by the frequently forgotten fifth member of the U.S. Armed Forces: the U.S. Coast Guard. Yet despite its vital contribution to homeland defense and international…

  • WebMemo posted August 3, 2009 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. National Security Not a Good Argument for Global Warming Legislation

    The Waxman-Markey cap-and-trade bill has engendered tremendous controversy. Concerns abound about the legislation's adverse economic consequences as well as skepticism of its affects on world climate trends. Faced with mounting opposition, the bill's supporters are increasingly making the case that creating a new law is a national security imperative. They are…

  • Issue Brief posted April 2, 2013 by Brian Slattery, Luke Coffey Strengthen the Coast Guard’s Presence in the Arctic

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important to U.S. national interests. Ice in the Arctic has reached the lowest level since records began in 1979, opening up new possibilities for maritime trade, tourism, and natural resource exploration. Consequently, more actors than ever before will be operating in the Arctic region. This reality will present both…

  • WebMemo posted February 24, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., James Dean Breaking an Ice-Bound U.S. Policy: A Proposal for Operating in the Arctic

    The United States is losing the race to protect its own interests in the Arctic region. It is important to create a sensible policy to field an adequate fleet of U.S.-owned ice-breakers. An adequate, competent, and sustainable fleet is the key to maintaining American presence in the region, protecting U.S. sovereignty, working with allies, and rebuilding the nation’s edge…

  • Issue Brief posted June 22, 2012 by Luke Coffey NATO in the Arctic: Challenges and Opportunities

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important for a number of geostrategic reasons. Thawing ice allows lucrative shipping lanes to open and increases the possibility of natural resource exploration. Since four of the five Arctic littoral countries, in addition to Iceland, are also members of NATO, the alliance cannot afford to ignore the Arctic. The U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted October 30, 2008 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Lajos F. Szaszdi, Ph.D., Jim Dolbow The New Cold War: Reviving the U.S. Presence in the Arctic

    The Arctic is quickly reemerging as a strategic area where vital U.S. interests are at stake. The geopolitical and geo-economic importance of the Arctic region is rising rapidly, and its mineral wealth will likely transform the region into a booming economic frontier in the 21st century. The coasts and continental shelf of the Arctic Ocean are estimated to hold large…

  • Backgrounder posted March 28, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Sally McNamara, Richard Weitz, Ph.D. EUCOM Should Lead U.S. Combatant Commands in Defense of National Interests in the Arctic

    Abstract: Eight countries hold vast territories in the Arctic: the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Denmark (via Greenland), Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. All eight countries are positioning themselves to protect their sovereignty, defend their competing territorial claims, and develop significant natural resources. Future disputes could involve shipping routes,…

  • WebMemo posted August 13, 2009 by Ben Lieberman Five Things Congress and the President Are Doing to Bring Back Sky-High Gas Prices

    Gasoline prices are up since the start of the year, but the summer of 2009 has thus far been a bargain at the pump compared to a year ago when prices exceeded $4 a gallon. However, the respite from sky-high prices is likely temporary. A return to $4 a gallon gas--or higher--will be made even more certain if Congress and the President succeed in enacting a host…

  • Commentary posted August 8, 2007 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Russia's Race for the Arctic

    By planting the Russian flag on the seabed under the North Pole and claiming a sector of the Continental Shelf the size of Western Europe, Moscow generated a new source of international tension, seemingly out of the blue. Geopolitics and geoeconomics are driving Moscow's latest moves. The potential profits are certainly compelling. Geologists believe a quarter of…

  • WebMemo posted March 2, 2009 by Ben Lieberman Global Warming: Using the Polar Bear to Impose Costly Measures

    In 2008, the Bush Administration, responding to litigation from an environmental group, listed the polar bear under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Bush Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne also made some changes to the implementation of the ESA in order to limit the adverse consequences. But now, the omnibus appropriations bill, first passed by the House and…

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  • Issue Brief posted August 28, 2013 by Luke Coffey Priorities for President Obama’s Visit to Sweden

    President Barack Obama will visit Sweden on September 4 en route to the G20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia. The timing of this visit is important. The decision to visit Sweden was announced after the White House cancelled the U.S.–Russia summit, scheduled for September, due to a lack of progress in the U.S.–Russia bilateral relationship. Also, like his meeting at the…

  • Issue Brief posted April 2, 2013 by Brian Slattery, Luke Coffey Strengthen the Coast Guard’s Presence in the Arctic

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important to U.S. national interests. Ice in the Arctic has reached the lowest level since records began in 1979, opening up new possibilities for maritime trade, tourism, and natural resource exploration. Consequently, more actors than ever before will be operating in the Arctic region. This reality will present both…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2013 by Luke Coffey Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy on Arctic Security

    In the coming weeks, the United States Senate will begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House chief counterterrorism advisor John Brennan for director of the CIA. All three have been prominent backers of President…

  • Issue Brief posted August 15, 2012 by Luke Coffey Arctic Region: U.S. Policy on Arctic Security

    The Arctic region is home to some of the roughest terrain and harshest weather found anywhere in the world. Arctic ice is increasingly melting during the summer months, causing new challenges for the U.S. in terms of Arctic security. For example, the decreasing presence of ice will mean new shipping lanes opening, increased tourism, and further natural resource…

  • Issue Brief posted June 22, 2012 by Luke Coffey NATO in the Arctic: Challenges and Opportunities

    The Arctic region is becoming increasingly important for a number of geostrategic reasons. Thawing ice allows lucrative shipping lanes to open and increases the possibility of natural resource exploration. Since four of the five Arctic littoral countries, in addition to Iceland, are also members of NATO, the alliance cannot afford to ignore the Arctic. The U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted March 28, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Sally McNamara, Richard Weitz, Ph.D. EUCOM Should Lead U.S. Combatant Commands in Defense of National Interests in the Arctic

    Abstract: Eight countries hold vast territories in the Arctic: the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Denmark (via Greenland), Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. All eight countries are positioning themselves to protect their sovereignty, defend their competing territorial claims, and develop significant natural resources. Future disputes could involve shipping routes,…

  • WebMemo posted February 24, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., James Dean Breaking an Ice-Bound U.S. Policy: A Proposal for Operating in the Arctic

    The United States is losing the race to protect its own interests in the Arctic region. It is important to create a sensible policy to field an adequate fleet of U.S.-owned ice-breakers. An adequate, competent, and sustainable fleet is the key to maintaining American presence in the region, protecting U.S. sovereignty, working with allies, and rebuilding the nation’s edge…

  • WebMemo posted February 23, 2010 by Mackenzie Eaglen U.S. Coast Guard at Risk: Modernization Plans Sinking Under Budget Constraints

    Given the backbreaking demands currently placed on American forces around the world, the U.S. military’s significant humanitarian response efforts in Haiti have been extraordinary. This response has been led by the frequently forgotten fifth member of the U.S. Armed Forces: the U.S. Coast Guard. Yet despite its vital contribution to homeland defense and international…

  • WebMemo posted August 26, 2009 by Ben Lieberman, J.D. Foster, Ph.D. Blaming Oil Speculators: A Costly Diversion from Real Solutions to Rising Oil Prices

    The price of oil, having soared to an all-time high in July 2008 before plummeting by nearly 75 percent, is rising again and is likely to climb ever higher as the economy recovers. Of course, rational solutions, such as unlocking America's restricted oil potential, appear to be off the table for the Obama Administration and the current Congress. Partially…

  • WebMemo posted August 13, 2009 by Ben Lieberman Five Things Congress and the President Are Doing to Bring Back Sky-High Gas Prices

    Gasoline prices are up since the start of the year, but the summer of 2009 has thus far been a bargain at the pump compared to a year ago when prices exceeded $4 a gallon. However, the respite from sky-high prices is likely temporary. A return to $4 a gallon gas--or higher--will be made even more certain if Congress and the President succeed in enacting a host…

Find more work on Arctic
Find more work on Arctic