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Egypt

Our Research & Offerings on Egypt
  • Commentary posted August 17, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Strong, Stable Egypt Vital to U.S. Interests

    A compelling case for cutting off aid to Egypt could have been made before President Mohamed Morsi was bounced from office. After all, Morsi was well on his way to placing the country under an Islamist regime — forever. That’s why he shut down foreign non-governmental organizations, curtailed civil rights and decreed the presidency superior to the courts. When the…

  • Commentary posted July 12, 2013 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Coups, Democracy and Other Questions in Egypt

    Sen. John McCain thinks we should cut off aid to Egypt. It’s a “coup,” the Arizona Republican and 2008 presidential candidate says, and the law requires it. He’s right that former President Mohammed Morsi’s ouster by the army was a coup. And Mr. McCain may even be right that the law requires cutting off aid. Less clear is whether he’s right as a matter of policy. It…

  • Commentary posted July 9, 2013 by Bryan Riley Egyptians Need More Than a Change of Presidents

    Egypt has a new president. But as the people of Egypt have already learned, a new president does not necessarily mean better policies. For decades, Egypt’s political leaders have denied their people economic freedom—and it has cost the citizens dearly. According to the 2013 Index of Economic Freedom economic freedom in Egypt is below par—both globally and even within the…

  • Commentary posted October 15, 2012 by James Phillips Egypt’s “Arab Spring” Descends into an Islamist Winter

    Since the February 2011 overthrow of the Mubarak government, Egypt has steadily drifted away from the West in general and the United States in particular.  This trend accelerated after the Muslim Brotherhood, a radical anti-western Islamist movement, consolidated control over Egypt’s new government this summer. Mohamed Morsi, a longtime member of the brotherhood, was…

  • Commentary posted September 26, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Department of Babel

    Say what you will about the controversial Cairo statement released by the U.S. embassy in Egypt only hours before the tsunami of anti-American protests that swept the Islamic world -- the Long Telegram it was not. The statement was so bad (to the point of lacking appropriate punctuation at one point) that it produced a rare moment of true bipartisanship -- neither…

  • Play Movie Libya, Egypt, and the Embassy Attacks - Peter Brookes on Fox News Video Recorded on September 18, 2012 Libya, Egypt, and the Embassy Attacks - Peter Brookes on Fox News

    Senior Fellow Peter Brookes explains the latest from the Middle East and North Africa after U.S. embassies overseas have been subject to multiple anti-American attacks.…

  • Commentary posted June 14, 2012 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Democracy is more than elections

    It’s a democratic election, but the choice is between representatives of two strains of anti-democratic forces: an Islamist party and a repressive military. This weekend’s runoff election for Egyptian president pits Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood against former Gen. Ahmed Shafiq,who served as the Mubarak regime’s last prime minister. How did Egypt come to…

  • PODCAST: James Carafano on Unrest in Egypt, Heritage in Focus Audio Recorded on February 1, 2011 PODCAST: James Carafano on Unrest in Egypt, Heritage in Focus

    In this week's Heritage in Focus podcast, James Carafano discusses the political situation in Egypt and its meaning for American policy in the Middle East. David Weinberger hosts. To get regular updates on Heritage in Focus podcasts, visit our RSS feed or subscribe on iTunes. To listen to more Heritage in Focus podcasts, return to the Podcast page.…

  • Play Movie Peter Brookes on Egypt on FNC Video Recorded on January 31, 2011 Peter Brookes on Egypt on FNC

    Peter Brookes discusses the escalating situation in Egypt.…

  • Play Movie James Carafano on Unrest in Egypt on FNC Video Recorded on January 29, 2011 James Carafano on Unrest in Egypt on FNC

    James Carafano discusses the protests in Egypt.…

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  • Commentary posted August 17, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Strong, Stable Egypt Vital to U.S. Interests

    A compelling case for cutting off aid to Egypt could have been made before President Mohamed Morsi was bounced from office. After all, Morsi was well on his way to placing the country under an Islamist regime — forever. That’s why he shut down foreign non-governmental organizations, curtailed civil rights and decreed the presidency superior to the courts. When the…

  • Commentary posted July 12, 2013 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Coups, Democracy and Other Questions in Egypt

    Sen. John McCain thinks we should cut off aid to Egypt. It’s a “coup,” the Arizona Republican and 2008 presidential candidate says, and the law requires it. He’s right that former President Mohammed Morsi’s ouster by the army was a coup. And Mr. McCain may even be right that the law requires cutting off aid. Less clear is whether he’s right as a matter of policy. It…

  • Commentary posted July 9, 2013 by Bryan Riley Egyptians Need More Than a Change of Presidents

    Egypt has a new president. But as the people of Egypt have already learned, a new president does not necessarily mean better policies. For decades, Egypt’s political leaders have denied their people economic freedom—and it has cost the citizens dearly. According to the 2013 Index of Economic Freedom economic freedom in Egypt is below par—both globally and even within the…

  • Commentary posted October 15, 2012 by James Phillips Egypt’s “Arab Spring” Descends into an Islamist Winter

    Since the February 2011 overthrow of the Mubarak government, Egypt has steadily drifted away from the West in general and the United States in particular.  This trend accelerated after the Muslim Brotherhood, a radical anti-western Islamist movement, consolidated control over Egypt’s new government this summer. Mohamed Morsi, a longtime member of the brotherhood, was…

  • Commentary posted June 14, 2012 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Democracy is more than elections

    It’s a democratic election, but the choice is between representatives of two strains of anti-democratic forces: an Islamist party and a repressive military. This weekend’s runoff election for Egyptian president pits Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood against former Gen. Ahmed Shafiq,who served as the Mubarak regime’s last prime minister. How did Egypt come to…

  • Commentary posted September 26, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Department of Babel

    Say what you will about the controversial Cairo statement released by the U.S. embassy in Egypt only hours before the tsunami of anti-American protests that swept the Islamic world -- the Long Telegram it was not. The statement was so bad (to the point of lacking appropriate punctuation at one point) that it produced a rare moment of true bipartisanship -- neither…

Find more work on Egypt
Find more work on Egypt