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Africa

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  • Issue Brief posted October 17, 2014 by David S. Addington Ebola: U.S. Government Civilian and Military Assistance in West Africa

    The U.S. government has substantial efforts under way in West Africa to provide humanitarian assistance to combat the outbreak of the Ebola virus disease and thereby also help prevent the spread of Ebola elsewhere. U.S. government civilians under the direction of the U.S. ambassador, and U.S. military personnel under the Commander of the Joint Force Command (JFC), work…

  • Issue Brief posted February 26, 2015 by Anthony B. Kim, Charlotte Florance, Brett D. Schaefer Time to Renew and Enhance the African Growth and Opportunity Act

    The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) is at a critical juncture for America’s economic engagement with Africa. The current AGOA is set to expire on September 30, 2015. Although both Congress and the Obama Administration have repeatedly expressed their intention for a “seamless” renewal, they need to act quickly and decisively to ensure that uncertainty does not…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2003 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. U.S. Military Assistance for Africa: A Better Solution

    The United States is facing increasing international pressure to play a more prominent role on the world's most troubled continent. The continuing civil wars in Liberia and the Congo, the specter of tyranny and man-made famine in Zimbabwe, the global spread of infectious diseases, and the rising threat of international terrorism in East Africa are all issues of…

  • Commentary posted August 16, 2002 by Adam Wallace ed081602b: African Aid Blues

    Bono still hasn't found what he's looking for in Africa -- a place free of poverty and the disease and famine that often accompany it. That's why the lead singer of the rock group U2 has crisscrossed the continent with several key Western policy-makers, including Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill. While on these visits, Bono has touted his prescriptions to heal…

  • Backgrounder on April 13, 1979 Rhodesia and Case-Javits

    (Archived document, may contain errors) 81 April 13, 1979 RHODESIA AND CASE-JA VITS INTRODUCTION On March 28, 1979, the U.S. Senate voted 66-27 to send a team of observers to Rhodesia to monitor the election scheduled for mid April. The measure was sponsored by Senators Hayakawa and McGovern, both of whom had recently visited Rhodesia. The election will…

  • Executive Memorandum on July 5, 1985 New U.S. Options in Angola and Namibia

    (Archived document, may contain errors) 7/5/85 85 NEW U.S. OPTIONS IN ANGOLA AND NAMIBIA The time has come for the United States -to change its policy toward Angola and Namibia. For several years the U.S. has tried to broker an accommodation between South Africa and the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), the Marxist group which…

  • Backgrounder posted June 13, 2001 by James Phillips To Stop Sudan's Brutal Jihad, Support Sudan's Opposition

    Sudan, Africa's largest country, has been convulsed for 18 years by a brutal civil war that has claimed 2 million lives. Once dubbed "the forgotten war," Sudan's internal conflict has attracted growing international attention because of mounting evidence that Sudan's radical Islamic regime has resorted to systematic bombing of civilians, starvation, slavery,…

  • Commentary posted November 14, 2013 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Oil and gas attract pirates to Gulf of Guinea

    Piracy in West Africa grabbed global headlines when two American sailors were kidnapped during an attack on an oil supply vessel off the Nigerian coast. The captain and chief engineer, both US citizens, were released in early November 2013, nearly three weeks later. These were not the first kidnappings of Americans by pirates. But the latest incident garnered…

  • Commentary posted February 5, 2006 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. African Union: Another Club of Executives?

    Under President Denis Sassou-Nguesso of the Republic of Congo, the African Union (AU) will continue to face critical issues that challenge not only the region, but also the ability to maintain its credibility on the international stage. The African Union wants very much to be perceived as a diplomatic heavyweight at the United Nations. To its credit,…

  • Commentary posted July 16, 2003 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Handling the Unexpected

    Campaign promises sometimes seem as if they're made only to be broken.                         Still, an apparent flip-flop can make news. As President Bush traveled around Africa recently, CNN replayed a comment he'd made during one of the 2000 presidential debates: "[Africa's] an important continent. But there's got to be priorities, and the Middle East is a…

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  • Issue Brief posted May 4, 2016 by Joshua Meservey Record-Setting Drought in Africa Requires U.S. Leadership on Disaster Relief

    The latest iteration of El Niño—a recurring weather pattern associated with warmer Pacific Ocean temperatures—is one of the strongest ever recorded. The higher temperatures it has brought, coupled with unusually low rainfall in a number of countries, has since early 2015 created a drought in swathes of Africa more severe than has been seen in decades. The drought has…

  • Issue Brief posted February 17, 2016 by Joshua Meservey Uganda’s Upcoming Presidential Elections: Implications for the U.S.–Uganda Relationship

    The East African nation of Uganda will elect its next president on February 18. As is sometimes the case, the United States will have to find a way during this election to remain true to its democratic principles while constructively engaging with an ally who has achieved a level of stability and economic prosperity, but who has also grown increasingly undemocratic. The…

  • Issue Brief posted January 15, 2016 by Joshua Meservey Four U.S. Policy Priorities for Africa in 2016

    There were some positive developments for U.S. interests in Africa in 2015. Nigeria, the continent’s most populous nation and boasting its largest economy, peacefully elected a new president. Congress reaffirmed the U.S.’s commitment to Tunisia, a fledgling democratic ally in the crosshairs of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The African Growth and Opportunity…

  • Issue Brief posted July 24, 2015 by Joshua Meservey, Anthony B. Kim The President’s Last Trip to Africa: Focus on Promoting Economic Freedom and the Rule of Law

    On July 24, President Barack Obama will travel to Kenya before continuing on to Ethiopia. President Obama’s final trip to Africa is intended to underscore the Administration’s efforts “to work with the countries and citizens of sub-Saharan Africa to accelerate economic growth, strengthen democratic institutions, and improve security.”[1] In fact, these ideas are not new.…

  • Backgrounder posted April 7, 2015 by Dakota Wood, Charlotte Florance, James Phillips Intervention in Libya: Lessons in Leading

    Weeds of the Arab Spring The Arab Spring undoubtedly changed the political, economic, and security landscape in the Middle East and North Africa. More than four years after the self-immolation of Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi and the catalytic explosion of the event on social media among Arab youth populations, authoritarian regimes quickly came under fire,…

  • Issue Brief posted February 26, 2015 by Anthony B. Kim, Charlotte Florance, Brett D. Schaefer Time to Renew and Enhance the African Growth and Opportunity Act

    The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) is at a critical juncture for America’s economic engagement with Africa. The current AGOA is set to expire on September 30, 2015. Although both Congress and the Obama Administration have repeatedly expressed their intention for a “seamless” renewal, they need to act quickly and decisively to ensure that uncertainty does not…

  • Issue Brief posted November 13, 2014 by Charlotte Florance Nine Questions for the House Ebola Hearing

    Over the past seven months, Ebola has infected more than 13,000 people and claimed nearly 5,000 lives. Most of the infected people have been in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Both Nigeria and Senegal successfully overcame transportation-related cases in their countries and were declared Ebola-free by the World Health Organization on October 20. The virus has also…

  • Issue Brief posted October 17, 2014 by David S. Addington Ebola: U.S. Government Civilian and Military Assistance in West Africa

    The U.S. government has substantial efforts under way in West Africa to provide humanitarian assistance to combat the outbreak of the Ebola virus disease and thereby also help prevent the spread of Ebola elsewhere. U.S. government civilians under the direction of the U.S. ambassador, and U.S. military personnel under the Commander of the Joint Force Command (JFC), work…

  • Issue Brief posted October 15, 2014 by David S. Addington Ebola: The Basics

    The spread of the Ebola virus raises substantial public health concerns in the United States and abroad. With the proper leadership and use of available resources, the U.S. can address these concerns effectively. Appropriate U.S. government humanitarian assistance to address the Ebola situation in West Africa, and measured and coordinated deployment at home of federal,…

  • Issue Brief posted August 4, 2014 by Brett D. Schaefer, Charlotte Florance, Anthony B. Kim Setting a Course for Obama’s Rudderless Africa Policy

    A‌frican leaders and citizens had great expectations ‌in 2008 that the election of President Barack Obama would elevate the prominence of Africa and its concerns in U.S. government deliberations. These expectations have not been met with concrete policy action. During President Obama’s first four years in office, he spent less than 24 hours in Africa, making a brief…

Find more work on Africa
Find more work on Africa