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Prime Minister Vladimir Putin

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  • Commentary posted July 30, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. What’s at stake in Ukraine?

    What’s at stake in Ukraine? If the actions of Western governments speak louder than words, the short answer is “not much.” The full range of sanctions on Russia has not yet been imposed, and there is a widespread reluctance to embrace Ukraine too closely. But what if our reluctance is a mistake? We could end up undoing the entire post-Cold War order in Europe. It’s…

  • Commentary posted May 21, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Vladimir Putin's New Fifth International

    In the recent makeshift referenda in Donetsk and Luhansk unrecognized by the West, a small minority of eligible voters voted in favor of secession from Ukraine. Now, some Western politicians and analysts are wondering: If those people came out to vote for "independence," aren’t we obligated to consider their opinion when pondering the future of Ukraine? The Kremlin and…

  • Commentary posted May 21, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Three Keys to European Energy Independence from Russia

    Vladimir Putin is the father of the most significant energy mix shift in Europe. Ukraine may be the straw that broke the back of the energy camel. As a result, Russia is about to lose a lot of revenue. Talk about the unintended consequences. Even before Putin occupied the Crimea and supported separatist insurgency in Eastern Ukraine, the EU Commission began to seek ways…

  • Commentary posted May 11, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Use the Cold War playbook to keep Russia in line

    George Kennan was the State Department's top hand on Moscow. As the U.S.-Soviet alliance unraveled after World War II, no one seemed to understand the Kremlin better than Kennan. One of his most insightful observations was cautionary: Do not think about the standoff with the Soviet Union as principally a military confrontation. "[Y]ou didn't always have to occupy…

  • Commentary posted May 5, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Putin's Asymmetrical War on the West

    By any reasonable measure, Russia is getting the best of the West in the showdown over Ukraine. President Vladimir Putin's destabilization of that country continues apace while the United States and the Europeans are powerless to stop him, and all of this is happening despite the fact that by any reasonable measure Russia is weaker than the West. Its economy is much less…

  • Commentary posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Five Reasons Cold War II Isn't Happening

    At a press conference in the Hague, President Obama dismissed the suggestion that Mitt Romney had been right in 2012 to peg Moscow as America’s top strategic challenge. "The truth of the matter is that America's got a whole lot of challenges,” Mr. Obama said. “Russia is a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbors, not out of strength but out of…

  • Commentary posted March 27, 2014 by Luke Coffey After Crimea

    Not since the Cold War has Red Square hosted such an alarming spectacle. When Russian president Vladimir Putin gathered a crowd of thousands to celebrate his military annexation of Crimea last week, he demonstrated a now-familiar talent for merging stagecraft with statecraft. Flanked by four Jumbotrons and capped by the dubious proclamation “We are together,” Putin’s…

  • Commentary posted March 27, 2014 by Peter Brookes Will Putin’s bad-boy routine help Obama, Kerry see the light?

    If there’s one good thing to come out of the Crimea crisis so far – if that’s possible – it’s that Russia’s land-grab may have roused Team Obama from its strategic slumber about emerging big power threats. Startled by the Kremlin’s unexpected wake-up call, maybe now the White House will wipe away the “sleepies” and see the world as it is, rather than how Team Obama…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. A Cold War Lesson For Ukraine

    There's been a lot of talk about how Russia's invasion of Crimea means a return to the Cold War. History never repeats itself exactly (it merely echoes). But there are actually some lessons from the Cold War which could be applicable to the crisis in Ukraine. The first is that facts on the ground matter. The Soviet Union occupied half of Europe after World War II more or…

  • Commentary posted March 16, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. It's time to realize that Vladimir Putin can't be trusted

    Who killed Kennedy? The CIA. Who introduced AIDS to Africa? The CIA. Sure, it's crazy talk. But those stories were two of Moscow's most successful disinformation campaigns during the Cold War. And now Vladimir Putin is reviving these dirty tricks. That's the argument made in Disinformation: Former Spy Chief Reveals Secret Strategies for Undermining Freedom,…

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  • Commentary posted May 21, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Vladimir Putin's New Fifth International

    In the recent makeshift referenda in Donetsk and Luhansk unrecognized by the West, a small minority of eligible voters voted in favor of secession from Ukraine. Now, some Western politicians and analysts are wondering: If those people came out to vote for "independence," aren’t we obligated to consider their opinion when pondering the future of Ukraine? The Kremlin and…

  • Commentary posted March 16, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. It's time to realize that Vladimir Putin can't be trusted

    Who killed Kennedy? The CIA. Who introduced AIDS to Africa? The CIA. Sure, it's crazy talk. But those stories were two of Moscow's most successful disinformation campaigns during the Cold War. And now Vladimir Putin is reviving these dirty tricks. That's the argument made in Disinformation: Former Spy Chief Reveals Secret Strategies for Undermining Freedom,…

  • Commentary posted July 30, 2014 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. What’s at stake in Ukraine?

    What’s at stake in Ukraine? If the actions of Western governments speak louder than words, the short answer is “not much.” The full range of sanctions on Russia has not yet been imposed, and there is a widespread reluctance to embrace Ukraine too closely. But what if our reluctance is a mistake? We could end up undoing the entire post-Cold War order in Europe. It’s…

  • Commentary posted March 7, 2012 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Putin 4.0: Tough Times Ahead

    Last Sunday, Vladimir Putin won his fourth term as the ruler of Russia. (Count ineffectual Dmitri Medvedev's tenure as Putin's third term.) Today, decision makers and analysts are asking what the next six years will look like. A lot of Putin's preelection rhetoric harkened back the nineteenth-century nationalism and imperialism. But Russia's problems are…

  • Backgrounder posted October 21, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Why the U.S. Should Support Ukraine’s Association and Free Trade Agreements with Europe

    On August 17, 2013, the Kyiv-based website Ukraine Today published a document summarizing the Kremlin’s strategy on how to force Ukraine to join Russia’s sphere of influence.[1] The Russian strategy, which the Kremlin has not disavowed, is designed to pressure Ukraine into joining a Moscow-led Customs Union (which currently includes Belarus and Kazakhstan). The strategy…

  • WebMemo posted June 20, 2011 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Baker Spring, Michaela Dodge Reset Regret: Obama’s Cold War–Style Arms Control Undermines U.S.–Russian Relations

    In March 2009, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton presented her Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, with a red button symbolizing a new “reset” policy with the Russian Federation. Prophetically, and as a result of an incompetent translation, the letters on the button read “overload” instead of “reset.” The Obama Administration’s “reset” policy has been merely a list…

  • Commentary posted April 24, 2013 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. After Boston, Regard Vladimir Putin's Sympathy with Distrust

    Russian strongman Vladimir Putin expressed his sympathy for the victims of the Boston bombings last week. But make no mistake: Putin sees the bombings as an opportunity to rebuild relations with the United States on his terms. His crocodile tears shouldn't delude us into chasing a second "reset" in relations with Russia. After all, the first reset was one of the Obama…

  • Commentary posted March 28, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Five Reasons Cold War II Isn't Happening

    At a press conference in the Hague, President Obama dismissed the suggestion that Mitt Romney had been right in 2012 to peg Moscow as America’s top strategic challenge. "The truth of the matter is that America's got a whole lot of challenges,” Mr. Obama said. “Russia is a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbors, not out of strength but out of…

  • Commentary posted June 1, 2012 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Russia's Double-Headed Government

    Last week, the Russian capital played a great parlor game: who is in and who's out in the Putin presidential administration and Dmitri Medvedev's cabinet. More important for U.S. policy makers is understanding the contradictory nature of the new double-headed government Mr. Putin has created. By applying the Roman dictum "divide and rule," Putin has enhanced his…

  • Commentary posted May 11, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Use the Cold War playbook to keep Russia in line

    George Kennan was the State Department's top hand on Moscow. As the U.S.-Soviet alliance unraveled after World War II, no one seemed to understand the Kremlin better than Kennan. One of his most insightful observations was cautionary: Do not think about the standoff with the Soviet Union as principally a military confrontation. "[Y]ou didn't always have to occupy…

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  • Backgrounder posted October 21, 2013 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Why the U.S. Should Support Ukraine’s Association and Free Trade Agreements with Europe

    On August 17, 2013, the Kyiv-based website Ukraine Today published a document summarizing the Kremlin’s strategy on how to force Ukraine to join Russia’s sphere of influence.[1] The Russian strategy, which the Kremlin has not disavowed, is designed to pressure Ukraine into joining a Moscow-led Customs Union (which currently includes Belarus and Kazakhstan). The strategy…

  • Issue Brief posted April 25, 2012 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Promoting Human Rights in Russia Through the Sergei Magnitsky Act

    Protection of basic human rights, including the right to own property, is an important issue for those who hold American values close to heart. In Russia, human and property rights violations are undermining the state and preventing investment and business development. The poor state of the rule of law and pervasive corruption—including the failing court and law…

  • WebMemo posted June 20, 2011 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., Baker Spring, Michaela Dodge Reset Regret: Obama’s Cold War–Style Arms Control Undermines U.S.–Russian Relations

    In March 2009, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton presented her Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, with a red button symbolizing a new “reset” policy with the Russian Federation. Prophetically, and as a result of an incompetent translation, the letters on the button read “overload” instead of “reset.” The Obama Administration’s “reset” policy has been merely a list…

  • WebMemo posted June 15, 2011 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Reset Regret: U.S. Should Rethink Relations with Russian Leaders

    For the past two years, the Obama Administration has touted its Russia “reset policy” as one of its great diplomatic achievements. The President spent an inordinate amount of time cultivating Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and making him his principal diplomatic interlocutor—despite the fact that Medvedev is Prime Minister Vladimir Putin’s appointed protégé with no…

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Find more work on Prime Minister Vladimir Putin