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Taliban

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  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2012 by Lisa Curtis The U.S. Must Move Cautiously on Taliban Reconciliation

    Abstract: While President Obama is drawing down U.S. troops in Afghanistan, he is attempting to negotiate with the Taliban—despite the fact that the Taliban has renounced neither terrorism nor its support for al-Qaeda. If the Taliban is able to regain influence in Afghanistan without breaking ties with international terrorism, al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups could…

  • Backgrounder posted April 25, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Jessica Zuckerman Fifty Terror Plots Foiled Since 9/11: The Homegrown Threat and the Long War on Terrorism

    Abstract: In 2007, The Heritage Foundation became the first and only organization to track thwarted terrorist attacks against the United States. That year, Heritage reported that at least 19 publicly known terrorist attacks against the United States had been foiled since 9/11. Today, that number stands at 50. The fact that the United States has not suffered a large-scale…

  • Issue Brief posted March 1, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan: Costs of Accelerating Troop Withdrawal Too High

    The situation in Afghanistan has spiraled downward over the past 10 days, but before making hasty decisions on next steps in Afghanistan, U.S. policymakers need to consider what has contributed to this ominous turn of events and what options there are for adjusting the U.S. strategy to avoid further such incidents. U.S. policymakers should also be aware that leaving…

  • WebMemo posted May 17, 2011 by Lisa Curtis After bin Laden: Do Not Retreat from Afghanistan

    The killing of Osama bin Laden should strengthen U.S resolve to stabilize Afghanistan and ensure that it does not return to serving as a safe haven for terrorists intent on attacking the U.S. homeland. While the death of bin Laden marks a turning point in the fight against global terrorism, al-Qaeda and its affiliate organizations will not dissolve immediately. U.S.…

  • WebMemo posted May 11, 2011 by Sally McNamara, Morgan Lorraine Roach After bin Laden: NATO’s Resolve Against Terrorism Must Not Waver

    Earlier this month, U.S. military personnel dispatched one of the world’s most wanted terrorists and marked a significant victory in the war on terrorism. The death of Osama bin Laden was warmly welcomed by NATO leaders, including British Prime Minister David Cameron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen has rightly warned that…

  • Commentary posted May 4, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Finish off al Qaeda

    As the CIA and US Special Forces root through the files taken from Osama bin Laden's mansion, his terrorist teammates have to be asking what's next for them. Stateside, of course, hysterical pundits are warning darkly that al Qaeda's revenge can't be far off. More likely, though, the organization's operatives are heading for cover -- fearful of what intelligence…

  • Commentary posted May 2, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Bagging Bin Laden Doesn't the End Long War

    Bin Laden died in a mansion. Hitler died inside a bunker. Both bit the dust before the wars they started were finished. The Fuehrer shot himself on April 30, 1945. While Nazi Germany formally surrendered eight days later, the war against Japan went on for six more months, and the U.S. spent the next four decades dealing with the aftermath. Today, even with bin…

  • Backgrounder posted March 15, 2011 by Lisa Curtis, Sally McNamara Afghanistan: Time for Political Strategy to Capitalize on Military Gains

    Abstract: The U.S. faces difficult and ongoing challenges in Afghanistan. There have been setbacks, delays, and stumbling blocks in the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban, but now is not the time to begin large-scale troop withdrawals or to cut civilian aid programs. By deploying 30,000 additional troops last year, the U.S. has begun to achieve military gains,…

  • WebMemo posted December 17, 2010 by Lisa Curtis, James Phillips Afghan Review Shows Troop Surge Working

    The White House review on Afghanistan released Thursday demonstrates that the 30,000 additional U.S. troops deployed to Afghanistan this year are beginning to make a difference in the direction of the war. In order to build on these tentative gains, the Administration should take a stronger leadership role in driving political reconciliation inside Afghanistan,…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2010 by The Right Honorable Liam Fox, MP Afghanistan: Standing Shoulder to Shoulder with the United States

    Abstract: This is a time of testing in Afghanistan. The price being paid is high, the mission complex, and progress not always obvious to the eye. The truth is that operations in Afghanistan—operations for which the Afghans themselves are paying a heavy price along with NATO and other Coalition forces—are a direct consequence of the terrorist attacks of 9/11. To withdraw…

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  • Backgrounder posted April 25, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Jessica Zuckerman Fifty Terror Plots Foiled Since 9/11: The Homegrown Threat and the Long War on Terrorism

    Abstract: In 2007, The Heritage Foundation became the first and only organization to track thwarted terrorist attacks against the United States. That year, Heritage reported that at least 19 publicly known terrorist attacks against the United States had been foiled since 9/11. Today, that number stands at 50. The fact that the United States has not suffered a large-scale…

  • Lecture posted May 5, 2004 by The Honorable Frank J. Williams Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties in Wartime

    This month, several individuals detained as "enemy combatants" will make their appeals for freedom to the highest court in the land. Perhaps now, more than any other time in recent memory, the eyes of the world are intensely focused on the United States Supreme Court. In making their decisions, they must walk a fine line between protecting the civil liberties we all…

  • Backgrounder posted April 17, 2008 by James Phillips, Lisa Curtis The War in Afghanistan: More Help Needed

    As the spring snowmelt signals the onset of Afghan­istan's traditional fighting season, the United States has begun to deploy an additional 3,200 Marines to Afghanistan, raising the total U.S. force level to about 32,000.1 These reinforcements will help to blunt the expected spring offensive by the Taliban-led insur­gency, which has grown stronger in recent…

  • Backgrounder posted July 12, 2000 by James Phillips Defusing Terrorism at Ground Zero: Why a New U.S. Policy is Needed for Afghanistan

    When the United States helped the Afghan resistance defeat the Soviet Army in a brutal guerrilla war, it scored one of its biggest Cold War victories. However, shortly after Soviet troops withdrew from Afghanistan in 1989, the United States withdrew from active involvement in Afghan affairs. As a result, Washington squandered the residual influence that it had…

  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2012 by Lisa Curtis The U.S. Must Move Cautiously on Taliban Reconciliation

    Abstract: While President Obama is drawing down U.S. troops in Afghanistan, he is attempting to negotiate with the Taliban—despite the fact that the Taliban has renounced neither terrorism nor its support for al-Qaeda. If the Taliban is able to regain influence in Afghanistan without breaking ties with international terrorism, al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups could…

  • Commentary posted May 2, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Bagging Bin Laden Doesn't the End Long War

    Bin Laden died in a mansion. Hitler died inside a bunker. Both bit the dust before the wars they started were finished. The Fuehrer shot himself on April 30, 1945. While Nazi Germany formally surrendered eight days later, the war against Japan went on for six more months, and the U.S. spent the next four decades dealing with the aftermath. Today, even with bin…

  • Commentary posted May 4, 2011 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Finish off al Qaeda

    As the CIA and US Special Forces root through the files taken from Osama bin Laden's mansion, his terrorist teammates have to be asking what's next for them. Stateside, of course, hysterical pundits are warning darkly that al Qaeda's revenge can't be far off. More likely, though, the organization's operatives are heading for cover -- fearful of what intelligence…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2007 by Lisa Curtis, James Phillips Revitalizing U.S. Efforts in Afghanistan

    Afghanistan is a crucial front in the global struggle against the al-Qaeda terrorist network and Islamic radicalism. The United States-led coalition was unable to transform an overwhelming military victory in 2001 into a stable postwar political situation because of Afghanistan's fractious politics and shattered economic, state, and civil society infrastructures; a…

  • Backgrounder posted March 15, 2011 by Lisa Curtis, Sally McNamara Afghanistan: Time for Political Strategy to Capitalize on Military Gains

    Abstract: The U.S. faces difficult and ongoing challenges in Afghanistan. There have been setbacks, delays, and stumbling blocks in the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban, but now is not the time to begin large-scale troop withdrawals or to cut civilian aid programs. By deploying 30,000 additional troops last year, the U.S. has begun to achieve military gains,…

  • WebMemo posted September 26, 2006 by James Phillips Bin Ladenism Lives, and So Probably Does Bin Laden

    On September 23, the French newspaper l’Est Republicain reported, based on a leaked memo from France’s DSGE intelligence agency, that Saudi intelligence had uncovered information that Osama bin Laden had died of typhoid on August 23 in Pakistan. But a French security official quickly cautioned that the report is based on a single source, and a Saudi intelligence source…

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  • Backgrounder posted April 26, 2012 by Lisa Curtis The U.S. Must Move Cautiously on Taliban Reconciliation

    Abstract: While President Obama is drawing down U.S. troops in Afghanistan, he is attempting to negotiate with the Taliban—despite the fact that the Taliban has renounced neither terrorism nor its support for al-Qaeda. If the Taliban is able to regain influence in Afghanistan without breaking ties with international terrorism, al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups could…

  • Backgrounder posted April 25, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D., Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Jessica Zuckerman Fifty Terror Plots Foiled Since 9/11: The Homegrown Threat and the Long War on Terrorism

    Abstract: In 2007, The Heritage Foundation became the first and only organization to track thwarted terrorist attacks against the United States. That year, Heritage reported that at least 19 publicly known terrorist attacks against the United States had been foiled since 9/11. Today, that number stands at 50. The fact that the United States has not suffered a large-scale…

  • Issue Brief posted March 1, 2012 by Lisa Curtis U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan: Costs of Accelerating Troop Withdrawal Too High

    The situation in Afghanistan has spiraled downward over the past 10 days, but before making hasty decisions on next steps in Afghanistan, U.S. policymakers need to consider what has contributed to this ominous turn of events and what options there are for adjusting the U.S. strategy to avoid further such incidents. U.S. policymakers should also be aware that leaving…

  • WebMemo posted May 17, 2011 by Lisa Curtis After bin Laden: Do Not Retreat from Afghanistan

    The killing of Osama bin Laden should strengthen U.S resolve to stabilize Afghanistan and ensure that it does not return to serving as a safe haven for terrorists intent on attacking the U.S. homeland. While the death of bin Laden marks a turning point in the fight against global terrorism, al-Qaeda and its affiliate organizations will not dissolve immediately. U.S.…

  • WebMemo posted May 11, 2011 by Sally McNamara, Morgan Lorraine Roach After bin Laden: NATO’s Resolve Against Terrorism Must Not Waver

    Earlier this month, U.S. military personnel dispatched one of the world’s most wanted terrorists and marked a significant victory in the war on terrorism. The death of Osama bin Laden was warmly welcomed by NATO leaders, including British Prime Minister David Cameron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen has rightly warned that…

  • Backgrounder posted March 15, 2011 by Lisa Curtis, Sally McNamara Afghanistan: Time for Political Strategy to Capitalize on Military Gains

    Abstract: The U.S. faces difficult and ongoing challenges in Afghanistan. There have been setbacks, delays, and stumbling blocks in the fight against al-Qaeda and the Taliban, but now is not the time to begin large-scale troop withdrawals or to cut civilian aid programs. By deploying 30,000 additional troops last year, the U.S. has begun to achieve military gains,…

  • WebMemo posted December 17, 2010 by Lisa Curtis, James Phillips Afghan Review Shows Troop Surge Working

    The White House review on Afghanistan released Thursday demonstrates that the 30,000 additional U.S. troops deployed to Afghanistan this year are beginning to make a difference in the direction of the war. In order to build on these tentative gains, the Administration should take a stronger leadership role in driving political reconciliation inside Afghanistan,…

  • Lecture posted July 7, 2010 by The Right Honorable Liam Fox, MP Afghanistan: Standing Shoulder to Shoulder with the United States

    Abstract: This is a time of testing in Afghanistan. The price being paid is high, the mission complex, and progress not always obvious to the eye. The truth is that operations in Afghanistan—operations for which the Afghans themselves are paying a heavy price along with NATO and other Coalition forces—are a direct consequence of the terrorist attacks of 9/11. To withdraw…

  • Backgrounder posted April 17, 2008 by James Phillips, Lisa Curtis The War in Afghanistan: More Help Needed

    As the spring snowmelt signals the onset of Afghan­istan's traditional fighting season, the United States has begun to deploy an additional 3,200 Marines to Afghanistan, raising the total U.S. force level to about 32,000.1 These reinforcements will help to blunt the expected spring offensive by the Taliban-led insur­gency, which has grown stronger in recent…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2007 by Lisa Curtis, James Phillips Revitalizing U.S. Efforts in Afghanistan

    Afghanistan is a crucial front in the global struggle against the al-Qaeda terrorist network and Islamic radicalism. The United States-led coalition was unable to transform an overwhelming military victory in 2001 into a stable postwar political situation because of Afghanistan's fractious politics and shattered economic, state, and civil society infrastructures; a…

Find more work on Taliban
Find more work on Taliban