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United States Government

Our Research & Offerings on United States Government
  • Lecture on February 13, 2014 The Prospect for Freedom: Can the U.S. Sustain Its Experiment in Self-Government?

    Some years ago, I was in China at one of the major universities and speaking to a forum of Chinese CEOs. After the final banquet, I walked back to the lecture hall with the dean of the business school. “Let me ask you a question I wouldn’t ask in public,” he said. “What am I missing? We in China are fascinated with the Christian roots of your Western past—for the sake of…

  • Legal Memorandum posted February 12, 2014 by Elizabeth Slattery, Andrew Kloster An Executive Unbound: The Obama Administration’s Unilateral Actions

    “We can’t wait for an increasingly dysfunctional Congress to do its job. Where they won’t act, I will.” —President Barack Obama[1] The rule of law is a bedrock principle of Anglo–American jurisprudence. It stands for the belief that all—including government officials—are subject to the law and not above it. America’s Founding Fathers understood this principle, and the…

  • Commentary posted February 3, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Why the people don’t trust government

    No one tests the historic optimism of the American people quite like your average politician. Poll after poll finds a deep distrust of government, with more than two-thirds saying they can’t believe what they hear from Washington. You don’t have to look far for examples of why they feel this way. Americans have learned to be wary of taking what politicians say at face…

  • Legal Memorandum posted January 23, 2014 by Andrew M. Grossman Harris v. Quinn: An End to the Forced Unionization of Home-Care Workers?

    On January 21, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in Harris v. Quinn, a challenge to states' authority to require that home-based workers submit to an exclusive representative for collective bargaining—i.e., a labor union. Organizing home-based workers has been among the labor movement's greatest prospects for adding to its diminishing ranks,…

  • Lecture posted January 7, 2014 by Mike Lee Defending the Senate’s Constitutional Duty to Advise and Consent to Presidential Appointments

    I’m very grateful for the opportunity to speak about the Recess Appointments Clause today. In the small town of Alpine, Utah, where I live, we speak of little else. It is of great interest to those of us who watch the Supreme Court to see this case get teed up. I was very happy, of course, when the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari to review this…

  • Commentary posted October 23, 2013 by James L. Gattuso Congressional checks and balances aren’t in the mail

    Spare change is hard to find at the U.S. Postal Service nowadays. The nation's mail service started October by defaulting on a payment due to the U.S. Treasury and is down to less than 10 days of cash on hand. The USPS is expected to muddle through the crunch, but its financial problems won’t go away. The mail delivery business is in long-term decline. Without…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 9, 2013 by Michael Stern The Supreme Court Considers the President’s Power to Make Recess Appointments

    In its new term, the Supreme Court of the United States will consider National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning, a challenge to President Barack Obama’s January 4, 2012, recess appointments to fill three National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) vacancies. At the time of these appointments, every three days, the Senate was conducting pro forma sessions during which no…

  • Commentary posted September 4, 2013 by Hans A. von Spakovsky Amendments for Liberty

    Mark Levin’s new book (The Liberty Amendments: Restoring the American Republic, published by Simon & Schuster) should be required reading for conservative bloggers, reporters, radio talk-show hosts, state legislators, members of Congress, and grassroots activists all over America. It provides a coherent plan to restore our constitutional republic, reversing the damage…

  • Lecture posted June 25, 2013 by Joseph Postell, Ph.D., Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Todd F. Gaziano How to Limit Government in the Age of Obama

    The Role of Congress Joseph Postell, PhD: Limiting government in the age of Obama is a tall order, but it is a tall order not simply because of who occupies the White House. It is a tall order because it requires limiting government in the age of the administrative state, which stacks the deck against those hoping to place limits on government. To mount an effective…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Lecture posted March 14, 2013 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Confronting Washington's Administrative State: A Renewed Role for the States

    While the Constitution continues to be read, and its principles known, the States must, by every rational man, be considered as essential component parts of the Union; and therefore the idea of sacrificing the former to the latter is totally inadmissible. —Alexander Hamilton, 1788 [1] Federalism is rooted in the knowledge that our political liberties are best assured by…

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  • Backgrounder posted February 5, 2013 by Jason Richwine, Ph.D. Nine Fallacies Used to Defend Public-Sector Pensions

    The generosity of retirement benefits for government employees has become a major political issue, as policymakers at all levels of government struggle with budget deficits in the midst of a weak economy. Government employees do enjoy retirement benefits that are often several times greater than the retirement benefits of comparable private-sector workers.[1] This…

  • Legal Memorandum posted January 23, 2014 by Andrew M. Grossman Harris v. Quinn: An End to the Forced Unionization of Home-Care Workers?

    On January 21, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in Harris v. Quinn, a challenge to states' authority to require that home-based workers submit to an exclusive representative for collective bargaining—i.e., a labor union. Organizing home-based workers has been among the labor movement's greatest prospects for adding to its diminishing ranks,…

  • Issue Brief posted January 18, 2013 by James M. Roberts, Ray Walser, Ph.D. The Hagel, Kerry, and Brennan Senate Confirmation Hearings: U.S. Policy for the Western Hemisphere

    The United States Senate will soon begin the confirmation process for three key Administration positions: Senator John Kerry (D–MA) for Secretary of State, former Senator Chuck Hagel (R–NE) for Secretary of Defense, and White House Chief Counterterrorism Advisor John Brennan for Director of the CIA. Each must defend his qualifications for higher office and present a…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 9, 2013 by Michael Stern The Supreme Court Considers the President’s Power to Make Recess Appointments

    In its new term, the Supreme Court of the United States will consider National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning, a challenge to President Barack Obama’s January 4, 2012, recess appointments to fill three National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) vacancies. At the time of these appointments, every three days, the Senate was conducting pro forma sessions during which no…

  • Backgrounder posted June 4, 2012 by Brian Darling Tyranny in the United States Senate

    Abstract: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has regularly used a procedural tactic called “filling the amendment tree” to restrict Senators’ right to debate and offer amendments. While previous Majority Leaders have occasionally used this tactic, Senator Reid has used this tactic often—more than all of his predecessors combined. This tactic combined with another…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Lecture posted by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Why Congress Must Confront the Administrative State

    Abstract: The triumph of the administrative state has been made possible by the emasculation of the legislative power. Washington’s problem is not merely federal spending and debt; it is the arrogance of centralized power. The time is therefore ripe for a major national discussion not only about the size of government, but also about the processes of government. Americans…

  • Issue Brief posted December 27, 2012 by Diane Katz, James L. Gattuso The 10 Worst Regulations of 2012

    During 2012, virtually every aspect of American life, from caloric intake to dishwasher efficiency, was subjected to government meddling. Most of these rules increase the cost of living, others hinder job creation, and many erode freedom. Not all regulations are unwarranted, of course, but increasingly, the rules imposed by the government have less to do with health and…

  • Lecture posted June 25, 2013 by Joseph Postell, Ph.D., Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Todd F. Gaziano How to Limit Government in the Age of Obama

    The Role of Congress Joseph Postell, PhD: Limiting government in the age of Obama is a tall order, but it is a tall order not simply because of who occupies the White House. It is a tall order because it requires limiting government in the age of the administrative state, which stacks the deck against those hoping to place limits on government. To mount an effective…

  • Lecture on February 13, 2014 The Prospect for Freedom: Can the U.S. Sustain Its Experiment in Self-Government?

    Some years ago, I was in China at one of the major universities and speaking to a forum of Chinese CEOs. After the final banquet, I walked back to the lecture hall with the dean of the business school. “Let me ask you a question I wouldn’t ask in public,” he said. “What am I missing? We in China are fascinated with the Christian roots of your Western past—for the sake of…

  • Issue Brief posted November 13, 2012 by Paul Rosenzweig The Alarming Trend of Cybersecurity Breaches and Failures in the U.S. Government Continues

    This summer, the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 (CSA) failed to pass the Senate, with Democrats and Republicans alike voting against the bill. The overriding concern was that the regulatory approach of the bill would be ineffective at best and harmful at worst. Following the failure of the CSA, the Obama Administration began drafting a cybersecurity executive order that…

Find more work on United States Government
  • Lecture on February 13, 2014 The Prospect for Freedom: Can the U.S. Sustain Its Experiment in Self-Government?

    Some years ago, I was in China at one of the major universities and speaking to a forum of Chinese CEOs. After the final banquet, I walked back to the lecture hall with the dean of the business school. “Let me ask you a question I wouldn’t ask in public,” he said. “What am I missing? We in China are fascinated with the Christian roots of your Western past—for the sake of…

  • Legal Memorandum posted February 12, 2014 by Elizabeth Slattery, Andrew Kloster An Executive Unbound: The Obama Administration’s Unilateral Actions

    “We can’t wait for an increasingly dysfunctional Congress to do its job. Where they won’t act, I will.” —President Barack Obama[1] The rule of law is a bedrock principle of Anglo–American jurisprudence. It stands for the belief that all—including government officials—are subject to the law and not above it. America’s Founding Fathers understood this principle, and the…

  • Legal Memorandum posted January 23, 2014 by Andrew M. Grossman Harris v. Quinn: An End to the Forced Unionization of Home-Care Workers?

    On January 21, 2014, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral argument in Harris v. Quinn, a challenge to states' authority to require that home-based workers submit to an exclusive representative for collective bargaining—i.e., a labor union. Organizing home-based workers has been among the labor movement's greatest prospects for adding to its diminishing ranks,…

  • Lecture posted January 7, 2014 by Mike Lee Defending the Senate’s Constitutional Duty to Advise and Consent to Presidential Appointments

    I’m very grateful for the opportunity to speak about the Recess Appointments Clause today. In the small town of Alpine, Utah, where I live, we speak of little else. It is of great interest to those of us who watch the Supreme Court to see this case get teed up. I was very happy, of course, when the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari to review this…

  • Legal Memorandum posted October 9, 2013 by Michael Stern The Supreme Court Considers the President’s Power to Make Recess Appointments

    In its new term, the Supreme Court of the United States will consider National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning, a challenge to President Barack Obama’s January 4, 2012, recess appointments to fill three National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) vacancies. At the time of these appointments, every three days, the Senate was conducting pro forma sessions during which no…

  • Lecture posted June 25, 2013 by Joseph Postell, Ph.D., Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Todd F. Gaziano How to Limit Government in the Age of Obama

    The Role of Congress Joseph Postell, PhD: Limiting government in the age of Obama is a tall order, but it is a tall order not simply because of who occupies the White House. It is a tall order because it requires limiting government in the age of the administrative state, which stacks the deck against those hoping to place limits on government. To mount an effective…

  • Center for Policy Innovation Lecture posted March 14, 2013 by Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D. Confronting Washington's Administrative State: A Renewed Role for the States

    While the Constitution continues to be read, and its principles known, the States must, by every rational man, be considered as essential component parts of the Union; and therefore the idea of sacrificing the former to the latter is totally inadmissible. —Alexander Hamilton, 1788 [1] Federalism is rooted in the knowledge that our political liberties are best assured by…

  • Backgrounder posted February 5, 2013 by Jason Richwine, Ph.D. Nine Fallacies Used to Defend Public-Sector Pensions

    The generosity of retirement benefits for government employees has become a major political issue, as policymakers at all levels of government struggle with budget deficits in the midst of a weak economy. Government employees do enjoy retirement benefits that are often several times greater than the retirement benefits of comparable private-sector workers.[1] This…

  • Issue Brief posted January 30, 2013 by James L. Gattuso The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Its Non-Director: What Now?

    It may be back to the beginning for the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The agency, under the direction of Richard Cordray, had just built up a full head of steam, releasing some 16 regulations in the past year. But a court decision on January 25 may not only stop this train, but send it back to the station. Such a reversal would be good news for…

  • Issue Brief posted January 28, 2013 by Derek Scissors, Ph.D. A Better Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States

    According to The Heritage Foundation’s China Global Investment Tracker, Chinese non-bond investment in the U.S. set a record in 2012.[1] China has $3.3 trillion in foreign reserves and, like other fast-growing economies, wants to invest more here. Foreign investment and other commerce benefits America, but there are understandable concerns about the loss of advanced…

Find more work on United States Government
Find more work on United States Government