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United Nations Commission on Human Rights

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  • Backgrounder posted January 12, 2016 by Olivia Enos, Bruce Klingner Next Steps for Human Rights in North Korea

    After the release of the report of the United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights in North Korea (COI) in February 2014, the world can no longer deny the severity of Pyongyang’s human rights crisis. The horrific tales of abuse and sheer magnitude of “systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights” led the U.N. to conclude that North Korea was guilty…

  • Posted on April 25, 2014 by Grace Melton “Sexual Rights” Dominate U.N. Sustainable Development Negotiations

    The recent meetings of the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) and the Commission on Population and Development...…

  • Posted on August 21, 2013 by Olivia Enos North Korea’s Crimes Against Humanity

    The United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights abuses in North Korea began taking testimony from defectors in...…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • Posted on April 12, 2012 by Steven Groves The U.N. vs. George Zimmerman: Is this What "International Justice" Would Look Like?

    One would think that Harvard Law School-educated Navanethem “Navi” Pillay, a South African jurist and current United...…

  • Backgrounder posted June 23, 2011 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.S. Should Pursue an Alternative to the U.N. Human Rights Council

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council has failed to consistently fulfill its mandate to hold governments accountable for violating basic human rights and fundamental freedoms and to promote and protect human rights. Two years of U.S. membership on and engagement with the council have not significantly improved its performance. Rather than continuing to expend finite…

  • WebMemo posted August 26, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves The U.S. Universal Periodic Review: Flawed from the Start

    The United States recently released its report to the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC). This report will serve as the basis of the U.S.’s first examination under that body’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR).[1] Although the U.S. report gives undue attention and credit to the actions of the Obama Administration, it is largely a factual presentation of current U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 2, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer Elections for U.N. Human Rights Council Underscore the Need for Reform

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council’s record over its first four years is gravely disappointing. Contrary to claims made by the Obama Administration, U.S. membership on the council has not appreciably improved its performance. However, the council can now claim added legitimacy for its decisions and resolutions because of U.S. support and membership. The…

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  • Backgrounder posted January 12, 2016 by Olivia Enos, Bruce Klingner Next Steps for Human Rights in North Korea

    After the release of the report of the United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights in North Korea (COI) in February 2014, the world can no longer deny the severity of Pyongyang’s human rights crisis. The horrific tales of abuse and sheer magnitude of “systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights” led the U.N. to conclude that North Korea was guilty…

  • Backgrounder posted June 23, 2011 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.S. Should Pursue an Alternative to the U.N. Human Rights Council

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council has failed to consistently fulfill its mandate to hold governments accountable for violating basic human rights and fundamental freedoms and to promote and protect human rights. Two years of U.S. membership on and engagement with the council have not significantly improved its performance. Rather than continuing to expend finite…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • WebMemo posted August 26, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves The U.S. Universal Periodic Review: Flawed from the Start

    The United States recently released its report to the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC). This report will serve as the basis of the U.S.’s first examination under that body’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR).[1] Although the U.S. report gives undue attention and credit to the actions of the Obama Administration, it is largely a factual presentation of current U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 2, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer Elections for U.N. Human Rights Council Underscore the Need for Reform

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council’s record over its first four years is gravely disappointing. Contrary to claims made by the Obama Administration, U.S. membership on the council has not appreciably improved its performance. However, the council can now claim added legitimacy for its decisions and resolutions because of U.S. support and membership. The…

Find more work on United Nations Commission on Human Rights
  • Backgrounder posted January 12, 2016 by Olivia Enos, Bruce Klingner Next Steps for Human Rights in North Korea

    After the release of the report of the United Nations commission of inquiry on human rights in North Korea (COI) in February 2014, the world can no longer deny the severity of Pyongyang’s human rights crisis. The horrific tales of abuse and sheer magnitude of “systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights” led the U.N. to conclude that North Korea was guilty…

  • Issue Brief posted September 5, 2012 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.N. Human Rights Council Does Not Deserve U.S. Support

    The African Union’s decision to nominate Sudan for the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC) elicited justifiable outrage. Pressure from human rights groups and governments led Kenya to announce its own election bid, causing Sudan to withdraw. This was a welcome development; the notion of the genocidal government sitting on the most visible U.N. human rights body was…

  • Backgrounder posted June 23, 2011 by Brett D. Schaefer The U.S. Should Pursue an Alternative to the U.N. Human Rights Council

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council has failed to consistently fulfill its mandate to hold governments accountable for violating basic human rights and fundamental freedoms and to promote and protect human rights. Two years of U.S. membership on and engagement with the council have not significantly improved its performance. Rather than continuing to expend finite…

  • WebMemo posted August 26, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer, Steven Groves The U.S. Universal Periodic Review: Flawed from the Start

    The United States recently released its report to the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC). This report will serve as the basis of the U.S.’s first examination under that body’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR).[1] Although the U.S. report gives undue attention and credit to the actions of the Obama Administration, it is largely a factual presentation of current U.S.…

  • Backgrounder posted June 2, 2010 by Brett D. Schaefer Elections for U.N. Human Rights Council Underscore the Need for Reform

    Abstract: The U.N. Human Rights Council’s record over its first four years is gravely disappointing. Contrary to claims made by the Obama Administration, U.S. membership on the council has not appreciably improved its performance. However, the council can now claim added legitimacy for its decisions and resolutions because of U.S. support and membership. The…

Find more work on United Nations Commission on Human Rights
Find more work on United Nations Commission on Human Rights