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  • Backgrounder posted April 14, 2016 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Memo to a New President: How Best to Organize the National Security Council

    Ever since its creation in 1947, the National Security Council has been the chief vehicle for coordinating national security advice for the President of the United States.[1] Over the years, Presidents have experimented with different NSC structures and organizations with varying degrees of success. They have tried strong advisors and weak ones. They have had small staffs…

  • Special Report posted April 7, 2016 by Steven Groves A Manual Adapting the Law of Armed Conflict to Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems

    On April 11, 2016, the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) will hold a week-long meeting on lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) in Geneva.[1] Previous meetings were held in 2014 and 2015 to discuss the legality of LAWS under the law of armed conflict (LOAC) and international human rights law.[2] Some nations that attended these meetings, as well as all…

  • Backgrounder posted September 29, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Daniel Kochis The Baltic States: The United States Must Be Prepared to Fulfill Its NATO Treaty Obligations

    U.S. interest in the Baltic states derives primarily from its treaty obligations in the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty and membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Article V of the North Atlantic Treaty states that an attack on one is an attack on all. This means that the U.S. is committed to the security of the Baltic cities of Tallinn, Riga, and Vilnius…

  • Issue Brief posted April 16, 2015 by Steven Groves U.N. Conference Debating a Ban on Autonomous Weapons: Understanding Key Issues

    This week, a ban on lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS) is being debated at the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) in Geneva. The U.S. delegation has been non-committal on such a ban, and U.S. policy currently permits the Department of Defense (DOD) to pursue the development of LAWS in a responsible manner. At the conference, the United States should…

  • Backgrounder posted March 5, 2015 by Steven Groves The U.S. Should Oppose the U.N.’s Attempt to Ban Autonomous Weapons

    As many as 40 nations are currently developing military robotics.[1] Indeed, some weapons already in use may be considered “autonomous” (or may be easily modified to be autonomous). These include Raytheon’s Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS), a “rapid-fire, computer-controlled, radar-guided gun system” designed to destroy incoming anti-ship missiles;[2] Israel…

  • Issue Brief posted September 22, 2014 by Brett D. Schaefer A U.S. Agenda for the 69th Session of the U.N. General Assembly

    The 69th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) officially opened on September 16. The early part of the UNGA session, generally highlighted by a high-level summit and the theatrics of the General Debate featuring speeches by most of the world’s leaders, garners a great deal of media attention that quickly falters once the real grind of the session begins.…

  • Posted on April 14, 2014 by Charlotte Florance / Brett Schaefer Is a U.N. Mission to the Central African Republic the Answer?

    The United Nations Security Council on April 10 authorized a U.N. peacekeeping operation for the Central African...…

  • Backgrounder posted November 4, 2013 by Bruce Klingner Time to Get North Korean Sanctions Right

    Responding to North Korea’s third nuclear test in 2013, President Barack Obama declared that North Korea’s nuclear weapons program was a “threat to the U.S. national security and to international peace and security.”[1] The U.N. Security Council similarly warned that North Korea’s nuclear and missile threats posed “a clear threat to international peace and security.”[2]…

  • Issue Brief posted October 18, 2013 by James Phillips U.S. Should Maximize Pressure on Iran at Nuclear Talks

    The Geneva talks have once again raised hopes for a breakthrough in the long-stalled nuclear negotiations with Iran. Western diplomats have expressed “cautious optimism” about the prospects for success after two days of talks. But Iran has not budged from its defiance of key elements of multiple U.N. Security Council resolutions; it has merely adopted a softer and more…

  • Posted on October 3, 2013 by Helle Dale Iran Leader in Sheep’s Clothing

    It fell to the last speaker at the United Nations yesterday, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, to warn the...…

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  • Backgrounder posted April 14, 2016 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Memo to a New President: How Best to Organize the National Security Council

    Ever since its creation in 1947, the National Security Council has been the chief vehicle for coordinating national security advice for the President of the United States.[1] Over the years, Presidents have experimented with different NSC structures and organizations with varying degrees of success. They have tried strong advisors and weak ones. They have had small staffs…

  • WebMemo posted March 22, 2010 by Helle C. Dale Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communications Review: Key Issues for Congressional Oversight

    How the U.S. government communicates with the world—explaining policies, presenting facts about American life and values, promoting the national interest by helping foreign audiences understand America—is a matter of no small importance. During the Cold War, for example, engagement in the war of ideas through the United States Information Agency was a critical…

Find more work on National Security Council
  • Backgrounder posted April 14, 2016 by Kim R. Holmes, Ph.D. Memo to a New President: How Best to Organize the National Security Council

    Ever since its creation in 1947, the National Security Council has been the chief vehicle for coordinating national security advice for the President of the United States.[1] Over the years, Presidents have experimented with different NSC structures and organizations with varying degrees of success. They have tried strong advisors and weak ones. They have had small staffs…

  • WebMemo posted March 22, 2010 by Helle C. Dale Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communications Review: Key Issues for Congressional Oversight

    How the U.S. government communicates with the world—explaining policies, presenting facts about American life and values, promoting the national interest by helping foreign audiences understand America—is a matter of no small importance. During the Cold War, for example, engagement in the war of ideas through the United States Information Agency was a critical…

Find more work on National Security Council
Find more work on National Security Council