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  • Backgrounder posted December 17, 2014 by James L. Gattuso, Michael Sargent Eight Myths About FCC Regulation of the Internet

    Few policy debates in Washington have generated as many myths and mischaracterizations as the ongoing battle over proposed Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules for broadband Internet service. Popularly known as “net neutrality” rules, these Internet regulations would limit the ability of Internet service providers (ISPs) such as AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast to…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2014 by James L. Gattuso Obama and the FCC: Bully Pulpit, Bad Policy

    Like Theodore Roosevelt, Barack Obama knows that the presidency makes an effective bully pulpit — even when you have historically low approval ratings. He showed that earlier this month when — in an unusually deep wade into the decision-making process at the supposedly independent Federal Communications Commission — the president came out four-square in favor of imposing…

  • Backgrounder posted November 25, 2014 by James L. Gattuso, Michael Sargent Beyond Hypothetical: How FCC Internet Regulation Would Hurt Consumers

    On November 10, President Barack Obama joined a long-simmering debate at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), urging the agency to adopt comprehensive government regulation of Internet service providers, such as Verizon and Comcast. These regulations would require companies that provide Internet access to end users (households and businesses) to process all…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A Backdoor Tax on the Internet

    Ready to pay more for Internet access? Me neither. Unfortunately, that’s exactly what we can expect under the “net neutrality” rules being pushed by President Obama. “Net neutrality” may sound harmless, but there would be nothing neutral about this change. Currently, broadband providers such as Verizon, AT&T and Comcast are treated differently than traditional telephone…

  • Commentary posted November 17, 2014 by Diane Katz, James L. Gattuso Obama's Final Two Years: A Sprint on Regulation?

    The election results were a crushing political blow for the Obama administration, giving Republicans firm control of both houses of Congress for the final two years of his term. But this in no way signals the end of the president's policy agenda. It simply shifts the action to regulatory agencies. In the days since the vote, this has already begun. Obama is moving…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2014 by James L. Gattuso Will FCC rules crash the Internet?

    The comment period on the FCC’s latest plan to regulate Internet traffic through so-called “net neutrality” rules was slated to end last Tuesday. But the agency had to extend the deadline. Because its website crashed. The irony was hard to miss. The agency has been beating the drum for Internet regulation for nearly a decade. The Federal Communications Commission has…

  • Commentary posted March 13, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez Do You Like to Be Nudged?

    Do you want society’s so-called best and brightest “nudging” your decisions about what to consume – whether it’s for news, soft drinks or light bulbs? If so, chances are you call yourself progressive. If you snort at the mere notion, however, you are almost certainly a conservative. In fact, throw out all the other Rorschach tests. This is the one that separates one…

  • Backgrounder posted November 6, 2012 by James L. Gattuso Adjusting the Picture: Television Regulation for the 21st Century

    Abstract: Television broadcasting, long subject to uniquely comprehensive regulation, has become economically “normal,” characterized today by competition and innovation. The industry however, is seeing growing conflicts between traditional broadcasters and the newer cable and satellite providers over retransmission rights. Some have urged the FCC to take a more…

  • WebMemo posted May 13, 2011 by James L. Gattuso AT&T and T-Mobile: Good Deal, Bad Process

    The battle over AT&T’s proposed acquisition of struggling wireless carrier T-Mobile officially began last month when AT&T filed papers with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requesting approval. The deal seems to be a sensible one, potentially benefiting T-Mobile’s and AT&T’s subscribers.[1] Not so sensible, however, is the process regulators will…

  • WebMemo posted March 7, 2011 by James L. Gattuso Net Neutrality: Time for Congress to Act

    Should the FCC be allowed to regulate the Internet? That’s the question facing Congress as it reviews the “net neutrality” rule recently adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The House Commerce Committee is expected to vote soon on a “resolution of disapproval” to void the regulation. Even if such a resolution is not ultimately adopted—presidential…

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  • Backgrounder posted November 6, 2012 by James L. Gattuso Adjusting the Picture: Television Regulation for the 21st Century

    Abstract: Television broadcasting, long subject to uniquely comprehensive regulation, has become economically “normal,” characterized today by competition and innovation. The industry however, is seeing growing conflicts between traditional broadcasters and the newer cable and satellite providers over retransmission rights. Some have urged the FCC to take a more…

  • Commentary posted July 23, 2014 by James L. Gattuso Will FCC rules crash the Internet?

    The comment period on the FCC’s latest plan to regulate Internet traffic through so-called “net neutrality” rules was slated to end last Tuesday. But the agency had to extend the deadline. Because its website crashed. The irony was hard to miss. The agency has been beating the drum for Internet regulation for nearly a decade. The Federal Communications Commission has…

  • Commentary posted November 25, 2014 by James L. Gattuso Obama and the FCC: Bully Pulpit, Bad Policy

    Like Theodore Roosevelt, Barack Obama knows that the presidency makes an effective bully pulpit — even when you have historically low approval ratings. He showed that earlier this month when — in an unusually deep wade into the decision-making process at the supposedly independent Federal Communications Commission — the president came out four-square in favor of imposing…

  • WebMemo posted March 7, 2011 by James L. Gattuso Net Neutrality: Time for Congress to Act

    Should the FCC be allowed to regulate the Internet? That’s the question facing Congress as it reviews the “net neutrality” rule recently adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The House Commerce Committee is expected to vote soon on a “resolution of disapproval” to void the regulation. Even if such a resolution is not ultimately adopted—presidential…

  • Commentary posted November 21, 2014 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. A Backdoor Tax on the Internet

    Ready to pay more for Internet access? Me neither. Unfortunately, that’s exactly what we can expect under the “net neutrality” rules being pushed by President Obama. “Net neutrality” may sound harmless, but there would be nothing neutral about this change. Currently, broadband providers such as Verizon, AT&T and Comcast are treated differently than traditional telephone…

  • Commentary posted November 17, 2014 by Diane Katz, James L. Gattuso Obama's Final Two Years: A Sprint on Regulation?

    The election results were a crushing political blow for the Obama administration, giving Republicans firm control of both houses of Congress for the final two years of his term. But this in no way signals the end of the president's policy agenda. It simply shifts the action to regulatory agencies. In the days since the vote, this has already begun. Obama is moving…

  • Backgrounder posted November 25, 2014 by James L. Gattuso, Michael Sargent Beyond Hypothetical: How FCC Internet Regulation Would Hurt Consumers

    On November 10, President Barack Obama joined a long-simmering debate at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), urging the agency to adopt comprehensive government regulation of Internet service providers, such as Verizon and Comcast. These regulations would require companies that provide Internet access to end users (households and businesses) to process all…

  • Backgrounder posted May 6, 2008 by James L. Gattuso The FCC's Cross-Ownership Rule: Turning the Page on Media

    Should radio and television stations be allowed to own newspapers? Last December, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) answered "sometimes." Specifically, the five-member agency voted to liberalize its 33-year-old blanket prohibition on cross-ownership, allowing broadcast licenses to be owned jointly with newspaper licensees. The decision is now being challenged…

  • Commentary posted March 13, 2014 by Mike Gonzalez Do You Like to Be Nudged?

    Do you want society’s so-called best and brightest “nudging” your decisions about what to consume – whether it’s for news, soft drinks or light bulbs? If so, chances are you call yourself progressive. If you snort at the mere notion, however, you are almost certainly a conservative. In fact, throw out all the other Rorschach tests. This is the one that separates one…

  • WebMemo posted December 17, 2010 by James L. Gattuso Red Tape Under the Tree: FCC Plans Internet Regulation for Christmas

    We have two branches of government—Congress and the courts—expressing grave concerns with our agency becoming increasingly unmoored from our statutory authority. By seeking to regulate the Internet now, we exceed the authority Congress has given us, and justify those concerns. —FCC Commissioner Meredith Atwell Baker[1] Should regulators in Washington, D.C., set…

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  • Backgrounder posted December 17, 2014 by James L. Gattuso, Michael Sargent Eight Myths About FCC Regulation of the Internet

    Few policy debates in Washington have generated as many myths and mischaracterizations as the ongoing battle over proposed Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules for broadband Internet service. Popularly known as “net neutrality” rules, these Internet regulations would limit the ability of Internet service providers (ISPs) such as AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast to…

  • Backgrounder posted November 25, 2014 by James L. Gattuso, Michael Sargent Beyond Hypothetical: How FCC Internet Regulation Would Hurt Consumers

    On November 10, President Barack Obama joined a long-simmering debate at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), urging the agency to adopt comprehensive government regulation of Internet service providers, such as Verizon and Comcast. These regulations would require companies that provide Internet access to end users (households and businesses) to process all…

  • Backgrounder posted November 6, 2012 by James L. Gattuso Adjusting the Picture: Television Regulation for the 21st Century

    Abstract: Television broadcasting, long subject to uniquely comprehensive regulation, has become economically “normal,” characterized today by competition and innovation. The industry however, is seeing growing conflicts between traditional broadcasters and the newer cable and satellite providers over retransmission rights. Some have urged the FCC to take a more…

  • WebMemo posted May 13, 2011 by James L. Gattuso AT&T and T-Mobile: Good Deal, Bad Process

    The battle over AT&T’s proposed acquisition of struggling wireless carrier T-Mobile officially began last month when AT&T filed papers with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requesting approval. The deal seems to be a sensible one, potentially benefiting T-Mobile’s and AT&T’s subscribers.[1] Not so sensible, however, is the process regulators will…

  • WebMemo posted March 7, 2011 by James L. Gattuso Net Neutrality: Time for Congress to Act

    Should the FCC be allowed to regulate the Internet? That’s the question facing Congress as it reviews the “net neutrality” rule recently adopted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The House Commerce Committee is expected to vote soon on a “resolution of disapproval” to void the regulation. Even if such a resolution is not ultimately adopted—presidential…

  • WebMemo posted December 17, 2010 by James L. Gattuso Red Tape Under the Tree: FCC Plans Internet Regulation for Christmas

    We have two branches of government—Congress and the courts—expressing grave concerns with our agency becoming increasingly unmoored from our statutory authority. By seeking to regulate the Internet now, we exceed the authority Congress has given us, and justify those concerns. —FCC Commissioner Meredith Atwell Baker[1] Should regulators in Washington, D.C., set…

  • WebMemo posted April 15, 2010 by James L. Gattuso The FCC and Broadband Regulation: What Part of "No" Did You Not Understand?

    Last week, the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) plans to regulate broadband Internet services were derailed by a U.S. appeals court, which ruled that the FCC lacks authority over broadband. The decision, while not unexpected, was a crushing defeat for the agency, which has proposed far-reaching "neutrality" rules for Internet providers. Nevertheless,…

  • WebMemo posted September 2, 2008 by Jena Baker McNeill FCC Needs to Reexamine Public Safety Spectrum

    The recent failure by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to garner the minimum bid on the public safety spectrum is a major setback for interoperability in the United States. Micromanagement, coupled with a lack of homework by the FCC, created an auction destined for failure. The FCC must examine what went wrong and ensure that the re-auction takes into…

  • Backgrounder posted May 6, 2008 by James L. Gattuso The FCC's Cross-Ownership Rule: Turning the Page on Media

    Should radio and television stations be allowed to own newspapers? Last December, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) answered "sometimes." Specifically, the five-member agency voted to liberalize its 33-year-old blanket prohibition on cross-ownership, allowing broadcast licenses to be owned jointly with newspaper licensees. The decision is now being challenged…

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Find more work on Federal Communications Commission