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Department of Housing and Urban Development

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  • Backgrounder posted March 11, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Stagnant Wages: Fact or Fiction?

    Recent data show that wages have been growing recently at rates comparable to their long-term trends. Measuring average wages accurately is more difficult than it sounds, so this paper looks at six metrics of wage and compensation to present a complete picture. Since the beginning of 2013, wages have grown about 0.9 percent per year. Since 2006 (and thus including the…

  • Backgrounder posted May 11, 2015 by John L. Ligon, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. The Federal Housing Administration: What Record of Success?

    More than 80 years ago, Congress passed a series of laws that significantly expanded the federal government’s presence in the housing finance system. These federal programs have grown and contributed to an explosion of mortgage debt over the past few decades. Homeownership rates, however, have barely changed since the late 1960s. The long-term increase in mortgage debt…

  • Issue Brief posted June 4, 2015 by John Gray, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D., Michael Sargent House Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations: The Highway to Bankruptcy

    The House of Representatives will soon consider the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill. The THUD appropriations bill provides funding for the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development. The bill provides $55.3 billion in discretionary budget authority. This represents a $1.5 billion increase above the current…

  • Issue Brief posted May 18, 2016 by Justin Bogie, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D., Michael Sargent Senate Bill Should Cut Wasteful Programs and Provide Long-Term Sustainability for Highway Programs

    The Senate will soon consider the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill. The THUD bill provides funding for the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development. The 2017 bill provides a total of $56.5 billion in discretionary budget authority. This represents an $827 million decrease below the current funding level and…

  • WebMemo posted January 31, 2012 by Ronald D. Utt, Ph.D. HUD’s Mandatory Minority Relocation Program

    President Obama’s Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is beginning to insidiously intrude in local housing policies in a concerted effort to require racial and economic integration in American communities. It started in 2009, when HUD began using a settlement between the county of Westchester in New York and a civil rights organization as an opportunity to…

  • Backgrounder posted April 22, 2008 by Ronald D. Utt, Ph.D. The Subprime Mortgage Market Collapse: A Primer on the Causes and Possible Solutions

    The collapse of the subprime mortgage market in late 2006 set in motion a chain reaction of economic and financial adversity that has spread to global financial markets, created depression-like conditions in the housing market, and pushed the U.S. economy to the brink of recession. In response, many in Congress and the executive branch have proposed new federal …

  • Backgrounder posted October 26, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Stagnant Wages: What the Data Show

    Recent data show that wages have been growing at rates comparable to their long-term trends. Measuring average wages accurately is more difficult than it sounds, so this Backgrounder examines six metrics of wage and compensation to present a complete picture.[1] Since the beginning of 2013, wages have grown between 1.1 percent and 1.9 percent per year. Over longer…

  • WebMemo posted October 27, 2008 by Brian W. Walsh, Ryan O'Donnell Congress's Investigation into the Subprime Mortgage Meltdown: TheSo-Called Search for the Truth

    Although the subprime mortgage meltdown threatens to shatter the U.S. economy, Congress has thus far failed to conduct an honest bipartisan investigation into fundamental forces at the core of this crisis. Indeed, rather than focusing on the root causes that Congress is best positioned to investigate and understand--i.e., the effects of Congress's own policies and…

  • Special Report posted November 21, 2013 by David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D., Patrick Tyrrell The 2013 Index of Dependence on Government

    The Index of Dependence on Government measures the growth in spending on dependence-creating programs that supplant the role of civil society. Dependence on government in the U.S. rose again in 2011, the year of the most recently available data, and which is principally assessed by this report. A solid majority of Americans polled by Rasmussen believe that government…

  • Special Report posted February 8, 2012 by William W. Beach, Patrick Tyrrell The 2012 Index of Dependence on Government

    Abstract: The great and calamitous fiscal trends of our time—dependence on government by an increasing portion of the American population, and soaring debt that threatens the financial integrity of the economy—worsened yet again in 2010 and 2011. The United States has long reached the point at which it must reverse the direction of both trends or face economic and social…

Find more work on Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Issue Brief posted May 18, 2016 by Justin Bogie, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D., Michael Sargent Senate Bill Should Cut Wasteful Programs and Provide Long-Term Sustainability for Highway Programs

    The Senate will soon consider the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill. The THUD bill provides funding for the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development. The 2017 bill provides a total of $56.5 billion in discretionary budget authority. This represents an $827 million decrease below the current funding level and…

  • Backgrounder posted October 26, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Stagnant Wages: What the Data Show

    Recent data show that wages have been growing at rates comparable to their long-term trends. Measuring average wages accurately is more difficult than it sounds, so this Backgrounder examines six metrics of wage and compensation to present a complete picture.[1] Since the beginning of 2013, wages have grown between 1.1 percent and 1.9 percent per year. Over longer…

  • Issue Brief posted June 4, 2015 by John Gray, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D., Michael Sargent House Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations: The Highway to Bankruptcy

    The House of Representatives will soon consider the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD) appropriations bill. The THUD appropriations bill provides funding for the Departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development. The bill provides $55.3 billion in discretionary budget authority. This represents a $1.5 billion increase above the current…

  • Backgrounder posted May 11, 2015 by John L. Ligon, Norbert J. Michel, Ph.D. The Federal Housing Administration: What Record of Success?

    More than 80 years ago, Congress passed a series of laws that significantly expanded the federal government’s presence in the housing finance system. These federal programs have grown and contributed to an explosion of mortgage debt over the past few decades. Homeownership rates, however, have barely changed since the late 1960s. The long-term increase in mortgage debt…

  • Backgrounder posted March 11, 2015 by Salim Furth, Ph.D. Stagnant Wages: Fact or Fiction?

    Recent data show that wages have been growing recently at rates comparable to their long-term trends. Measuring average wages accurately is more difficult than it sounds, so this paper looks at six metrics of wage and compensation to present a complete picture. Since the beginning of 2013, wages have grown about 0.9 percent per year. Since 2006 (and thus including the…

  • Special Report posted November 21, 2013 by David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D., Patrick Tyrrell The 2013 Index of Dependence on Government

    The Index of Dependence on Government measures the growth in spending on dependence-creating programs that supplant the role of civil society. Dependence on government in the U.S. rose again in 2011, the year of the most recently available data, and which is principally assessed by this report. A solid majority of Americans polled by Rasmussen believe that government…

  • Special Report posted February 8, 2012 by William W. Beach, Patrick Tyrrell The 2012 Index of Dependence on Government

    Abstract: The great and calamitous fiscal trends of our time—dependence on government by an increasing portion of the American population, and soaring debt that threatens the financial integrity of the economy—worsened yet again in 2010 and 2011. The United States has long reached the point at which it must reverse the direction of both trends or face economic and social…

  • WebMemo posted January 31, 2012 by Ronald D. Utt, Ph.D. HUD’s Mandatory Minority Relocation Program

    President Obama’s Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is beginning to insidiously intrude in local housing policies in a concerted effort to require racial and economic integration in American communities. It started in 2009, when HUD began using a settlement between the county of Westchester in New York and a civil rights organization as an opportunity to…

  • White Paper posted November 1, 2011 by Patrick Louis Knudsen, Emily Goff Appropriations Tracker: FY 2012

    The FY 2013 version of the Appropriations Tracker is available here. Download a PDF version with hyperlinks to House and Senate Appropriations Committee documents: Appropriations Tracker: FY 2012 Designed to inform American policymakers and citizens, the Appropriations Tracker: FY 2012 monitors the progress of appropriations bills as they move through the…

  • Center for Data Analysis Report posted October 14, 2010 by William W. Beach, Patrick Tyrrell The 2010 Index of Dependence on Government

    Abstract: The number of Americans who pay taxes continues to shrink—and the United States is close to the point at which half of the population will not pay taxes for government benefits they receive. In 2009, 64.3 million Americans depended on the government (read: their fellow citizens) for their daily housing, food, and health care. Starting in 2015, the Social…

Find more work on Department of Housing and Urban Development
Find more work on Department of Housing and Urban Development