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Maritime Supremacy

Our Research & Offerings on Maritime Supremacy
  • Commentary posted January 16, 2013 by Brian Slattery US Naval Fleet is Shrinking

    After long delays, Russia has deployed a new ballistic missile submarine, or nuclear submarine, for the first time in more than 20 years. This marks a significant step forward for its navy, which has pledged tens of billions of dollars to revitalize its fleet. The U.S. Navy, unfortunately, has had trouble both in revitalizing its subs as well as its overall naval…

  • Issue Brief posted May 15, 2012 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Baker Spring Congress Should Invest in Seapower over Bureaucracy

    The U.S. House of Representatives showed strong support for national security when it voted through a reconciliation process to override the sequestration cuts scheduled for defense in January 2013. By following the House Armed Services Committee’s (HASC) lead in raising the top-line budget for defense over the President’s fiscal year 2013 request, Congress can sustain…

  • Issue Brief posted February 29, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. All Congressional Hands on Deck: Cutting Coast Guard Cutters Big Mistake

    The National Security Cutter (NSC) is the Coast Guard’s flagship for the future. Commandant Admiral Robert Papp recently declared, “The NSC is proving to be a vital instrument for protecting American maritime security and prosperity.”[1] Yet in his fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget request, the President cuts the two vessels that were supposed to complete the fleet. Congress…

  • Backgrounder posted August 24, 2011 by Steven Groves Accession to the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea Is Unnecessary to Secure U.S. Navigational Rights and Freedoms

    Abstract: For more than 200 years, the United States has successfully preserved and protected its navigational rights and freedoms by relying on naval operations, diplomatic protests, and customary international law. U.S. membership in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) would not confer any maritime right or freedom that the U.S. does not already…

  • Backgrounder posted May 16, 2011 by Mackenzie Eaglen, Bryan McGrath Thinking About a Day Without Sea Power: Implications for U.S. Defense Policy

    Abstract: America is a maritime power, and a strong U.S. Navy is both in America’s long-term interest and essential to the nation’s prosperity. Yet U.S. sea power is in decline. If not reversed, this decline could pass the tipping point, leaving the country economically and strategically unable to reverse course, which would have profound economic and geopolitical…

  • WebMemo on June 7, 2010 Budget Cuts Could Harm Navy

    Under the current Administration, domestic entitlement programs and interest on the national debt remain firmly entrenched as the fastest growing portions of the federal budget; only discretionary programs are at risk for budget cuts. Accounting for 60 percent of discretionary funds, national security is the most at-risk slice of federal spending. Within the national…

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  • Backgrounder posted August 24, 2011 by Steven Groves Accession to the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea Is Unnecessary to Secure U.S. Navigational Rights and Freedoms

    Abstract: For more than 200 years, the United States has successfully preserved and protected its navigational rights and freedoms by relying on naval operations, diplomatic protests, and customary international law. U.S. membership in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) would not confer any maritime right or freedom that the U.S. does not already…

  • Commentary posted January 16, 2013 by Brian Slattery US Naval Fleet is Shrinking

    After long delays, Russia has deployed a new ballistic missile submarine, or nuclear submarine, for the first time in more than 20 years. This marks a significant step forward for its navy, which has pledged tens of billions of dollars to revitalize its fleet. The U.S. Navy, unfortunately, has had trouble both in revitalizing its subs as well as its overall naval…

  • WebMemo on June 7, 2010 Budget Cuts Could Harm Navy

    Under the current Administration, domestic entitlement programs and interest on the national debt remain firmly entrenched as the fastest growing portions of the federal budget; only discretionary programs are at risk for budget cuts. Accounting for 60 percent of discretionary funds, national security is the most at-risk slice of federal spending. Within the national…

  • Issue Brief posted February 29, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. All Congressional Hands on Deck: Cutting Coast Guard Cutters Big Mistake

    The National Security Cutter (NSC) is the Coast Guard’s flagship for the future. Commandant Admiral Robert Papp recently declared, “The NSC is proving to be a vital instrument for protecting American maritime security and prosperity.”[1] Yet in his fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget request, the President cuts the two vessels that were supposed to complete the fleet. Congress…

  • Backgrounder posted May 16, 2011 by Mackenzie Eaglen, Bryan McGrath Thinking About a Day Without Sea Power: Implications for U.S. Defense Policy

    Abstract: America is a maritime power, and a strong U.S. Navy is both in America’s long-term interest and essential to the nation’s prosperity. Yet U.S. sea power is in decline. If not reversed, this decline could pass the tipping point, leaving the country economically and strategically unable to reverse course, which would have profound economic and geopolitical…

  • Issue Brief posted May 15, 2012 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Baker Spring Congress Should Invest in Seapower over Bureaucracy

    The U.S. House of Representatives showed strong support for national security when it voted through a reconciliation process to override the sequestration cuts scheduled for defense in January 2013. By following the House Armed Services Committee’s (HASC) lead in raising the top-line budget for defense over the President’s fiscal year 2013 request, Congress can sustain…

Find more work on Maritime Supremacy
  • Issue Brief posted May 15, 2012 by Steven P. Bucci, Ph.D., Baker Spring Congress Should Invest in Seapower over Bureaucracy

    The U.S. House of Representatives showed strong support for national security when it voted through a reconciliation process to override the sequestration cuts scheduled for defense in January 2013. By following the House Armed Services Committee’s (HASC) lead in raising the top-line budget for defense over the President’s fiscal year 2013 request, Congress can sustain…

  • Issue Brief posted February 29, 2012 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. All Congressional Hands on Deck: Cutting Coast Guard Cutters Big Mistake

    The National Security Cutter (NSC) is the Coast Guard’s flagship for the future. Commandant Admiral Robert Papp recently declared, “The NSC is proving to be a vital instrument for protecting American maritime security and prosperity.”[1] Yet in his fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget request, the President cuts the two vessels that were supposed to complete the fleet. Congress…

  • Backgrounder posted August 24, 2011 by Steven Groves Accession to the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea Is Unnecessary to Secure U.S. Navigational Rights and Freedoms

    Abstract: For more than 200 years, the United States has successfully preserved and protected its navigational rights and freedoms by relying on naval operations, diplomatic protests, and customary international law. U.S. membership in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) would not confer any maritime right or freedom that the U.S. does not already…

  • Backgrounder posted May 16, 2011 by Mackenzie Eaglen, Bryan McGrath Thinking About a Day Without Sea Power: Implications for U.S. Defense Policy

    Abstract: America is a maritime power, and a strong U.S. Navy is both in America’s long-term interest and essential to the nation’s prosperity. Yet U.S. sea power is in decline. If not reversed, this decline could pass the tipping point, leaving the country economically and strategically unable to reverse course, which would have profound economic and geopolitical…

  • WebMemo on June 7, 2010 Budget Cuts Could Harm Navy

    Under the current Administration, domestic entitlement programs and interest on the national debt remain firmly entrenched as the fastest growing portions of the federal budget; only discretionary programs are at risk for budget cuts. Accounting for 60 percent of discretionary funds, national security is the most at-risk slice of federal spending. Within the national…

Find more work on Maritime Supremacy