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U.S. Extended Continental Shelf in the Arctic

Created on May 15, 2012

U.S. Extended Continental Shelf in the Arctic

U.S. Extended Continental Shelf in the Arctic

B 2688

heritage.org

A major U.S.–Canada ECS boundary in the Arctic remains to be negotiated. Russia’s 2001 submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf respects the 1990 U.S.–USSR treaty boundary and extends it up to the North Pole. While the Russian submission likely results in an excessive ECS claim and infringes on Canada’s potential ECS, it does not conflict with any U.S. claim.

MAP 4

Arctic Ocean

200-nautical-mile EEZ boundary lines

Presumptive ECS of United States

Presumptive ECS of Canada

ECS claimed by Russia in 2001 submission to CLCS

Russia’s claimed boundary line

Boundary to be negotiatied between U.S. and Canada

200 nm

U.S.–Canada Likely Demarcation Line

U.S.–USSR 1990 Treaty Line

Bering Sea

Chukchi Sea

Laptev Sea

North

Pole

Barents Sea

Baffin Bay

Svalbard (Norway)

greenland (Denmark)

Canada

Alaska

Russia

Sources: U.S. State Department, “Agreement with the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Maritime Boundary,” September 26, 1990, http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/125431.pdf (accessed April 17, 2012); United Nations, submission by the Russian Federation to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, Map 2, December 20, 2001, http://www.un.org/depts/los/clcs_new/submissions_files/rus01/RUS_CLCS_01_2001_LOS_2.jpg (accessed May 8, 2012); and Durham University, “Maritime jurisdiction and boundaries in the Arctic Region,” International Boundaries Research Unit, December 20, 2011, http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/ibru/arctic.pdf (accessed May 8, 2012).