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Apr 11

Conservative Women's Network: Rep. Diane Black (R-TN)

Diane Black

As a nurse for over 40 years, small business owner and former educator, Congressman Diane Black brings a unique perspective to her work in Washington. 

 From her work in the health care field, Black learned first-hand the importance of high-quality care and the obstacles faced by both patients and providers. She began her career as an emergency room nurse, but also served as a long-term care nurse and worked as part of an outpatient surgery team. 

Elected to Congress in 2010, Black represents Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District, which encompasses areas north, east and south of Nashville. Black came to Washington on a platform of conservative values, with particular focus on fiscal restraint and curbing government debt, and enacting market-based health care reform. 

Upon coming to Congress, Black was elected by her fellow freshmen Members of Congress to serve as the Freshman Class Representative to the Republican Policy Committee, a forum where Republicans can discuss and forward their legislative initiatives. 

Black was also chosen as one of only two freshmen to serve on the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, and has been a part of the committee’s efforts to fundamentally reform our nation’s tax system for the first time in over 20 years. Additionally, Black has been at the center of many health care debates within the committee. In November of 2011, Black was one of the first House Freshmen to see one of her bills signed into law—legislation that closed a loophole in the President's health care law and saved $13 billion. 

Black is also a Member of the House Budget Committee, and a strong supporter of The Path to Prosperity 2012 budget, which saves Medicare for future generations and puts our budgets on a path to balance. She has since introduced legislation that would reform the budget process and give federal budgets the force of law—ensuring that spending levels set by Congress are followed each year. 

Building off her work in the Tennessee Legislature as a pro-life leader, Black has consistently fought for the rights of the unborn. Her first piece of legislation, HConRes 36, would have prevented Planned Parenthood from receiving federal dollars in the continuing resolution fight in the spring of 2011 and passed the House in a bipartisan vote. Black has cosponsored legislation that would codify the Hyde Amendment, as well as prohibiting abortion funding in the federal health care law. 

Black and her husband of over 30 years, Dr. David Black have three grown children and six grandchildren. They currently live in Gallatin and attend Community Church in Hendersonville.

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