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Virginia

Our Research & Offerings on Virginia
  • Commentary posted January 28, 2016 by James Sherk Why West Virginia Is Likely to Become the 26th Right-To-Work State

    West Virginia seems almost certain to soon become American’s 26th right-to-work state. Republicans took control of both houses of the West Virginia legislature in 2014. State legislative leaders have made passing right-to-work this year a top priority. It only takes a simple majority to override a veto in West Virginia, so final passage seems assured. The state senate…

  • Posted on March 17, 2014 by Ken McIntyre Heritage Panel: Personal Opinion No Excuse to Abandon Marriage Laws

    Virginia’s Democratic attorney general made history not only by declining to carry out his duty to defend state...…

  • Posted on November 6, 2013 by Robert Bluey New Jersey, Virginia Exit Polls: Majority Oppose Obamacare

    There was one clear loser on Election Day: Obamacare. President Obama's unfair, unaffordable, and unworkable law is a...…

  • Posted on October 18, 2013 by Nat Brown The Battle of Yorktown, Then and Now

    Restaurant owner Glenn Helseth and his wife have operated the Carrot Tree Kitchens Restaurant in Yorktown, Virginia,...…

  • Posted on September 7, 2013 by Alicia Cohn Obamacare's Impact on Campus: Students Lose Health Coverage When Premiums Rise

    When Obamacare hits campus, students lose options. Obamacare mandates are already forcing many colleges and...…

  • Posted on August 22, 2013 by Alyene Senger When You Can't Actually Keep Your Health Care Plan

    President Obama has said that his health care law largely doesn’t impact anyone who already has coverage. Tell that to...…

  • Issue Brief posted August 16, 2013 by Drew Gonshorowski Medicaid Expansion and State-Level Evaluation in Virginia

    Many states have conducted various versions of evaluation of the budgetary effects of expanding Medicaid. One state in particular that has participated in a rather robust analytical discussion is Virginia. According to the Urban Institute, “Virginia exemplifies a state where public officials and private stakeholders have carefully analyzed multiple effects of the Medicaid…

  • Posted on July 25, 2013 by Kelsey Harris Why Is This Immigrant So Fired Up Against Amnesty?

    It was 1988. Virginia Prodan had no money, spoke no English, and had two children with a baby on the way. But she was...…

  • Issue Brief posted May 29, 2013 by Jack Spencer Virginia Uranium Mining: Draft Regulations Now, Lift Moratorium Later

    Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell (R) has consistently spoken about making his state the energy capital of the east coast. And indeed, Virginia has the potential to be exactly that with oil and gas resources on and off its shores and significant coal deposits in the state’s southwest. It also has the largest uranium deposit in the nation located on private property in the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 25, 2013 by Emily Goff Virginia and Maryland’s Transportation Plans Fuel Tax Hikes, Not Mobility

    The federal government’s ultimate goal for transportation should be to devolve the resources and decision making to the states, who know their transportation needs better than Washington does.[1] Embracing devolution, however, does not equate to an endorsement of ill-conceived, misguided policy prescriptions. Two such examples are the plan recently passed by the Virginia…

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  • First Principles Series Report posted June 23, 2006 by Daniel L. Dreisbach The Mythical "Wall of Separation": How a Misused Metaphor Changed Church–State Law, Policy, and Discourse

    No metaphor in American letters has had a more profound influence on law and policy than Thomas Jefferson's "wall of separation between church and state." Today, this figure of speech is accepted by many Americans as a pithy description of the constitutionally prescribed church-state arrangement, and it has become the sacred icon of a strict separationist dogma that…

  • First Principles Series Report posted May 1, 2006 by Keith E. Whittington How to Read the Constitution: Self-Government and the Jurisprudence of Originalism

    The argument that original meaning should guide constitutional interpretation is nearly as old as the Constitution itself. Before there were strict constructionists, before there were judicial activists, there were originalists. In those early days, few seriously objected to the notion that the Constitution should be read in accord with its original meaning, though there…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2012 by Jack Spencer, Katie Tubb Time to Allow Uranium Mining in Virginia

    The federal government banned uranium mining on more than 1 million acres of federal land in Arizona.[1] Virginia lawmakers are considering doing the same in their own state. Buried 1,600 feet beneath a cattle farm in southern Virginia on a tract of private land called Coles Hill are 119 million pounds of uranium ore—the nation’s largest known deposit of uranium, and the…

  • Issue Brief posted August 16, 2013 by Drew Gonshorowski Medicaid Expansion and State-Level Evaluation in Virginia

    Many states have conducted various versions of evaluation of the budgetary effects of expanding Medicaid. One state in particular that has participated in a rather robust analytical discussion is Virginia. According to the Urban Institute, “Virginia exemplifies a state where public officials and private stakeholders have carefully analyzed multiple effects of the Medicaid…

  • Issue Brief posted May 29, 2013 by Jack Spencer Virginia Uranium Mining: Draft Regulations Now, Lift Moratorium Later

    Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell (R) has consistently spoken about making his state the energy capital of the east coast. And indeed, Virginia has the potential to be exactly that with oil and gas resources on and off its shores and significant coal deposits in the state’s southwest. It also has the largest uranium deposit in the nation located on private property in the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 25, 2013 by Emily Goff Virginia and Maryland’s Transportation Plans Fuel Tax Hikes, Not Mobility

    The federal government’s ultimate goal for transportation should be to devolve the resources and decision making to the states, who know their transportation needs better than Washington does.[1] Embracing devolution, however, does not equate to an endorsement of ill-conceived, misguided policy prescriptions. Two such examples are the plan recently passed by the Virginia…

  • Backgrounder posted July 7, 2008 by James Sherk, Patrick Tyrrell Davis-Bacon Flaws Hurt Virginia's Workers

    The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931 requires contractors on all federal construction projects to pay their workers the prevailing wage in their locality. The law is intended to ensure that the government does not drive down construction workers' wages, but flaws in the U.S. Department of Labor's wage determination process have caused the law to have the opposite effect in…

  • Lecture posted May 5, 2004 by The Honorable Frank J. Williams Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties in Wartime

    This month, several individuals detained as "enemy combatants" will make their appeals for freedom to the highest court in the land. Perhaps now, more than any other time in recent memory, the eyes of the world are intensely focused on the United States Supreme Court. In making their decisions, they must walk a fine line between protecting the civil liberties we all…

  • Backgrounder posted July 28, 2008 by Ronald D. Utt, Ph.D. How States Can Improve Their Transportation Systems and Relieve Traffic Congestion

    Over the past several decades, federal and state transportation policies have struggled to keep pace with a rising population and increasing numbers of motorists and trucks using the roads. As a result, congestion has worsened in most major metropolitan areas, imposing extra costs on all motorists and truckers and threatening to undermine the economic vitality of many…

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  • Issue Brief posted August 16, 2013 by Drew Gonshorowski Medicaid Expansion and State-Level Evaluation in Virginia

    Many states have conducted various versions of evaluation of the budgetary effects of expanding Medicaid. One state in particular that has participated in a rather robust analytical discussion is Virginia. According to the Urban Institute, “Virginia exemplifies a state where public officials and private stakeholders have carefully analyzed multiple effects of the Medicaid…

  • Issue Brief posted May 29, 2013 by Jack Spencer Virginia Uranium Mining: Draft Regulations Now, Lift Moratorium Later

    Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell (R) has consistently spoken about making his state the energy capital of the east coast. And indeed, Virginia has the potential to be exactly that with oil and gas resources on and off its shores and significant coal deposits in the state’s southwest. It also has the largest uranium deposit in the nation located on private property in the…

  • Issue Brief posted March 25, 2013 by Emily Goff Virginia and Maryland’s Transportation Plans Fuel Tax Hikes, Not Mobility

    The federal government’s ultimate goal for transportation should be to devolve the resources and decision making to the states, who know their transportation needs better than Washington does.[1] Embracing devolution, however, does not equate to an endorsement of ill-conceived, misguided policy prescriptions. Two such examples are the plan recently passed by the Virginia…

  • Backgrounder posted October 15, 2012 by Jack Spencer, Katie Tubb Time to Allow Uranium Mining in Virginia

    The federal government banned uranium mining on more than 1 million acres of federal land in Arizona.[1] Virginia lawmakers are considering doing the same in their own state. Buried 1,600 feet beneath a cattle farm in southern Virginia on a tract of private land called Coles Hill are 119 million pounds of uranium ore—the nation’s largest known deposit of uranium, and the…

  • Backgrounder posted July 28, 2008 by Ronald D. Utt, Ph.D. How States Can Improve Their Transportation Systems and Relieve Traffic Congestion

    Over the past several decades, federal and state transportation policies have struggled to keep pace with a rising population and increasing numbers of motorists and trucks using the roads. As a result, congestion has worsened in most major metropolitan areas, imposing extra costs on all motorists and truckers and threatening to undermine the economic vitality of many…

  • Backgrounder posted July 7, 2008 by James Sherk, Patrick Tyrrell Davis-Bacon Flaws Hurt Virginia's Workers

    The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931 requires contractors on all federal construction projects to pay their workers the prevailing wage in their locality. The law is intended to ensure that the government does not drive down construction workers' wages, but flaws in the U.S. Department of Labor's wage determination process have caused the law to have the opposite effect in…

  • First Principles Series Report posted June 23, 2006 by Daniel L. Dreisbach The Mythical "Wall of Separation": How a Misused Metaphor Changed Church–State Law, Policy, and Discourse

    No metaphor in American letters has had a more profound influence on law and policy than Thomas Jefferson's "wall of separation between church and state." Today, this figure of speech is accepted by many Americans as a pithy description of the constitutionally prescribed church-state arrangement, and it has become the sacred icon of a strict separationist dogma that…

  • First Principles Series Report posted May 1, 2006 by Keith E. Whittington How to Read the Constitution: Self-Government and the Jurisprudence of Originalism

    The argument that original meaning should guide constitutional interpretation is nearly as old as the Constitution itself. Before there were strict constructionists, before there were judicial activists, there were originalists. In those early days, few seriously objected to the notion that the Constitution should be read in accord with its original meaning, though there…

Find more work on Virginia
Find more work on Virginia