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European Union

The United States has long supported the evolution of a Europe made up of prosperous and free countries that no longer go to war with each other. Yet recent decisions by the European Union, particularly the effort to carve out a defense identity separate from NATO, pose increasing challenges to transatlantic relations and U.S. interests around the world.

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Our Research & Offerings on European Union
  • Issue Brief posted October 20, 2016 by Luke Coffey, Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. The United States Should Not Back a European Union Army

    Out of desperation for European allies to do more to improve their military capabilities, many American policymakers are looking to the European Union as a panacea for Europe’s ills. The belief that a stronger EU role in defense matters will encourage European countries to invest more in defense is based on the false premise that the EU will be able to achieve what NATO…

  • Commentary posted September 14, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. U.S. Interests in the United Kingdom and Europe After Brexit

    The Senate Foreign Relations Committee will soon hold a hearing on “Brexit: U.S. Interests in the United Kingdom and Europe.” Both witnesses scheduled to appear are officials in the Obama Administration. Thus, while the hearing will shed light on the attitude of the current administration, which will soon leave office, it will not present the full range of U.S. opinion on…

  • Issue Brief posted August 9, 2016 by James M. Roberts, Diego Sánchez de la Cruz Post-Brexit: U.K. Can Lead Europe to Greater Economic Freedom

    Fear-mongering pundits and politicians campaigning for the “Remain” campaign had predicted dire consequences[1] for the United Kingdom if British voters decided to leave the European Union. Developments in the weeks following the June 23 decision by a solid majority to “Leave” have proven the Remain-side alarmists wrong. As “Vote Leave” proponent and Member of the…

  • Commentary posted July 1, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Britain is Back

    I’ve spent a good part of the past three decades studying Britain’s relations with Europe. In fact, I wrote my thesis on Britain’s first application to the EEC, the European Union’s predecessor. Being in Britain for the referendum was a joy. It was also a lesson. I watched the last week of the referendum campaign from London. That may have been a mistake – not the…

  • Commentary posted June 28, 2016 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Brexit's Aftermath

    For many people outside of Britain, the Brexit vote came in like a typical news item. One minute, you knew nothing about it (or almost nothing), then it was all over the news. And now you see people reacting with great passion over the result. For me, it wasn’t a surprise. Regular readers may recall that I endorsed a pro-Brexit vote two weeks ago, calling on my British…

  • Commentary posted June 27, 2016 by Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Britain's Exit is a Good Thing for Everyone

    Thursday's Brexit vote is a momentous step for the British people. For the first time in more than 40 years, they will be able to shape their own destiny as a world power. Brexit frees Great Britain from the shackles of the supra-national European Union, which has evolved into a big-government super-state -- one that restricts and constrains the sovereignty and freedom of…

  • Commentary posted June 27, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. A Win for Britain: Brexit's Victory is Democracy's Victory

    The results in Britain’s referendum on its membership of the European Union are in. And what a result. Britain has voted to leave, by a margin of 52 percent in favor, or over 1.2 million votes. Prime Minister David Cameron announced his resignation Friday morning. No pollster saw this coming. Nor did almost any of the Brexit campaigners. The evening opened with Nigel…

  • Issue Brief posted June 22, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Brexit Will Promote European, British, and American Security

    On June 23, Britain will hold a referendum on its membership in the European Union. Opponents of a British exit from the EU assert that a “Brexit” would be bad for both British security and the peace of Europe. Indeed, on May 9, British Prime Minister David Cameron, a supporter of Britain’s EU membership, implied that Brexit risks causing a European war.[1] This argument…

  • Commentary posted June 20, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Brexit, Britain's Immigration Fight

    On Thursday, Britain will vote in a referendum on whether it should exit — hence, Brexit — the European Union. If it does leave, one reason will be because the British people are fed up with uncontrolled immigration. This is a story about the arrogance of Britain’s elite, with a lesson for politicians in all countries. First, a word about the EU: If you’re in it, you…

  • Commentary posted June 15, 2016 by Edwin J. Feulner, Ph.D. Why 'Brexit' Makes Sense

    Full disclosure: I'm an Anglophile. In other words, I admire all things British. Well, almost all things: British cooking isn't always great, and the weather can be miserable, but when it comes to the basics — a commitment to the rule of law, punching above its weight in the world community, standing up for traditional values and individual liberty going back many…

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  • Issue Brief posted January 14, 2015 by Luke Coffey, Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., Nile Gardiner, Ph.D. Top Five Policy Priorities for Europe in 2015

    The United States faces mounting challenges in Europe in 2015. Russia is on the march in Ukraine, many of America’s oldest allies question its commitment to transatlantic security, and the economies of Europe have still not fully recovered from the Euro crisis. In addition, the specter of Islamist terrorism has raised its ugly head again in Europe, with the brutal slaying…

  • Issue Brief posted February 20, 2015 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D., James M. Roberts, Riddhi Dasgupta, PhD Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Mechanisms: An Important Feature of High-Quality Trade Agreements

    One of the most important—albeit controversial—components of the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) trade agreement between the United States and the European Union (EU) is the provision creating an investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism. The French Senate has unanimously called for the removal of this provision both from the TTIP…

  • Commentary posted March 25, 2014 by Diane Katz EU's cheesy food fight stinks to high heaven

    The European Union (EU) regulates the curvature of cucumbers, the contour of radish “shoulders” and the arc of pea pods. We should not be surprised, then, by Brussels’ recent demand that American cheese makers refrain from labeling their products as “feta,” “mozzarella,” “parmesan” or any other appellation of European origin. One might reasonably wonder whether cheese…

  • Commentary posted February 16, 2014 by James Jay Carafano, Ph.D. Visa waivers shouldn't be hostage to fight over illegal immigrant amnesty

    In 2007, then Sen. George Voinovich told the story of a young Czech soldier who wanted to visit some American veterans with whom he had served side-by-side in Iraq. He applied for a visa, but the U.S. consular office gave him an expected answer: Application denied. The reason? He had recently been in a country with an active terrorist threat. Iraq. One year later, things…

  • Commentary posted March 22, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Can Britain learn to stand up for itself?

    ONE way or another, Britain will have a national referendum on EU membership. But the point of the referendum is not to vote. It is to choose between different futures. The advocates of the EU, like Lord Mandelson, argue that Britain needs to “concentrate on using all of our influence and energy in building up Britain’s influence in Europe”. That is the same siren song…

  • Commentary posted February 24, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Of Mullahs and Lawyers

    In a recently leaked private phone call, an EU foreign policy official, Helga Schmid, grumbled to the EU’s ambassador to Kiev that it was “very annoying” that the United States had criticized the EU for being “too soft” to impose sanctions on Ukraine. Criticism may be annoying, but EU softness is a fact of life, and the transatlantic trouble over sanctions goes beyond…

  • Commentary posted February 16, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Nonprofit model entirely misleading

    One of the many virtues of the United States is it has an exceptionally lively nonprofit sector. There is an organization for everyone, and every organization speaks for itself. Europe is less fortunate: there, government funding of nonprofits is the norm. But at least Europe is waking up to the dangers of subsidies. We seem to be going to sleep. In the United States,…

  • Issue Brief posted January 24, 2014 by Ariel Cohen, Ph.D. Ukraine’s Anti-Protest Laws: A Step Backwards in Time

    Violent clashes between police and demonstrators erupted in Kyiv, Ukraine, last weekend in the wake of new legislation effectively banning public protest. If the two sides do not take a step back from the brink, the confrontation may lead to chaos, when neither the government nor the opposition have control. The legislation, passed on January 16 by President Victor…

  • Commentary posted October 2, 2014 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. In Birmingham, Shut Up and Cheer

    The first thing that strikes an American about the Conservative party’s annual conference — which opened on Sunday in Birmingham, in Britain’s Midlands — is how small it feels. The convention center will supposedly welcome almost 14,000 attendees, but it looked less crowded — and less engaged — than the meeting in the United States of the Conservative Political Action…

  • Commentary posted January 11, 2016 by Theodore R. Bromund, Ph.D. Why Project Fear Is David Cameron's Ultimate Weapon in EU Struggle

    David Cameron launched his renegotiation of Britain’s EU membership with the hope that “we can deliver a more flexible, adaptable and open European Union”. As that optimism has faded, the resort to fear has grown. And so far, the US has lent a willing hand. It’s startling to go back now to Cameron’s Bloomberg speech. It appeared to make the case for fundamental reform…

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Find more work on European Union
Find more work on European Union